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Intro: "My colleague Mike Whitney asks: 'So, what are the chances that Strauss-Kahn will get a fair trial now that he's been blasted as a serial sex offender in about 3,000 articles and in all the televised news reports? Do you remember any Wall Street bankers being dragged off in handcuffs when they blew up the financial system and bilked people out of trillions of dollars?' The answer to both questions is certainly 'Non,' in French, or 'No,' in English, but there's more to the connection between Sex and Wall Street."

Dominique Strauss-Kahn, head of the IMF, is arraigned on charges he sexually assaulted a hotel maid, 05/16/11. (photo: Emmanuel Dunand/AP)
Dominique Strauss-Kahn, head of the IMF, is arraigned on charges he sexually assaulted a hotel maid, 05/16/11. (photo: Emmanuel Dunand/AP)



Sex and Bankers

By Danny Schechter, Reader Supported News

19 May 11


Reader Supported News | Perspective

 

Strauss-Kahn and the secret culture of aggressive sexuality in the high-pressure world of bankers and banksters.

y colleague Mike Whitney asks: "So, what are the chances that Strauss-Kahn will get a fair trial now that he's been blasted as a serial sex offender in about 3,000 articles and in all the televised news reports?

Do you remember any Wall Street bankers being dragged off in handcuffs when they blew up the financial system and bilked people out of trillions of dollars?"

The answer to both questions is certainly "Non," in French, or "No," in English, but there's more to the connection between Sex and Wall Street. Without commenting on the evidence in this case - which has been asserted, not proven - there is a deeper context that is being ignored.

I call it the Testosterone Factor in "The Crime of Our Time," my book about how Wall Street criminally engineered the financial crisis.

Interesting, isn't it, that there have been so few references to the link between the pervasiveness of salacious sex and the highly-charged life of a class of "entitled" wealthy bankers who live off of others with few rules or restraints.

There is also often no news about that, or the practices of the IMF, which is often accused of raping poor and vulnerable countries with unfair structural adjustment programs. The IMF chief is now experiencing what many in France feel is an unfair "personal adjustment program" at the hands of the New York cops and courts.

Odd, isn't it, that there have been so few references in the coverage also to Eliot Spitzer, the one-time "Sheriff" of Wall Street who was denouncing criminal financial practices by the Bush administration when he was brought down in a sex scandal.

Strauss-Kahn had also been in the news lately as a possible Socialist presidential candidate to topple our pal Sarkosy in France, as well as a critic of US banking practices. He recently outraged official Washington by asserting that the Chinese economy was surpassing ours.

In both cases, powerful forces have motives to bring down such potential reformers, but, it is also true that in each case these men themselves were, on the surface anyway, sexually obsessed and prone to illegal behavior that put them - and others - at risk.

Both are Alpha Males known for pushing the envelope of personal responsibility. Both were known for personal arrogance and living in highly-secretive sexualized personal cultures. Writer Tristan Banon claimed she had to fight DSK off in an earlier incident, calling him a "strutting chimpanzee."

Bear in mind also that part of what intelligence agencies do these days in targeting people is to prepare sophisticated psychological profiles before they intervene. They know that the knowledge of the secret lives - and kinks - of public figures can easily discredit them. They specialize in foraging for dirt and can leak information or use it opportunistically.

Remember Richard Nixon's authorized break-in at the office of Daniel Ellsberg's psychiatrist pursuing highly personal information?

Nothing is off-limits, as people like former weapons inspector Scott Ritter learned as well when he became embroiled in a mini sex-caper.

When people are highly stressed they are prone to making mistakes. The agencies shadowing them know that, and from time to time encourage it or just wait for the opportunity to help them bring themselves down.

What needs to be examined is how the crimes of the rich and powerful are treated. Bush's bombing and Geithner's tax maneuvers were ignored.

But when sex is involved, all bets are off.

Sex scandals have become a staple of media exploitation with personal morality plays trumping political morality confrontations every time.

They are both great distractions and effective tools of character assassination which are often more effective than more violent ways to neutralize people considered dangerous.

That's why the FBI was so hot to discredit Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. with leaks of so-called wiretapped sex tapes. In his case, this tactic failed but the other worked.

In some cases both tactics are deployed, as in the physical assassination of Bin Laden and then the character-killing aimed at his supporters through the release of porn allegedly found in his "lair."

Intense sexual appetites are an extension of the "culture" of an avaricious financial world. Illegal sex and Wall Street (or in La Defense, France's financial district) has long been linked, writes Heidi Moore:

"This is all a reminder that the financial district hasn't always been gleaming skyscrapers and Starbucks."

Consider this passage from City of Eros: New York City, Prostitution, and the Commercialization of Sex, 1790-1920: "Adjacent to the Wall Street business district, prostitutes worked in saloons along Greenwich Street, taking men upstairs. In addition, immediately south of Wall Street was the Battery Tender-loin, on Whitehall Street. The Water Street area, however, remained the most significant and poorest waterfront zone of prostitution. Amid the rookeries, rat pits and dance halls, prostitutes exposed in each window to the public view plied their trade."

In the modern era, many of the Street's most macho traders are, according to David Russell who worked in the industry for two decades, known as "swinging dicks." It is well known that the big money in Wall Street has kept a vibrant, upscale sex industry alive and well.

There has been one scandal after another. Here are a few cases cited by Moore before Spitzer's demise:

  • BP Chief Executive John Browne left both his post at the oil company and his directorship at Goldman Sachs Group last year after it was revealed that Lord Browne had lied to a court about his young male lover, whom he had met through an escort-service Web site.


  • A group of six women sued Dresdner Kleinwort in 2006 for $1.4 billion on allegations that male executives entertained clients at strip clubs and even brought prostitutes back to the office. The case was settled out of court in 2007.


  • Canadian hedge fund manager Paul Eustace in 2007, by his own admission in a deposition filed in court lied to investors and cheated on his wife with a stripper.


  • In 1987, Peter Detwiler, vice chairman of E.F. Hutton & Co., was, according to court testimony, instructed by his client, Tesoro Petroleum Corp. Chairman Robert V. West, to hire a blonde prostitute for the finance minister of Trinidad & Tobago, which had been supporting a tax issue that would have hurt Tesoro's profits.


  • A woman claiming to have been Bernard Madoff's mistress published a book about their secret liaisons. Earlier his secretary said he had a fondness for massages in an article in Vanity Fair.

Wall Street's fall is said to have brought down the sex industry almost as if it had been a fully owned subsidiary, if not an extension, of the financial services business.

To find out more, I spoke to Jonathan Albert, a psychologist practicing in mid-Manhattan.

He told me, "I see a lot of clients in NYC who are impacted by the economic crisis. People deal with stress in many different ways. Some people exercise, some people over-eat, some use drugs and alcohol, some even sexualize those feelings."

"Sexualize?" I asked him, "How do they sexualize these feelings?"

His response, "I've seen a lot of Wall Streeters who sexualize feelings of anxiety and stress and depression. So for example they might rely on adult sexual services to deal with those feelings."

Loretta Napoleoni, an Italian author who worked on Wall Street for years, offers a provocative thesis for how the need for paid sex "on the wild side" became part of the culture of irresponsibility.

"I can tell you that this is absolutely true because being a woman, having worked in finance 20 years ago I could tell you that even at that time - when the market was not going up so much - these guys, all they talk is sex."

She complemented her personal experience by citing a study by researchers from Oxford University.

"The study discovered, that an excessive production of testosterone, in a period of fantastic financial exuberance, creates a sort of confusion. It is what people in sports call 'being in the zone,' which means you get in a certain situation where you feel that you will always win. That you are infallible."

I asked Dr. Albert if that finding may have indeed had relevance to Spitzer or be endemic in the industry? His reply, "I do see this a lot in the finance industry, yes, people in positions of power often feel as if they can perhaps get away with it. There is sometimes a sense of entitlement."

"They feel entitled to take part in risky behavior?" I pressed.

"High-risk behavior. It's similar to what they do on a daily basis. They invest millions and millions of dollars and there is a great risk involved with that. The same is true with using the services of a prostitute. Obviously there are great health risks; their relationship is in great danger if they are using the services of a prostitute.

"A lot of people skate on the excitement, on that euphoric rush.

"The culture of risk on Wall Street was intoxicating to many in the same way that gamblers become addicted or report a rush when they are winning.

"The euphoria of life in the fast lane often implodes when one's luck runs out leading to depression and family breakups. One remedy is going to self-help groups like 'The Wall Street Wives Club,' formed to empower and serve the needs of wives and girlfriends whose husbands or significant others work in the stressful and volatile brokerage community.

"Men are often uncomfortable expressing their feelings."

Some of Dr. Albert's clients coped with the pressures on them to perform in kinkier ways.

".... they just want to let loose, relax and take a very passive role in their sexual practice. So they may seek out the services of a dominatrix, where they are at the mercy of this sex worker. I've had clients who seek out services where they get whipped, cuffed, put on a leash like a dog."

Beating others can also be part of this culture. There is violence lurking to the surface that can easily erupt when desires are denied.

I am not being moralistic here, but a climate of narcissism and living secret lives often desensitizes its practitioners leaving them little time to think of how their actions may affect others. (Or how the policies they promote impact on their customers or the poor!)

None of this context excuses anything that Strauss-Kahn may or may not have done, but what it does do is shine some light on a culture of aggressive power-driven hyper-sexuality that our media is often too hypocritical to investigate.


News Dissector Danny Schechter elaborates on this issue in his book, "The Crime of Our Time," and in a DVD extra to his film "Plunder - The Crime of Our Time" (PlunderTheCrimeOfOurTime.com). You may contact him at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Reader Supported News is the Publication of Origin for this work. Permission to republish is freely granted with credit and a link back to Reader Supported News.

 

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+11 # rbrooks 2011-05-19 15:32
Best analysis I have seen on DSK takedown:

http://www.opednews.com/articles/Dominique-Strauss-Kahn-was-by-Mike-Whitney-110519-58.html

It's not pretty but it sure as bloody hell is familiar.

rbrooks
 
 
+1 # acomfort 2011-05-19 21:12
Quote: "In some cases both tactics are deployed, as in the physical assassination of Bin Laden." . . . This should say the "alleged physical assassination" . . . as no evidence has yet been produced by the Obama administration that Bin Laden was assassinated. Has the government and the media ever lied to us?? Where are the weapons of mass destruction?? Must we still believe what the authorities say when no evidence is provided? Has Obama ever lied to us?

Here are a few.
"I'm going to close down Guantanamo!
. . . "Meetings will be more open to the public" . . . "When there is a tax bill being debated in congress you will know the names of the corporations that will benefit" . . . "As president I will ensure that financial rescue plans protect your money instead of enriching CEOs" . . . There are many more . . . Now why does the media take it as fact that he killed Bin Laden?

acomfort
 
 
+3 # acomfort 2011-05-19 21:14
"In some cases both tactics are deployed, as in the physical assassination of Bin Laden." . . . This should say the "alleged physical assassination" . . . as no evidence has yet been produced by the Obama administration that Bin Laden was assassinated. Has the government ever lied to us?? Must we still believe what the authorities say when no evidence is provided? Has Obama ever lied to us?

Here are a few.
"I'm going to close down Guantanamo!
. . . "Meetings will be more open to the public" . . . "When there is a tax bill being debated in congress you will know the names of the corporations that will benefit" . . . "As president I will ensure that financial rescue plans protect your money instead of enriching CEOs" . . . There are many more . . . Now why does the media take it as fact that he killed Bin Laden?

Otherwise; good article.
acomfort
 
 
+5 # Texas Aggie 2011-05-19 21:15
Talking with my French teachers i get the idea that the Droit du Seigneur is still part of the French culture. They seem to feel that there isn't an important difference between flirting and forcible rape. That stalking or sexual harassment is unacceptable isn't part of the French, and possibly European, culture.
 
 
-4 # acomfort 2011-05-19 21:18
"In some cases both tactics are deployed, as in the physical assassination of Bin Laden." . . . This should say the "alleged physical assassination" . . . as no evidence has yet been produced by the Obama administration that Bin Laden was assassinated. Has the government ever lied to us?? Must we still believe what the authorities say when no evidence is provided? Has Obama ever lied to us?

Here are a few.
"I'm going to close down Guantanamo!
. . . "Meetings will be more open to the public" . . . "When there is a tax bill being debated in congress you will know the names of the corporations that will benefit" . . . "As president I will ensure that financial rescue plans protect your money instead of enriching CEOs" . . . There are many more . . . Now why does the media take it as fact that he killed Bin Laden?

Otherwise, this is a good article.
acomfort
 
 
+11 # Byronator 2011-05-19 21:32
OK, so these arrogant, nauseating dicks are as perverted as the Roman Emperors in the twilight of their decaying empire. We're not amused.
 
 
+4 # touchetdooshie 2011-05-19 21:50
"...deeper context that is being ignored," oh, really? In your eagerness to seize what you perceive as an opportunity to tout your book you mislead us, and at great length. This story is not about the salacious adventurism of the powerful, it's about a criminal sexual assault on an unwilling person. That's all it's about.

Ref Mike Whitney's concern, the same stuff gets written up in my local newspaper with no more regard for innocence until proven guilty than in this case.
 
 
+1 # myrnah 2011-05-21 19:08
Right. A rape is not in the same category as ANY consensual sex scandal, no matter who the rapist is. It is a violent crime. It has more in common with other criminal violence than with patronizing call girls or can't-keep-it-y our-pants syndrome sex scandals or infidelity. The alleged perpetrator is not an unfaithful womanizer dealing with his financial anxieties, he's an accused violent offender. Like the burglar who beats you up when he robs your house, but richer.
 
 
+1 # Virginia 2011-05-19 21:56
The tainted jury syndrome reminds me of the bankster bribery where their lobbyists spend millions of dollars to get the ears of Congressional and state legislators... kinda "tit for tat" don't ya think...or is it called karma?
 
 
+13 # ER444 2011-05-20 00:09
This kind of treatment of Kahn and of any other person in any other case is shameful. He may be a strutting French "swinging dick" BUT we are a land of law AND one is innocent until proven guilty. Parading him unshaven in handcuffs before the wolfpack called the press is primitive and inexcusable. Comparing Kahn's case to Bradley Manning's is a little bit like comparing apples and oranges, but the principle is the same. They are both accused of a crime but have not been brought to trial and as such should, MUST be treated like innocent people until proven guilty. Even our constitutional expert for a president has proclaimed Mr. Manning to be guilty BEFORE a fair trial. This country used to be a beacon of truth, a role model, a bastion idealism for the rest of the world. Where did we go wrong. We are being wire tapped, x-rayed, spied on, and in many cases locked away without due process. The dismantling of the basic values we used to call "American" is very dangerous, and frightening. Dear politicians, take our country back from the powers lurking in the shadows. Support the likes of former and hopefully future Senator Feingold in his attempt to put some character back into our politics by turning down the pieces of silver offered by corporate America trying to by our elections. Help Eric Schneiderman go after the baron banks. Our nation needs to reach for "idealism" again.
 
 
+1 # Gurka 2011-05-22 00:36
@ER444: Thanks for your comment, I could not agree more. I'll send a copy of it to my friends.
And let's not forget that accusation of rape/sexual offences is a staple procedure in the CIA/FBI toolbox, when it comes to character assassination of people whom they for some reason do not like and want to destroy. It has been like that for decades. So it is all the more important not to buy into this old kind of accusation but to await a fair trial. If one can have that in the US these days...
 
 
+16 # alice indigo 2011-05-20 00:27
Comparing a shameful sexual attack to the actions of the Wall Street folks who brought our finances down is comparing apples to oranges. Please tell Mike Whitney not to trivialize what this woman has been through. It is one thing to rob me of my money, it is a whole other ballgame to attack my person, to rob me of my dignity. Never trivialize the lasting impact that this type of attack has on a person. It is one thing to fantasize sexual feelings or have an affair with a willing partner but to force yourself on an innocent person. No excuses. None. I commend the hotel personnel and the NY police for their fast action. If what I read in the paper is true, I hope this woman has the best lawyer in the world because a man this powerful and wealthy will pull every trick in the book to cover his alleged behavior.
 
 
+4 # HeidiStevenson 2011-05-20 01:05
My thanks to Danny Schechters insightful commentary.

The only thing that we actually know as true is that Strauss-Kahn has been accused of an act that many (most?) men in his position are probably guilty of.

But there's something we can be almost certain about: The accusation exists only because he ran afoul of the wrong folk. (Such as his call for a new world currency?)

Here's what's suspicious to me: If S-K is guilty of this particular instance, then he's almost certainly guilty of many others. As Schechter points out, such men feel entitled. So why pick him up now? Why treat him as public enemy #1?

Guilty or not, Strauss-Kahn is clearly the target of a hit. He knows it, and that's why he resigned from the IMF. It's his best chance of getting off. Guilty or not.
 
 
+8 # CL38 2011-05-20 08:38
Why pick him up now? Because he committed a crime against another person, in particular, a sexual crime against a woman.

What? He should be allowed to continue molesting and raping women in this country because he hasn't yet been prosecuted in other countries?

While you're probably accurate about his being targeted, this guy should be prosecuted for what he did. And our corrupt system of targeting people we don't like should also be "targeted" and exposed.
 
 
+2 # HeidiStevenson 2011-05-20 12:49
No one has suggested that he should be allowed to "continue" molesting or raping.

"...this guy should be prosecuted for what he did." Apparently, you've already convicted him.

You seem to miss a point I've made - that Strauss-Kahn's guilt or innocence is unlikely to have anything to do with whether he's convicted. That's a crime.

Certainly, if he's guilty, he should be convicted and imprisoned.
 
 
+1 # myrnah 2011-05-21 19:21
[quote name="CL38 And our corrupt system of targeting people we don't like should also be "targeted" and exposed.

As should the injustice of our bail system, which allows affluent or rich accused offenders get out of jail and await their trials in comfort while denying this to poor accused offenders just because they can't afford to pay. Even if both are accused rapists.
 
 
+1 # myrnah 2011-05-21 19:11
Most men rape any handy housekeeper when staying at a hotel? I hope not.
 
 
+1 # Tom Ganiatsos 2011-05-20 01:15
The word was "rutting" not "strutting".
 
 
+11 # rf 2011-05-20 03:30
Rape is real crime...Financi ally destroying a few million people is just good business!
 
 
+3 # Capn Canard 2011-05-20 05:48
rf, nice... Americans are about money above all.
 
 
+9 # fredboy 2011-05-20 04:08
A guy needs a new heart and the transplant doc gives him two choices: the heart of a 20 year old Olympic athlete or the heart of an overweight 50ish banker who smoked, drank, and had horrible eating habits. The guy immediately chose the banker's heart. When asked why, he replied "Because I want the heart that's never been used..."
 
 
+3 # bswein99 2011-05-20 04:37
This article is a perfect case of arguing by innuendo, by the accumulation of somewhat relevant data that makes it seem as if we're getting the inside skinny on the DSK case, and then transitioning into a completely unremarkable discussion of powerful men liking the services of prostitutes and strippers (Rick, I'm shocked to hear there's gambling going on in this establishment.. .) What very likely happened in the DSK case is a man who tends to be aggressive sexually had poor impulse control and attacked exactly the person most likely to report him--a (nearly) powerless woman. There was no inside dope from this or that agency; those folks always like to make us feel like they're the all-seeing eye, but I assure you, they could be entirely removed from the Spitzer/DSK/Joh n Edwards/Arnold/ B.Clinton equation, and we would still have sex crimes and sex scandals. No need to "tart" this story up with a Spy v. Spy subtext--it's bad enough just the way it is.
 
 
+13 # Sunnyduck 2011-05-20 04:39
Awww poor over stressed over worked over testosteroned financial warriors. The hormones made them do it. Their enemies set them up. They tripped on a rock. The sun got in their eyes... How could they possibly be expected to exercise self control? There is no comparison between a financial crime and raping a woman. Is DSK guilty of rape? We'll probably never know because the woman who made the complaint will be the one who is put on trial.
 
 
+5 # Fraenkel.1 2011-05-20 06:47
Nothing surprising as to what happended.

Priorities of our culture are, in no particular order, athletics, religion and sex, or at least as expressed in the media. It does keep people's minds off the real problems such as the economic meltdown of the US. As someone pointed out above the real crimes of the bankers
are that thay ruined the lives of millions of people.
 
 
+1 # CL38 2011-05-20 08:28
This is a good article, but even better is "Sex, Lies, Arrogance: What Makes Powerful Men Behave So Badly? in Time Magazine @ time.com.

This 'problem'is all about how boys are raised. They're taught from a very early age that they're "entitled" to special privileges, care-taking, services and servicing. See "Young White Men, Scared, Entitled, Cynical: A Deadly Combination" by Paul Kivel.

I'll continue comments in another post.
 
 
+3 # CL38 2011-05-20 08:30
Paul Kivel writes in particular about young white men in this country, but men in every country on this planet, whatever their culture,are taught “entitlement” .

“We have a very serious problem in this country. No, it's not welfare mothers, it's not recent immigrants, it's not African-America n or Latino men, it's not Arab terrorists-it is young white men. Most of the devastating violence we experience in our communities is committed by young white men between the ages of fifteen and thirty. What kind of violence am I referring to? Take your pick. Domestic violence, rape, acquaintance rape, incest, male on male fights, serial killings, racist hate crimes, gay-bashing, arson, campus riots such as recently occurred at Michigan State University, and barroom brawls. 95% of all violence in our society is committed by males, and although women, men of color, and white men of all ages certainly can be violent, the overwhelming majority of acts of violence can be traced to young white men.
 
 
-4 # Glenn Edwards 2011-05-20 09:55
racist drivel. Crime reports in most places I've lived in this country including my current residency in Santa Cruz California do not support your premise at all.
 
 
+1 # CL38 2011-05-20 08:30
And also from Paul Kivel:

"The violence of young men maintains a society in which some older white men have most of the social, political, and economic power and benefits, and the majority of us have to fight for the left-overs. Twenty percent of the population of the United States controls over 90% of the wealth. Some young white men will become part of the top 20%, but most won't. The sorting out process-the process of deciding which young white men will make it into the top 20% is what produces the cynicism, fear, and sense of entitlement which leads to violence. In response to this process boys choose strategies which they think will help them thrive, survive, or at least stay alive.
 
 
+3 # A. Zide 2011-05-20 09:54
Quoting CL38:
And also from Paul Kivel:

"The violence of young men maintains a society in which some older white men have most of the social, political, and economic power and benefits, and the majority of us have to fight for the left-overs. Twenty percent of the population of the United States controls over 90% of the wealth. Some young white men will become part of the top 20%, but most won't. The sorting out process-the process of deciding which young white men will make it into the top 20% is what produces the cynicism, fear, and sense of entitlement which leads to violence. In response to this process boys choose strategies which they think will help them thrive, survive, or at least stay alive.

Sorry, but as a 70 year old woman, I can attest to the same behavior in MEN over the years, period — white, young, black, hispanic , Indian etc. The sense of ENTITLEMENT in males in most cultures is pervasive, leading one to wonder if they have been raised by wolves... .
 
 
0 # CL38 2011-05-20 10:12
I completely agree. I was posting Paul Kivel's ideas about this issue. But the article "Sex, Lies, Arrogance: What Makes Powerful Men Behave So Badly? in Time Magazine @ time.com was written by Nancy Gibbs and is a much better analysis.
 
 
+5 # fredboy 2011-05-20 09:18
My grandfather told me a mob beat the hell out of and almost lynched a local banker during the Depression after learning he'd stolen some of the money he claimed had been "lost." Not suggesting that, but do think we should follow the dollars and learn where they really went.
 
 
+2 # Suzan 2011-05-20 15:29
I just adore Fredboy's comment.

We should follow the dollars and then beat hell out of those who stole them.

It's called Justice.

With a trial first.

And then punishment.
 
 
+7 # mtnview 2011-05-20 09:47
There is a key difference between Spitzer and DSK. Spitzer engaged in a commercial act with a willing partner in a capitalist system. DSK however saw himself as above the rules, able to exploit anyone and every woman with violence and with consequences. DSK is typical of the people running our country, our financial system, and our corporations. Its past time we applied serious consequences to actions that harm others. As most women know, if we are not safe, no one is safe.
 
 
+2 # G Lewis 2011-05-20 17:06
I was heartened to see a man challenging DKS' alleged behavior. I agree with some who are concerned that having anyone, of any class or group, be forced to do a "perp walk" significantly increases the likelihood that the accused will be assumed to be guilty.

However, as mtnview notes, the biggest issue here, to me, is that there's a huge difference between acting out sexually with prostitutes, and forcibly raping a woman who has almost no economic or social power, such as a maid. I'm sure that women who work in the sex industry certainly are exploited hugely (how many women would continue in the business if they could earn similar income elsewhere, or if they hadn't been victimized sexually at young ages?).

However, rape is an act of power, not of sexuality. As long as people act as if the two are similar, how can we possibly put an end to forcible "sexual" acts by powerful men against those they consider their inferiors (or hope to prove to themselves that they are superior and more powerful
than their victims?
 
 
0 # myrnah 2011-05-31 08:31
I see in today's news reports that another rich banker, an Egyptian this time, has just been arrested for sexual assault on a hotel maid in yet another NYC ritzy hotel, this time the Pierre Hotel. First of all, don't these guys read the news? Do they see the bodies of the women who work in expensive hotels as just another perk they're paying for? Perhaps the courage of the African hotel housekeeper who reported DSK will help others to speak up when they have been sexually abused on the job by hotel guests who feel entitled to make use of their bodies without their consent. It has already come out that DSK was accused of a similar crime in 2006 by a Mexican hotel maid, but that the police did not prosecute such a powerful man at that time. From the response to the petition in support of the African rape victim, her experience seems to have struck a nerve.
 

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