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Moore writes: "What would Martin Luther King, Jr. say about all of this today? How sad would he be that 63% of white men and 53% of white women voted for Donald J. Trump?"

The filmmaker Michael Moore, near a closed factory in Flint, Mich., where his father worked. (photo: Fabrizio Costantini/NYT)
The filmmaker Michael Moore, near a closed factory in Flint, Mich., where his father worked. (photo: Fabrizio Costantini/NYT)


What Would Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Say About Trump?

By Michael Moore, Michael Moore's Facebook Page

18 January 17

 

hat would Martin Luther King, Jr. say about all of this today? How sad would he be that 63% of white men and 53% of white women voted for Donald J. Trump? He certainly would have understood their pain and anger -- but would he have forgiven that they lashed out at their injustice by voting for a racist? Or by staying home? Or by leaving the presidential part on the ballot blank? And what about the minority of white people who voted for Hillary -- what's our responsibility in all this, for letting White America install Trump as our leader? Could we have done more? Should white supporters of Hillary have had their eyes more open, stepped outside their "Hillary-is-going-to-win!" bubble, turned off the TV and the pundits and the pollsters and paid some real attention? Are white liberals still listening to these hacks? Were white Hillary supporters really that bad at math that they couldn't read an electoral map? Were the white people in Wisconsin really that uncool and so disgustingly working class to the hipsters at the Brooklyn HQ that they didn't deserve a visit from their candidate for seven long months? Are white liberals still in some sort of denial that this is actually happening? Black people aren't in denial. They've been living with this hate and racism and neglect forever and are not at all in shock over what's happened. That white women gave Trump the boost he needed to put him over the Electoral top is no surprise to them. White liberals believed that white women were going to save us from the angry white men who were and are the bulk of Trump's army. That didn't happen. What would Dr. King say about all of this? What could he tell us to soothe our hurt and allay our fears? Would he lead us in the fight one more time, or would he just hang his head today and simply weep. Just when the road seemed so much much shorter it suddenly got longer. And meaner. And almost unnavigable. He can't help us now. White people saw to that. The choice to fight is now left in our hands. And if you are white, don't we have an actual RESPONSIBILITY to undo this horrible wrong committed by our white neighbors, family members, co-workers and classmates? Shouldn't every single one of us be in the streets of DC this Friday and Saturday, nonviolently and forcefully resisting this moral crime White America has committed? Don't you want every African American, Muslim, Mexican, every LGBTQ American, every disabled person and every woman who's been grabbed and assaulted and humiliated by men like Trump to know that this wasn't YOU, that YOU won't be silent, that YOU will protect them and defend them and MAKE THIS RIGHT? Does not every single white person on this Martin Luther King Day have a shared DUTY to get up, stand up, march, resist, oppose, obstruct and make your voice heard so that no more harm comes to those who aren't born white and straight and Christian? This isn't a choice. This isn't something you get to think about. This is the only way to redeem ourselves, to answer the cry from Dr, King from his grave to not let all that he did and all that those good people who can before us did go to waste. Our silence right now will end his dream for good, and end the dreams of those who struggle day to day and week to week to simply survive. White America gave the world Donald J. Trump. But I f the 40%+ of white people who didn't vote for him are willing to join with the 90%+ of Black America and the majority of other people of color who also didn't vote for him, then that makes us the majority. Right now. We hold the true power. Stop reading this. Use it.

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+16 # Bic Parker 2017-01-18 10:19
But I f the 40%+ of white people who didn't vote for him are willing to join with the 90%+ of Black America and the majority of other people of color who also didn't vote for him, then that makes us the majority.

Joined decades ago!
 
 
-14 # skylinefirepest 2017-01-18 12:39
And what would he say if the rest of the voters, and non-voters, wanted a woman who sold the access to her country for her personal benefit, Mr. Moore????
 
 
+1 # JCM 2017-01-18 17:29
He would have said that if you don't vote for her you will get a man that will sell access to his country, times ten, deny climate change, destroy government agencies that protect your money, the environment, our health and education. Who doesn't believe in the minimum wage, wants to increase the use of fossil fuels, thinks NATO needs to be reduced while bolstering Putin. You had your choice, what would you do now.
 
 
-1 # ericlipps 2017-01-21 14:04
You're overlooking something: Trump lost the popular election by 3 million (okay, 2.9 million) votes, but won anyway thanks to the Electoral College, which was deliberately designed to help not only small states but also slave states exercise disproportionat e power.

Down with this anachronism; let's go to a national popular vote!
 
 
+16 # reiverpacific 2017-01-18 11:26
I believe that pretty soon Latino-a citizens will be the majority of US voters, which is hopeful for some kind of balance.
The spawn of the overwhelmingly reactionary-ang ry-vengeful ex-Batista supporting Castro-hating Cuban refugees in Florida are now increasingly turning towards Liberalism -another good sign.
Hopefully with Drumpf's upcoming four years (if he makes it THAT long), it'll be the death-throes of angry, working-class white males voting against their own interests!
 
 
+5 # Billsy 2017-01-18 15:01
The opinions of many millennials gives me hope, although too many stayed home election day. I am still flabbergasted by the number of progressive friends who shilled for Hillary and continue to grasp any excuse for her loss such as this lame diversion of blaming Russian interference or the FBI's Cromey, while completely ignoring the DNC's machinations and undermining of Sanders throughout the primary campaign. Until we all can cease enabling neo-liberal politicians my expectations of Democrats remain low.
 
 
+5 # JCM 2017-01-18 17:57
Lets not forget the real reason Hillary and so many Democratic Senators and Congressmen Lost:
the Interstate Crosschecking System, voter disenfranchisem ent, gerrymandering, uncounted ballots, and unacceptable voting machines. This is happening in nearly every republican controlled state including the battleground states. Stop rationalizing about Hillary, it’s the republican’s cheating that will make it nearly impossible for Democrats to win in the future.
 
 
-1 # ericlipps 2017-01-21 14:05
Or to put it another way: WAAAA! Bernie didn't win! So Hillary, the Democratic Party and the country all deserved Donald Trump! So there!
 
 
-20 # 2wmcg2 2017-01-18 11:28
Michael Moore is too full of himself. His America is not shared by everyone.
 
 
+11 # Billsy 2017-01-18 14:57
Moore was the ONLY pundit I recall predicting that Trump might well win. He remains connected with working class voters in Michigan, one of the states where Clinton lost, while most Clinton supporters were completely oblivious. I'd say HIS America represents reality whereas yours is based on cherry picked op/eds and polls.
 
 
0 # newell 2017-01-19 11:11
And Lincoln's America was not shared by everyone--certa inly not the rich slave-owners. Neither was Andrew Jackson's America not shared by everyone--espec ially the Native Americans.
 
 
-39 # john rusnak 2017-01-18 11:53
If there is a person who can stop the fall of minorities in the U.S.A. it will be Trump.MLK was a Republican.He understood that Democrats from the founding of the party wanted a slave class.LBJ nearly guaranteed that with his Great Society program.Only now do minorities have a chance to break these bonds.Race baiters like Moore could care less about the real solutions.He pushes an agenda of hate.He really is a bastard.
 
 
+4 # JCM 2017-01-18 17:39
john rusnak: Can you substantiate anything you just stated. trump has picked people for his cabinet that will want to destroy the very agencies that can protect the American people from the very greedy. He wants to lower taxes on the rich, also known as trickle down economics that has created the greatest inequality in our history. You accuse Moore of race baiting. To this I must say that in comparison to trump you must be delusional.
 
 
+13 # bardphile 2017-01-18 12:37
Some combination of tribalism, fake news, alternative reality, anecdote, propaganda, outright lies, resentment and narrow self-interest managed to convince that white minority that the rest of us (ie, the majority) are low-information elitist "haters" and give them permission to elect this vulgar cretin. The answer to a political tantrum is not another political tantrum. We need to build bridges to the white working class, not mindlessly (in their perception) go after their candidate. I feel what you're feeling, Michael, and I agree that we need to oppose the Trump agenda where we can do so effectively. But the center-left coalition is NOT enough to advance the progressive agenda nationally without substantial support from the white working class. The headwinds generated by the electoral college, gerrymandering, overrepresentat ion of small republican states in the Senate, etc., are just too strong. We need to be smart and persuasive and be ready to compromise when necessary, not rigid and divisive and reflexively confrontational . My opinion.
 
 
+22 # librarian1984 2017-01-18 13:27
I think we do not need to cater to WHITE working class voters. The implication is that their concerns are different than black or Latino working class voters, which is a false divisiveness.

We need to promote a populist economic message that appeals to ALL workers. We need to support unions, healthcare, daycare, pay equity and workers' rights, which would benefit all workers regardless of ethnicity or gender.

There will be things on which we cannot agree but we can and should unite to advance economic justice.
 
 
+3 # bardphile 2017-01-18 16:35
Sure. I was assuming a shared perspective that most non-white voters were already receptive to progressive candidates.
 
 
+1 # librarian1984 2017-01-18 20:13
As Lakoff reminds us, we have to be careful of the framing and the words we use. Progressives are for workers and families, without qualifiers.

I don't think it's safe to assume non-whites will vote for Democrats. It will be interesting to see what they do. Many stayed home this time. Is there a chance they might contemplate a third party, a minority coalition?

I think everything is on the table at this point.
 
 
+22 # librarian1984 2017-01-18 13:20
I think a more interesting question, Michael, is what would MLK Jr have thought of Hillary Clinton.

King became a threat to DS when he started taking on the war machine, and I can't believe he would have been any bigger fan of Democrat wars than he was of Republican ones, or the Clinton-led neoliberalism that resulted in mass incarceration, sentencing inequities and private prisons .. whose horrors have fallen so inequitably on minority citizens.

I believe he would have been at Standing Rock with the water protectors and Bernie. (Where was Hillary?) He would have been marching with BLM instead of denigrating its members.

I believe he would have endorsed Bernie Sanders, and maybe staged a peaceful protest when it became clear the primary was crooked.

Maybe he would even have run for president. Wouldn't that have been something?
 
 
+9 # mashiguo 2017-01-18 13:35
Yeah...
As I recall Dr. King was vigorously and vociferously opposed to the Vietnam war.
Do you think he would have had a kind word for Hillary and her incessant belligerency of her war mongering?

Let us stipulate to the fact that Trump is lower than the slime mold growing on the fecal residue of pond scum. Does that make raining death and destruction all over the world on innocent people preferable?

I'm pretty sure Dr. King would not have been able to stomach much of anything about the current state of American politics, and might well have even now be calling on his spiritual training to 'survive' it:
"Wherefore I praised the dead which are already dead more than the living which are yet alive."

But as far as this article is concerned, using a great man like Dr. King as a cover and an excuse to sling one's own mud is unforgivable.
 
 
0 # Jim Rocket 2017-01-18 17:23
There is no reason to think that there will be a reduction in killing under Trump. Take a look at his cabinet. We will all be fortunate if the killing remains at the same level.
 
 
-3 # JCM 2017-01-18 17:49
I like to place this conversation here (from above) for librarian1984 and mashiguo
From skylinefirepest
And what would he say if the rest of the voters, and non-voters, wanted a woman who sold the access to her country for her personal benefit, Mr. Moore????
He would have said that if you don't vote for her you will get a man that will sell access to his country, times ten, deny climate change, destroy government agencies that protect your money, the environment, our health and education. Who doesn't believe in the minimum wage, wants to increase the use of fossil fuels, and thinks NATO needs to be reduced while bolstering Putin, destabilize the world and creating a nuclear arms race. You had your choice, what would you do now.
 
 
+12 # djnova50 2017-01-18 13:48
Mr. Moore, since Martin Luther King, Jr. was a minister, above all else, I do not believe he would treat President-elect Trump with hate. Not only would he teach Trump about peace, love, tolerance, he would recruit others to teach the same to members of Congress.

On top of that, he would probably feel that the rest of America might need some guidance as well.
 
 
+8 # DongiC 2017-01-18 15:19
I think MLKing would have excoriated the federal government for the long trail of blood and tears it left in its wake from Iraq to Libya and Afghanistan to Yemen, from Honduras to Grenada to Nicragua, from Laos and Vietnam to Somalia and Sudan. He considered the US an agent of violence and I am sure that he would have been out in the streets leading a protest. We need him so much.
 
 
0 # dbrize 2017-01-18 15:50
Channeling the dead is always fun. They say whatever we want.

What we do know for fact is that MLKIII met with Trump and called it "a very constructive meeting".

Counterpunch raises some interesting thoughts about Trumps enemies. Thoughts that have been rejected by neoliberals masquerading as progressives.

http://www.counterpunch.org/2017/01/18/the-extraordinary-array-of-those-questioning-trumps-legitimacy-and-their-various-reasons/
 
 
+1 # Jim Rocket 2017-01-18 17:36
Your point seems to hinge on the concept that Trump is some sort of good guy with a plan to make things better. He's not. It is only by constant pressure on him and his "Cabinet of Deplorables" that anything good will come from this.
 
 
+5 # Lise 2017-01-18 17:07
He would say, "Let's reach out to our next President. He is our brother."

I imagine he would form a wonderful relationship with the new President, and appeal to the nation to cease it's hatred and riven-ness; to stop the tomfoolery of an "Us vs. Him" mentality.

He would forefront the plight of the American black which became highlighted in President Obama's term.

Let's stop pretending, folks, that it was all skittles and beer under Obama, or that it would have been under Mrs. Clinton.

She lost the election. Now get on with it.

I'm not copying Dr. King's verbiage, but THAT'S what he'd say.
 
 
0 # Winston Smith II 2017-01-19 07:57
Lise -- you may be right. Trump has a vulnerability (if it can be called that) in that he wants very badly to be accepted by celebrities. MLK was a celebrity. MLK was also very good at reading people. I think he would assess Trump and see how to get close to him. Trump would like that. He'd feel flattered. Trump's weakness is actually good for someone like. Trump does not owe anything to the ideological hardline racists like McConnell, Ryan, the FBI, CIA, and entrenched republicans and democrats. He actually is outside of them and he needs popular and populist leaders like MLK.

But that is just wishful thinking.
 
 
+1 # newell 2017-01-19 11:05
Or he would defend the threat to the poor. MLK was no friend or "brother" with the devil. And MLK was a follower of Jesus--who was not a big fan of billionaires. Nor would he have embraced Hitler or Stalin or Andrew Jackson.

But I think he would have tried to find common ground between left and right.
 
 
+1 # Winston Smith II 2017-01-19 07:54
Of course, had King and very many other civil rights activsts not been murdered in the FBI's COINTELPRO operation, things in the US would be very different than they are now. It is not likely that Reagan would have been able to launch his campaign in Philadelphia Mississippi, right where three civil righs workers were murdered. Reagan and the "southern strategy" was a very deliberate effort to reverse the civil rights gains made by MLK and many others. The fact that they were all dead made it possible to trample on their legacy.

So it is hard to imagine what MLK would say to Trump, since it is likely that there would be no Trump if King had not been murdered by the FBI and what came to be called the Deep State.
 
 
-1 # newell 2017-01-19 10:55
Well, Martin Luther King was religious, so I imagine he would say:

I had a dream, more of a nightmare really, that the anti-Christ was president.
 
 
0 # Depressionborn 2017-01-20 12:30
RE: hat would Martin Luther King, Jr. say about all of this today

I think he would help us take the country back. It belongs to the people you knw
 

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