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Hayden writes: "The relationship between the incoming Trump administration and the American intelligence community is playing out like one of those 1950s Saturday matinee serials - 'Lost Planet,' 'Commando Cody' and the like - where we are left perilously on the edge of our seat at the end of every episode."

Former CIA head Michael Hayden at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee on May 18, 2006. (photo: Joe Marquette/Bloomberg)
Former CIA head Michael Hayden at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee on May 18, 2006. (photo: Joe Marquette/Bloomberg)


Intelligence Community Isn't Intimidated by Trump

By Michael Hayden, The Hill

13 January 17

 

he relationship between the incoming Trump administration and the American intelligence community is playing out like one of those 1950s Saturday matinee serials — “Lost Planet,” “Commando Cody” and the like — where we are left perilously on the edge of our seat at the end of every episode.

To play it back, this week's episode began with this 140-character beauty:

Note the near sneering quotation marks around intelligence and the smothering of culpability for the hacks by prefacing Russian involvement with "so-called."

Then there was the (untrue) ploy that the meeting had been moved because intelligence officials weren't ready.

The president-elect followed this up a day later by suggesting that he had sought a second opinion:

The relationship between the incoming Trump administration and the American intelligence community is playing out like one of those 1950s Saturday matinee serials — “Lost Planet,” “Commando Cody” and the like — where we are left perilously on the edge of our seat at the end of every episode.

To play it back, this week's episode began with this 140-character beauty:

Note the near sneering quotation marks around intelligence and the smothering of culpability for the hacks by prefacing Russian involvement with "so-called."

Then there was the (untrue) ploy that the meeting had been moved because intelligence officials weren't ready.

The president-elect followed this up a day later by suggesting that he had sought a second opinion:

Now, to be accurate, Assange's actual response to the question posed to him by Trump acolyte Sean Hannity — "Our source is not the Russian government and it is not a state party” — was narrowly crafted, and hardly the categorical denial advertised in the tweet. Besides, Assange is a known liar, and how would he know the ultimate provenance of the emails, anyway?

So why create an apparent equivalency between his views and those of the American intelligence community? "Here you go, America. Two choices. Pick one."

And all of that is on top of the transition team's original response to the intelligence community's Russia hacking charge: "These are the same people who said Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction,"they said, citing a signal failure of the community 14 years ago.

In a way, this reminds me of trash talk, the way it is used by an athlete to intimidate an opponent. Think of an NFL cornerback who knows he's going to be thrown at a lot come Sunday trying to get into the head of his opponent. We've seen the president-elect use this as a candidate, with his ad hominem put-downs of Little Marco, Lyin' Ted, Crooked Hillary and "the dishonest media."

But it's quite another thing to adopt a (successful) campaign tool and use it as a mode of governance, especially with your own intelligence community. It does help explain, though, the president-elect’s keeping intelligence off balance with zingers like this on New Year's Eve, "And I also know things that other people don't know, and so they cannot be sure of the situation."

I know of no other historical example of this, at least on this scale. It may be that the president-elect can't help himself, that this is the only technique he knows when faced with unpleasant information, and that we shouldn't read much more into it than that.

The relationship between the incoming Trump administration and the American intelligence community is playing out like one of those 1950s Saturday matinee serials — “Lost Planet,” “Commando Cody” and the like — where we are left perilously on the edge of our seat at the end of every episode.

To play it back, this week's episode began with this 140-character beauty:

Note the near sneering quotation marks around intelligence and the smothering of culpability for the hacks by prefacing Russian involvement with "so-called."

Then there was the (untrue) ploy that the meeting had been moved because intelligence officials weren't ready.

The president-elect followed this up a day later by suggesting that he had sought a second opinion:

Now, to be accurate, Assange's actual response to the question posed to him by Trump acolyte Sean Hannity — "Our source is not the Russian government and it is not a state party” — was narrowly crafted, and hardly the categorical denial advertised in the tweet. Besides, Assange is a known liar, and how would he know the ultimate provenance of the emails, anyway?

So why create an apparent equivalency between his views and those of the American intelligence community? "Here you go, America. Two choices. Pick one."

And all of that is on top of the transition team's original response to the intelligence community's Russia hacking charge: "These are the same people who said Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction,"they said, citing a signal failure of the community 14 years ago.

In a way, this reminds me of trash talk, the way it is used by an athlete to intimidate an opponent. Think of an NFL cornerback who knows he's going to be thrown at a lot come Sunday trying to get into the head of his opponent. We've seen the president-elect use this as a candidate, with his ad hominem put-downs of Little Marco, Lyin' Ted, Crooked Hillary and "the dishonest media."

But it's quite another thing to adopt a (successful) campaign tool and use it as a mode of governance, especially with your own intelligence community. It does help explain, though, the president-elect’s keeping intelligence off balance with zingers like this on New Year's Eve, "And I also know things that other people don't know, and so they cannot be sure of the situation."

I know of no other historical example of this, at least on this scale. It may be that the president-elect can't help himself, that this is the only technique he knows when faced with unpleasant information, and that we shouldn't read much more into it than that.

In any event, the intelligence folks didn't seem to be intimidated. They briefed the president-elect and his team last Friday, saying they had high confidence that the Russians had hacked American political entities, planted the stolen data in selected websites, worked to punish and cripple Hillary Clinton and then came to favor the election of Donald Trump.

A public report was issued with identical conclusions, but with a thin evidentiary stack under each of them. Even though a disappointing level of proof was made public, it seems that the data in the actual classified briefing was strong enough. Team Trump, despite the earlier taunting, didn't challenge the data.

Instead, it pivoted. The team transformed the issue to a generalized "cyber thing", emphasizing that "Russia, China, other countries, outside groups and people are consistently trying to break through the cyber infrastructure of our government institutions, businesses and organizations."

All of which is true and important, of course, but the point of the briefing was less "we got a cyber problem" than "we really got a Russia problem."

And that aspect went noticeably unremarked on by anyone in Trump Tower. In fact, Trump’s aides falsely claimed on the weekend talk shows that the intelligence briefers had confirmed that the Russians had failed to influence the outcome of the election, a conclusion that the intelligence chiefs explicitly avoided as being beyond the purpose and means of their craft.

So, as this episode of the ongoing serial ends, we are (per the genre) once again in peril, wondering if, when and how the incoming team will process the kind of unwelcome information that intelligence will routinely present it.

As the credits start to roll and the suspense builds, we are learning that the president-elect appears unmoved on the subject. With no reference to what he may or may not have heard the day before, he tweeted on Saturday that, "Only stupid people, or fools, would think that it [a good relationship with Russia] is bad."

A tweet, a taunt and an unmoved policy, all in one.

Then Wednesday, angered by the publication of some vile (and unproven) opposition research that has been rattling around Washington for weeks, the president-elect blamed his intelligence community and seemed to say that it was Nazi-like.

As a kid I couldn't wait for the next episode.

Maybe not this time, though. This may be one serial that doesn't have a happy ending.

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+18 # librarian1984 2017-01-13 13:26
I request that rsn put a picture of a soothing landscape or mischievous kittens at the head of a Hayden article or, better yet, don't run any more.

I have a visceral urge to regurgitate on seeing this repulsive individual.
 
 
+2 # CDMR 2017-01-13 20:32
librarian -- my feelings exactly. I will be so happy to see all of these "intelligence community" types gone. Most of Obama's intelligence chiefs are hold-overs from the Bush regime. Hayden came into the NSA in the 90s under Clinton. All of these people have invested their lives in the Bush-Clinton political machine. They know things are now changing and their life's work may be thrown in the trash. Trump's people will be different. He's not part of the Bush - Clinton political team.

I welcome the change. The 90s up to 2016 have been the worst years for democracy and human rights in the US. Hayden is right at the center of the destruction of our democracy.
 
 
-17 # Robbee 2017-01-13 22:06
Quoting librarian1984:
I request that rsn put a picture of a soothing landscape or mischievous kittens at the head of a Hayden article or, better yet, don't run any more.

I have a visceral urge to regurgitate on seeing this repulsive individual.

- we'll look into it!

while you're at it? any more requests?
 
 
-5 # Jaax88 2017-01-14 00:51
So Hayden''s looks not being up to standards reminds me trump bashing his only female primary opponent. Oh dear!

There is an interesting piece about the "only Stein progressives" and other some other leftist progressives and Russian games. It suggests Russia has been playing some progressives or taken them as useful idiots. Not saying I know enough to vouch for the article, but there are significant facts set out that give weight to the claims.
 
 
+7 # HowardMH 2017-01-14 11:03
Go here and join the protest group against Trump. Even without much publicity over 675,000 have accessed the site. We are just getting started.

Sat. Morning update the new number that have accessed the site is 1.7 MILLION. This is OVER a million more in JUST 2 Days. Thank you Rachael Maddow and all the people so very much. A week later there are OVER 3000 Groups organized.

http://www.occupy.com/article/indivisible-practical-guide-resisting-trump-agenda#sthash.JrOQ45dY.dpbs

Thank Daily Kos and go here to get the phone number of ALL in congress and CALL, CALL, CALL.

http://www.dailykos.com/stories/2017/1/3/1616776/-The-simplest-resistance-tactic-is-right-at-your-fingertips-and-it-only-takes-a-minute

It just keeps growing and growing. Check out the Daily Kos article on Indivisible
 
 
+4 # librarian1984 2017-01-14 12:48
There are marches in 40+ cities tomorrow, Sunday 15 January, for healthcare .. though, knowing the liberals, the message will be diluted by signs for 101 causes, bless their unfocused pointy little heads.

Let's do try to stay on topic. There will be PLENTY of protests. This one is about healthcare. Let's see some great signs. Let's make the news.

This is Sanders' first show of bodies. We can scare the hell out of DC tomorrow. Show up.

For information go to BernieSanders.com

See you there!
 
 
+2 # librarian1984 2017-01-15 16:37
The rally in Philadelphia was a mixed crowd of about 600-700 people and covered by local media.

Sen. Bob Casey, one of thirteen Dems who voted against Sanders' amendment allowing people to purchase prescription drugs from Canada, was the first speaker. About twenty people booed him. He spoke to a woman carrying a sign against the thirteen and told her he was working with Sanders on a number of issues.

The woman had heard from friends at a rally in NJ that 2/3 of the crowd booed their senators, Booker and Menendes, who also voted against the amendment.

Then-Sen. Barack Obama hung Clinton's Iraq vote around her neck like an albatross. I think a few senators ambitions may have just died this week, though they don't yet know it.

This .. on the verge of millions losing their insurance.

This is not the way to win back progressives. Oh no, it is not. 2018, DP. Tick tock.

People seemed excited about the protest in Washington on January 21st. I think that is the place to be.

About 8000 attended Sanders' rally in MI.
 
 
+7 # wrknight 2017-01-14 12:43
Hayden and Clapper: birds of a feather.
 
 
+6 # wrknight 2017-01-14 12:47
Between Clapper and Hayden, I'm beginning to have hope for Trump.
 
 
+31 # DongiC 2017-01-13 13:57
Hayden is an old time intelligence operative. You gather material to make America safer assuming our leaders are on our side. With Trumpster you never know where he stands and whose side is he on? Very, very confusing.
 
 
+17 # Radscal 2017-01-13 19:07
Hayden is the main operative behind decades of illegal and unconstitutiona l surveillance of law-abiding US citizens and both individuals and the political leadership of not only our "adversaries," but also our allies.
 
 
+5 # Greg Scott 2017-01-14 15:23
I have no great sympathy or trust for US intelligence agencies but Trump is just a blatant liar.

Not sure why they would put it out there if there wasn't something to it. If the agencies really are corporate capitalist tools, why would they bother...ultima tely Trump will be a corporate capitalist tool.

I have no great love or trust for Putin and Russia. He just reads to me like an old style Russian dictator. Just because we do not like our intelligence agencies does not mean that Putin is somehow our friend. Russia, with or without Communism, is pretty much Russia. They want to expand their sphere of influence and I don't see much in that for ordinary Americans...or ordinary Russians for that matter.

By the same token, I don't see ANY good in a Trump administration for ordinary Americans. Outrage is pretty much missing the point. Take back legislatures, reverse gerrymandering and get some real progressives in charge...don't care if they're Dems or Indies for No Party affiliation. It's the policies that matter.

Keep fighting among ourselves and we just make it easy for the oligarchs.
 
 
+7 # Radscal 2017-01-14 16:32
"If the agencies really are corporate capitalist tools, why would they bother...ultima tely Trump will be a corporate capitalist tool."

And then you answer your question:

"Keep fighting among ourselves and we just make it easy for the oligarchs."

Since no evidence has been presented that Russia, or Russians, let alone Putin himself had anything to do with the documents published by Wikileaks, your negative stereotyping of Russia is irrelevant, but frankly frightening. I had hoped that the one positive thing from HRC losing was the cancelation of Cold War II and the march to war with Russia. This CIA narrative is keeping those plans alive, and that is terrifying.

The now infamous 25-page CIA/NSA/DHS "Report" on alleged Russian hacking says this:

"Disclosures through WikiLeaks did not contain any evident
forgeries."

They admit that they could find no false information. But again, we are only discussing who might have leaked or hacked the information, and not the content.

Which again, is the answer to your question.
 
 
+4 # Greg Scott 2017-01-14 21:45
I think my point was pretty much that...

It's all bread...well, not much bread...but plenty of circus.

I'm neither for nor against Russia, but I certainly don't trust them just because neo-cons are against them.

What really matters are domestic policies that really work for ordinary Americans. If we made a serious commitment to becoming energy independent with renewable sources, a lot of our foreign policy nightmares would be irrelevant.

People criticized Bernie for lack of foreign policy but if you really followed his domestic agenda, so much of our big oil driven intervention would be meaningless.
 
 
+6 # Radscal 2017-01-14 23:20
If we go to war with Russia, domestic energy production will be the least of our problems. Well, except for finding firewood to heat our caves.

But, one of the ways I don't trust Putin is that he could be in on the circus, too. The psychopathic 0.01% who are pulling the strings here, could well be puling strings in Russia, too.

Given what we do see though, it certainly appears that Russia, China and a few other countries are working together to defend themselves against decades of AAZ Empire expansionism in both wars and economics.

Clearly, in terms of body count, the US is, as MLK noted 1/2 century ago, "the greatest purveyor of violence in the world."
 
 
0 # Greg Scott 2017-01-17 02:31
Once you start a fight, especially with nuclear weapons in the mix, it tends to take on it's own life...human nature.

Trick is not to start the fight. As far as China goes, they're pretty much kicking the US butt right now economically.

I'm sorry but I refuse to romanticize Russia. I think I agree with the old school Revolutionaries I met in Cuba in 2000 who had gone to the Soviet Union for cultural exchange. They thought that the Russians got Communism wrong, that they were too dark about it...and these were believers in Communism.

(When we're counting bodies, don't forget Stalin's contribution.)

The American character is not monolithic. There is a deep seated regard for the idea of shared community among a lot of different groups of people. I have worked in shops and factories...sin ce shipped to low-wage countries...wit h a lot of so-called blue collar Americans and they were very decent people. Some became life-long friends. But often, their cultural prejudices get used by monied interests for their own ends.

Countries have interests, and our legitimate ones may not be the same as Russia's, or China's for that matter. I don't see Trump owing money to Russian investors...of whatever character and if it's true...as a good thing for an American president.

I look around and I see a lot of people who have lost hope, and pride in what they do. I don't really think a Putin-Trump bromance will do much to change that.
 
 
+1 # Radscal 2017-01-17 17:11
Of course, the Soviet Union "got communism wrong." They became a totalitarian regime run by and for the few. Quite the opposite of a Marxist, stateless communism.

But of course, the USSR has been gone for a quarter century now. What remains are the nuclear weapons, and a firm resolve NOT to be invaded again.

Yes, a lot of USians have lost hope and pride in what they do. This is true from what I read in much of the world. And that is totally appropriate response to the global fascist world order that has been growing for decades (with bipartisan resolve in the US).

I do NOT trust Trump. I do not believe him to be "an outsider." His persona was created by the corporate media over the past 30 years. His wealth comes from Wall Street and Organized Crime. He is beloved by Netanyahu and the most right-wing Zionists.

And I certainly don't believe there is any "bromance" between Trump and Putin. The Zionists HATE Russia, and have since their founding in the late 19th century.

Buying into the CIA narrative about Trump being a "Putin Puppet" is dangerous because it excuses "liberals" to be pro-war against Russia.

I am more certain by the day that putting him in the White House has been the goal of the psychopathic 0.01% from the start. Insuring that HRC took the Democratic Nomination was part of that goal.

And therefore, war with Russia may well be in the cards anyway.
 
 
+1 # Greg Scott 2017-01-18 02:14
Rad...

I'm mostly with you on all of this...

The last little bit though, I think that Hillary's team was just incompetent.

Just had a thought, I was considering the idea that the 0.01% really wanted war with Russia. It occurred to me that scaring people with Russia is far more effective for them than actually going to war. That they could not control for their own ends.

On a more fun topic...I just got back from the UK playing with the band Breakwater that I joined in 1975. You can search it on Youtube, it's the funky one. Not sure if I said before but that is a neighborhood Philly R&B/Funk band that started writing it's own material and did 2 albums on Arista that did pretty well in 1979 and 1980.

Band broke up in 1981...bands do that...but we got back together in 2009. Older and grayer but still had the feeling.

Well, seems like a lot of people in Britan had been big fans and we hooked up a couple of concerts over there. Amazing... A couple of thousand fans had been waiting for us for 35 years. Did a live 'unplugged' performance on BBC radio. Band killed but I didn't get more than about 7 or 8 hours of sleep in 5 days.

Totally worth it. I guess sometimes there are second acts in life.

Sweet...take care.
 
 
+28 # economagic 2017-01-13 21:15
I have not felt like our leaders were on our side in at least fifty years.
 
 
+6 # wrknight 2017-01-14 12:50
Quoting DongiC:
Hayden is an old time intelligence operative. You gather material to make America safer assuming our leaders are on our side. With Trumpster you never know where he stands and whose side is he on? Very, very confusing.
What on earth makes anyone willing to assume our leaders are on our side?
 
 
+10 # Winston Smith II 2017-01-13 14:12
This Hayden guy needs to study the US constitution and general theory about democratic governments. Hayden and all the rest of the so-called "intelligence community" works for the presidents and is subject to congressional oversight. They are not permitted to do ANYTHING on their own and they should not speak unless asked to.

The arrogance of the "intelligence community" is just disgusting to see. Lots of people have called Trump a fascist, but the real fascism in the United States is centered in the "intelligence community." These are the ministries that make up much of the Deep State. They work for corporations, banks, and foreign governments, not for the US. They are all military institutions. Hayden above is a general in the US Air Force (now retired).

Hayden, Brennan, Clapper and the rest are just dead-enders. They want to make some noise and strutt their stuff before they all leave government and go to work int he weapons industry for millions of dollars a year. Ignore them. They are noisy and ugly dead-enders.
 
 
-3 # olpossum 2017-01-13 19:39
Nice syntax, "Winston".
 
 
-14 # ericlipps 2017-01-13 21:18
Would you be saying all this if it were a President-elect Hillary Clinton under fire? And if not, why not?
 
 
+5 # wrknight 2017-01-14 12:53
Absolutely! It doesn't matter who's president, the deep state will control them.
 
 
+2 # Caliban 2017-01-14 00:28
Hayden, the intelligence community, and dozens more government advisory agencies work for the President -- but not as his slaves.

PLease recall that in Trump we have a new thing in US governmental history -- a President who has never before held either an elective position in government (or any government position for that matter).

Hayden and Donald's other advisors must of necessity go that extra advisory mile to guard against the pitfalls of presidential procedural ignorance and arrogance.
 
 
+9 # wrknight 2017-01-14 12:56
They sure as hell didn't work for JFK.
 
 
+6 # librarian1984 2017-01-14 13:07
The intel agencies supposedly work at the pleasure of the president. It shouldn't matter if he calls them names or humiliates them publicly. POTUS is under no obligation to buy them dinner or tell them they're pretty. What are they, snowflake princesses?

Since when does the president have to show THEM the proper respect or risk unsupported defamatory material coming out?

Good manners are nice, but toward the nation's propagandists and assassins, and a prerequisite for them to do their fracking job? I don't think so!

Are we not seeing the CIA blackmail a president right before our eyes? People may not like Trump -- but is this acceptable behavior from a (supposedly) government group with an unlimited budget and no accountability -- toward our elected executive?

Aren't we watching, in real time, the CIA go rogue? I hope Trump splinters those m-f-ers and farms them out to scattered DMVs across the land until allowed, if they show the proper gratitude, to retire without prosecution.

By 'guard against .. presidential ignorance" are you saying the intel agencies 'know better' and should act against presidential orders? Or should they just release more tapes .. and to what end? To install Pence or even Ryan?

I've taped Pompeo's hearing but haven't watched it yet. Whose man is he? What will the organization pull on him? Is it justified because they don't like Trump?

What about POTUS 46, with whom you might agree? Is that ok too?
 
 
-2 # Jaax88 2017-01-15 21:03
Can't agree with your premise. POTUS is not a king or dictator (yet.) Fortunately the American people do not have to bend down and OBEY any politicians.
 
 
+5 # citizenpaine 2017-01-14 10:54
...but the real fascism in the United States is centered in the "intelligence community."

I absolutely agree. I've often wondered how such a nice guy as Obama (and he really is a nice guy) could pursue such bloodthirsty and entropic military policies. I've concluded that he simply has implicit faith in his "intelligence" briefers, and through him he has been manipulated into implementing the Deep State's "war is good" perspective. Now they have to deal with Trump, who is rightfully suspicious. Whoa---loose cannon! Hope he knows how to maintain his personal security.
BTW, I don't like Trump; he's NOT a nice guy. Maybe it just takes one to know one, but Hayden is so obviously a snake that it's amazing he's so "wholesomely" accepted by the press.
 
 
0 # Anonymot 2017-01-15 14:55
Obama was controlled from Day 1, but the foreign policy was not his thing. It was not much Hillary's thing, either, but since the Intelligence Community owned the Clintons since Bill signed in, she said whatever she was told to say. So they had 2 rubber stampers and an aquiescent military and "security" apparatus at their command. That didn't happen yesterday. Read THE DEVIL'S CHESSBOARD, Talbot, a brilliant, deeply document about how we got here!
 
 
-2 # mmc 2017-01-14 11:11
Now we know: Adolph survived the bunker and now call s himself Mr. Smith.
 
 
+2 # mmc 2017-01-14 11:27
Does the name Lt. Calley mean anything to you?
 
 
+7 # Radscal 2017-01-14 17:03
Yeah, it means "fall guy."

Though even at that, he did end up with a minimal sentence. Literally a few days in prison and then 3 1/2 years of house arrest.

As Nick Turse made clear in his fully substantiated book, "Kill Anything that Moves," the order to commit such atrocities (or at least to permit them) came from very high up.
 
 
-2 # Jaax88 2017-01-15 20:52
Everyone with an interest in world affairs after WWII knows that following an illegal military order (Calley) is a punishable crime. Hardly a fall guy.
 
 
0 # Radscal 2017-01-16 00:49
Everyone with an interest in the history of the Vietnam War knows what I wrote is exactly true. Most of the atrocities were covered up, and My Lai would have been too, had not a brave enlisted man gone to Sy Hersh. Then Major Colin Powell had already buried the report, as usual.

Because that one horrible atrocity became public knowledge, the Brass had to make a show court martial of Calley and a few others.

And again, as I wrote, even with that, Calley was the only one sentenced, and he spent a couple days in jail, and was ultimately pardoned.

The Pentagon and White House did NOT want the genie to come out of that bottle, since atrocities were so widespread, so they presented it as a "few bad apples." i.e.. a fall guy.

Perhaps you should look up what a "fall guy" is.
 
 
+17 # Winston Smith II 2017-01-13 14:40
Hayden says, "Now, to be accurate, Assange's actual response to the question posed to him by Trump acolyte Sean Hannity — "Our source is not the Russian government and it is not a state party” — was narrowly crafted, and hardly the categorical denial advertised in the tweet. Besides, Assange is a known liar, and how would he know the ultimate provenance of the emails, anyway?"

The facts are that Assange said as clearly and as precisely as humanly possible in language that Russia was not the source of the emails published on WikiLeaks. Assange is NOT known to be a liar; rather Hayden, Clapper, Brennan, and the whole intelligence community are known to be liars. It is quite possible for Assange to know the entire provenance of the emails. If they came from a single leaker inside the Podesta camp or inside the NSA itself, then Assange would know a single person collected the emails and gave them to him.

Hannity is not a Trump acolyte. I don't know what he is but it is not that.

Hayden's statement is so irresponsible that it should be enough to get him fired. He'll be gone is a week, so maybe we just have to endure his ravings for the time being.
 
 
+50 # mashiguo 2017-01-13 15:06
Assange is a known liar?
Coming from the US intelligence community?

Does anyone else see the irony in this?

As for the intelligence community being unafraid?
Why would they be?
They have already gotten away with murder.

...no happy ending indeed.
 
 
+5 # kath 2017-01-13 18:33
In my opinion the "intelligence community" should be intimidated by Donald Trump. Like it or not, he is the next president. It's to be hoped that Trump is not intimidated by our swollen spider web of spy shops and Homeland "Security" honchos, whether they clumsily leak a tape of his alleged escapades (a threat if I ever saw one) or not.
 
 
+14 # Jim Rocket 2017-01-13 21:22
There are no "good guys" in this scenario.
 
 
+15 # dandevries 2017-01-13 19:07
And we're supposed to believe anything Michael Hayden says? Give me a break!
 
 
+20 # acomfort 2017-01-13 19:13
Hayden States:
"Assange is a known liar, and how would he know the ultimate provenance of the emails, anyway?"

Maybe someone at RSN will list in detail Assange's lie or lies?
Alongside of that, list the "American intelligence community's lies.

Do that and Assange will come out most trustworthy.

Or look at how many times the American intelligence community has been wrong compared to how many times Wikileaks has been wrong. You should get the same results . . . Wikileaks is more trustworthy than the American intelligence community.

I await your response.
 
 
+17 # Noni77 2017-01-13 19:43
General Hayden was put in charge of NSA in the 1990's after the Iron Curtain fell to eviscerate their numbers. Instead, a plan was hatched that would be known as "9/11". His deputy, Barbara McNamara would NOT go along with the False Flag attack so she was "moved" to GCHQ in London and replaced by the criminal Bill Black Jr., who had no problem like Hayden, murdering thousands of Americans to keep the power and budget of the Cold War Intelligence Community they were accustomed to. So the traitorous, self-serving IC is NOT afraid of Trump? They're lying or planning to assassinate.
 
 
+3 # ericlipps 2017-01-13 21:20
You have what evidence for this? It would make a nice political thriller if it were properly written, but that doesn't make it true.
 
 
-6 # Kiwikid 2017-01-14 01:53
Yep, Eric - we're back in the twilight zone
 
 
+5 # Radscal 2017-01-14 17:05
Speaking of Twilight Zone, you never replied to my posting about the CIA coup of Australia in the 1970s. You good with that?
 
 
+11 # m... 2017-01-13 20:54
When are the 'TRUMPELTHINSKI N- President of Crazyland' T-Shirts going on sale..?
 
 
+16 # Vardoz 2017-01-13 21:02
Anything goes with this mob. Bill Clinton foiled an attempt on the WTO. I remember. They didn't have to have a 911 to go in Iraq. But they did create the Patriot Act which stripped us of our right to due process. I think the military could have hatched a less dramatic and less murderous event to get what they wanted. But they are a mafia and when they want to get something done they just do it. Anybody is considered collateral damage.
 
 
-9 # Kiwikid 2017-01-14 01:55
Seriously? How many of you are there that believe this nonsense? - It seems like an epidemic.
 
 
+8 # mdmcdmd 2017-01-13 21:45
Don't fall for Trump's gaslighting.

The degree of narcissism and ignorance about to take office is off the scale.

Suddenly the voices of Hayden, Graham, McCain, McConnell, etc.,are sounding relatively sane and reasonable. Wow.

What a mess.
 
 
+6 # Winston Smith II 2017-01-14 08:45
"Suddenly the voices of Hayden, Graham, McCain, McConnell, etc.,are sounding relatively sane and reasonable. Wow."


Not by a long shot. They are sounding more insane than ever. This one twitter from Trump says it all. The stupid people are Hayden, Graham, McCain and all the rest of the cold warriors --


Having a good relationship with Russia is a good thing, not a bad thing. Only "stupid" people, or fools, would think that it is bad! We.....
— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTru mp) January 7, 2017
 
 
+3 # wrknight 2017-01-14 12:59
Quoting mdmcdmd:
Don't fall for Trump's gaslighting.

The degree of narcissism and ignorance about to take office is off the scale.

Suddenly the voices of Hayden, Graham, McCain, McConnell, etc.,are sounding relatively sane and reasonable. Wow.

What a mess.

Actually, I was thinking the opposite.
 
 
+2 # anachronis 2017-01-13 21:54
Hayden’s article is an inept attempt of rendering comedy — funny only like a pratfall.

If the "intelligence" community needs to assert Trump does not intimidate it, then Trump intimidates it. Hence, this hugely prolix piece of disheveled splicing of faux fact and world class illogic — put with Rube Goldberg style. [Did Hayden ever have any sense of what he might do with all the illegally hacked private information he gathered with means like a giant obsolete vacuum cleaner run amuk.]

The truth is: The "intelligence" community (Hayden) cannot bear the fact that, for hugely good cause, a President Elect finds the community's (Hayden's) bare, but global, "Russia did it" blather undeserving of credit. [Daddy doesn't love us anymore.]

Ah, the delicious details, like these:

"Note the near sneering quotation marks around intelligence and the smothering of culpability for the hacks by prefacing Russian involvement with "so-called."

"Then...the (untrue) ploy that the meeting had been moved because intelligence officials weren't ready."

Hayden puts zero proof that Russia hacked what he want us to believe Russia hacked. The "intelligence" community lacks intelligence enough to craft a credible case of ANYTHING. "Untrue ploy"? The meeting MUST have been delayed because the "intelligence" community could not see how to recycle its proof-wanting claims as SOMETHING a non-brain-dead audience might believe. Surprise: the meeting yielded just more rehash of baseless claims.
 
 
+2 # anachronis 2017-01-13 23:40
*
A different point of view:

https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2017/01/13/guar-j13.html
 
 
+1 # anachronis 2017-01-13 23:45
*
Another instance of a different, and refreshing, point of view:

https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2017/01/13/cybe-j13.html
 
 
+5 # anachronis 2017-01-13 23:49
*
Still another refreshing, different point of view:

http://www.counterpunch.org/2017/01/13/did-the-russians-really-hack-the-dnc/
 
 
+6 # Wally Jasper 2017-01-14 10:29
This article in particular, through carefully detailing how emails are hacked, thoroughly debunks the notion that the US Intelligence community has any definitive evidence that Russia is behind the attacks.
 
 
-5 # Kiwikid 2017-01-14 01:58
Oh, come on! Even Trump and his team have now accepted that the Russians hacked the election process. Why is the obvious so difficult for so many of you to accept when it doesn't conform to your predetermined narrative?
 
 
0 # bardphile 2017-01-13 22:19
Hannity is not a Trump acolyte. Trump is a Hannity acolyte, more like. Remember those "interviews" before the election, with Sean leading the Donald around by the (figurative) ring in his nose? Hilarious, at least until the votes came in.
 
 
+7 # PaineRad 2017-01-13 22:55
Like you weren't intimidated by Darth Cheney into massaging, bending and twisting the intel so as to create WMDs in Iraq?
 
 
+11 # ronnewmexico 2017-01-13 23:19
I detest Trump and all he stands for but this…
""Our source is not the Russian government and it is not a state party” — was narrowly crafted, and hardly the categorical denial advertised in the tweet. Besides, Assange is a known liar, and how would he know the ultimate provenance of the emails, anyway?"

Seems a pretty firm catagorical denial to me. Perhaps this is why our intellligence community has had so many problems over the years, they cannot under stand the written or spoken word.

AS to who is telling the truth…where has Assange lied to us?
I know Clapper certainly has and recently.

Well at least he fell short of calling Assange a pedophile like CNN did. So there is that.
 
 
+3 # librarian1984 2017-01-14 13:19
"they cannot understand the written or spoken word"

I think they cannot BELIEVE the written or spoken word. Imagine what their world is like. Everything is a calculated maneuver. Nothing is true, only verifiable. Nothing is authentic, only desirable or not.

Further, they do not believe we should judge them by their past words and actions because they perceive this as a game, with winners and losers.

Also, because they never have to worry about funding or accountability, they have developed a hyperbolic sense of entitlement.

What keeps them from recognizing truth is their culture .. and their arrogance.
 
 
-1 # chemtex2611 2017-01-14 01:29
you all sound pretty naive about spying and hacking. There is little or nothing that Mr. T knows about either. The Russians are smarter than you might think -- they are the proverbial rat in the corner. Russia is plagued by falling energy prices, their military is run by hazing, and the population is falling due to the high rates of AIDS and TB and alcoholism. The only thing Putin has going for him is his old spook nature, just like Bobby Inman and Daddy Bush. He has body doubles of Mr.T and has a spy team following him and listening in and having his computers. I guess we'll just have to wait and see if Mr. T likes Mr. P well enough to get rid of sanctions.
 
 
+7 # ronnewmexico 2017-01-14 13:30
I should think then of Russians as this….."The Russians are smarter than you might think -- they are the proverbial rat in the corner. "

As rats.

No I won't think of them that way. And if China is the next to be demonized I will not think of them in that way as well.
 
 
+8 # MDSolomon 2017-01-14 13:12
Nice try, Michael Hayden, but not nearly clever enough.

You may want to pretend that the intelligence agencies represent some type of thoughtful council of analytic minds who serve the American people, but this has never been the case.

As is obvious from the time it was created by Allen Dulles, the CIA has been a tool of the Anglo-Euro-Amer ican banking cartel and its corporations, who not only aided Hitler, but hired many of his intelligence officers when the OSS morphed into the CIA and doubled in size.

So, we get that Trump, for all his misogyny and ego-maniacal behavior, is not under your control and that you need to invent stories to impeach him, or worse.

Luckily, more and more people are seeing through your pitiful charade and, let's be frank, treason, as your controllers include foreign nationals.

http://coloradopublicbanking.blogspot.com/2017/01/us-intelligence-reports-fail.html
 
 
+1 # rogerhgreen 2017-01-14 22:09
If I could, I would lock Trump, Hayden and Clapper in a small room and open the door when semi-liquid started running out under the door. Unfortunately I can't, not being able to get my hands on any of the three. Is what's going on good for the country? For that matter, would what I say I would do if I could be good for the country? I don't know. Is there anything anybody could do right now that would be good for the country? Sadly, it doesn't seem so.
 
 
0 # dquandle 2017-01-17 01:17
Translation: we ain't afraid of assassinatin' anybuddy
 

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