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Hartung writes: "Through good times and bad, regardless of what's actually happening in the world, one thing is certain: in the long run, the Pentagon budget won't go down."

Navy maintainers stand by a grounded F-35. (photo: U.S. Air Force)
Navy maintainers stand by a grounded F-35. (photo: U.S. Air Force)


The Urge to Splurge, Why Is It So Hard to Reduce the Pentagon Budget?

By William D. Hartung, TomDispatch

25 October 16

 


[Note for TomDispatch Readers: We’re proud to note that Nick Turse’s remarkable work for this website (and elsewhere) on the shadowy use of American Special Operations forces globally has been named Project Censored’s number one story of 2015-2016. Click here for Turse’s latest TD piece on the subject and expect more revelations in the months to come. Congratulations, Nick! Tom]

War, what is it good for?  In America, the answer is that, much of the time, you’ll probably never know what it's good for -- or, in some cases, even notice that we’re at war.  Right now, the U.S. is ever more deeply involved in significant conflicts in Iraq, Syria, Somalia, Libya, and increasingly Yemen -- at least five ongoing wars in the Greater Middle East.  Yet, in the midst of Election 2016, with the single exception of the long-proclaimed, long-awaited Iraqi-Kurdish offensive against Islamic State militants in the city of Mosul (with U.S. advisers on the frontlines and U.S. Apache helicopter crews in the air), the rest of our spreading military actions might as well be taking place on Mars.

The Taliban has recently attacked two Afghan cities and is gaining ground nationwide; Afghan military casualties have been soaring; and American planes and advisers have been let loose there in a fashion unseen since 2014.  Neither presidential candidate has offered a peep on the subject, nor has there been a question about that now-15-year-old war in any of the “debates.” (They must be rigged!)  In Syria, the U.S. air campaign continues, largely unnoticed, while Washington tries to broker a deal between the Turks and the Kurds (think Hatfields and McCoys) for an offensive to take ISIS’s “capital” Raqqa. (Good luck on that twosome working together!)

The New York Times recently described the expanding but under-the-radar American war against the al-Shabab terror movement in Somalia this way: “Hundreds of American troops now rotate through makeshift bases in Somalia, the largest military presence since the United States pulled out of the country after the ‘Black Hawk Down’ battle in 1993... It carries enormous risks -- including more American casualties, botched airstrikes that kill civilians and the potential for the United States to be drawn even more deeply into a troubled country that so far has stymied all efforts to fix it.”

As for Libya -- oh, yes, Washington is in action there, too, even if you never hear about it -- the U.S. Air Force (drones, jets, and helicopters) has doubled its air strikes against ISIS militants in the last month: 163 of them. And, of course, there’s Yemen where the U.S. seems to be stumbling directly into a new war without the slightest notice to Congress or the American people. American destroyers have been responding to “missile attacks” that -- shades of the Tonkin Gulf incident of the Vietnam War era -- may or may not have happened by firing Tomahawk cruise missiles at targets in territory occupied by the Houthi rebels. This in a country already under siege from a brutal American-backed Saudi air campaign, significantly aimed at its impoverished civilian population, and wracked by an expanding al-Qaeda operation. Even what those destroyers are doing so close to the Yemeni coast is never discussed.

Add it all up and one classic TomDispatch question comes to mind: What could possibly go wrong? Especially since, as TomDispatch regular William Hartung points out today, it’s all sunshine when it comes to one great war-fighting fact: the Pentagon’s budget is already coming up roses and no matter who enters the Oval Office, it’s only going to get bigger. So buckle up that seat belt, it’s war, American-style, and taxpayer dollars to the horizon.

-Tom Engelhardt, TomDispatch


The Urge to Splurge
Why Is It So Hard to Reduce the Pentagon Budget?

hrough good times and bad, regardless of what’s actually happening in the world, one thing is certain: in the long run, the Pentagon budget won’t go down.

It’s not that that budget has never been reduced. At pivotal moments, like the end of World War II as well as war's end in Korea and Vietnam, there were indeed temporary downturns, as there was after the Cold War ended. More recently, the Budget Control Act of 2011 threw a monkey wrench into the Pentagon’s plans for funding that would go ever onward and upward by putting a cap on the money Congress could pony up for it. The remarkable thing, though, is not that such moments have occurred, but how modest and short-lived they’ve proved to be.

Take the current budget. It’s down slightly from its peak in 2011, when it reached the highest level since World War II, but this year’s budget for the Pentagon and related agencies is nothing to sneeze at. It comes in at roughly $600 billion -- more than the peak year of the massive arms build-up initiated by President Ronald Reagan back in the 1980s. To put this figure in perspective: despite troop levels in Iraq and Afghanistan dropping sharply over the past eight years, the Obama administration has still managed to spend more on the Pentagon than the Bush administration did during its two terms in office.

What accounts for the Department of Defense’s ability to keep a stranglehold on your tax dollars year after endless year?

Pillar one supporting that edifice: ideology.  As long as most Americans accept the notion that it is the God-given mission and right of the United States to go anywhere on the planet and do more or less anything it cares to do with its military, you won’t see Pentagon spending brought under real control.  Think of this as the military corollary to American exceptionalism -- or just call it the doctrine of armed exceptionalism, if you will.

The second pillar supporting lavish military budgets (and this will hardly surprise you): the entrenched power of the arms lobby and its allies in the Pentagon and on Capitol Hill.  The strategic placement of arms production facilities and military bases in key states and Congressional districts has created an economic dependency that has saved many a flawed weapons system from being unceremoniously dumped in the trash bin of history.

Lockheed Martin, for instance, has put together a handy map of how its troubled F-35 fighter jet has created 125,000 jobs in 46 states. The actual figures are, in fact, considerably lower, but the principle holds: having subcontractors in dozens of states makes it harder for members of Congress to consider cutting or slowing down even a failed or failing program. Take as an example the M-1 tank, which the Army actually wanted to stop buying. Its plans were thwarted by the Ohio congressional delegation, which led a fight to add more M-1s to the budget in order to keep the General Dynamics production line in Lima, Ohio, up and running. In a similar fashion, prodded by the Missouri delegation, Congress added two different versions of Boeing’s F-18 aircraft to the budget to keep funds flowing to that company’s St. Louis area plant.

The one-two punch of an environment in which the military can do no wrong, while being outfitted for every global task imaginable, and what former Pentagon analyst Franklin “Chuck” Spinney has called “political engineering,” has been a tough combination to beat.

“Scare the Hell Out of the American People”

The overwhelming consensus in favor of a “cover the globe” military strategy has been broken from time to time by popular resistance to the idea of using war as a central tool of foreign policy.  In such periods, getting Americans behind a program of feeding the military machine massive sums of money has generally required a heavy dose of fear.

For example, the last thing most Americans wanted after the devastation and hardship unleashed by World War II was to immediately put the country back on a war footing. The demobilization of millions of soldiers and a sharp cutback in weapons spending in the immediate postwar years rocked what President Dwight Eisenhower would later dub the “military-industrial complex.”

As Wayne Biddle has noted in his seminal book Barons of the Sky, the U.S. aerospace industry produced an astonishing 300,000-plus military aircraft during World War II. Not surprisingly, major weapons producers struggled to survive in a peacetime environment in which government demand for their products threatened to be a tiny fraction of wartime levels.

Lockheed President Robert Gross was terrified by the potential impact of war’s end on his company’s business, as were many of his industry cohorts. “As long as I live," he said, "I will never forget those short, appalling weeks” of the immediate postwar period.  To be clear, Gross was appalled not by the war itself, but by the drop off in orders occasioned by its end. He elaborated in a 1947 letter to a friend: “We had one underlying element of comfort and reassurance during the war. We knew we’d get paid for anything we built.  Now we are almost entirely on our own.”

The postwar doldrums in military spending that worried him so were reversed only after the American public had been fed a steady, fear-filled diet of anti-communism.  NSC-68, a secret memorandum the National Security Council prepared for President Harry Truman in April 1950, created the template for a policy based on the global “containment” of communism and grounded in a plan to encircle the Soviet Union with U.S. military forces, bases, and alliances.  This would, of course, prove to be a strikingly expensive proposition. The concluding paragraphs of that memorandum underscored exactly that point, calling for a “sustained buildup of U.S. political, economic, and military strength... [to] frustrate the Kremlin design of a world dominated by its will.”

Senator Arthur Vandenberg put the thrust of this new Cold War policy in far simpler terms when he bluntly advised President Truman to “scare the hell out of the American people” to win support for a $400 million aid plan for Greece and Turkey.  His suggestion would be put into effect not just for those two countries but to generate support for what President Eisenhower would later describe as “a permanent arms establishment of vast proportions.”

Industry leaders like Lockheed’s Gross were poised to take advantage of such planning.  In a draft of a 1950 speech, he noted, giddily enough, that “for the first time in recorded history, one country has assumed global responsibility.” Meeting that responsibility would naturally mean using air transport to deliver “huge quantities of men, food, ammunition, tanks, gasoline, oil and thousands of other articles of war to a number of widely separated places on the face of the earth.”  Lockheed, of course, stood ready to heed the call.

The next major challenge to armed exceptionalism and to the further militarization of foreign policy came after the disastrous Vietnam War, which drove many Americans to question the wisdom of a policy of permanent global interventionism.  That phenomenon would be dubbed the “Vietnam syndrome” by interventionists, as if opposition to such a military policy were a disease, not a position.  Still, that “syndrome” carried considerable, if ever-decreasing, weight for a decade and a half, despite the Pentagon’s Reagan-inspired arms build-up of the 1980s.

With the 1991 Persian Gulf War, Washington decisively renewed its practice of responding to perceived foreign threats with large-scale military interventions.  That quick victory over Iraqi autocrat Saddam Hussein’s forces in Kuwait was celebrated by many hawks as the end of the Vietnam-induced malaise.  Amid victory parades and celebrations, President George H.W. Bush would enthusiastically exclaim: “And, by God, we've kicked the Vietnam syndrome once and for all.”

However, perhaps the biggest threat since World War II to an “arms establishment of vast proportions” came with the dissolution of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War, also in 1991.  How to mainline fear into the American public and justify Cold War levels of spending when that other superpower, the Soviet Union, the primary threat of the previous nearly half-a-century, had just evaporated and there was next to nothing threatening on the horizon?  General Colin Powell, then chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, summed up the fears of that moment within the military and the arms complex when he said, “I’m running out of demons. I’m running out of villains. I’m down to Castro and Kim Il-sung.”

In reality, he underestimated the Pentagon’s ability to conjure up new threats. Military spending did indeed drop at the end of the Cold War, but the Pentagon helped staunch the bleeding relatively quickly before a “peace dividend” could be delivered to the American people. Instead, it put a firm floor under the fall by announcing what came to be known as the "rogue state" doctrine. Resources formerly aimed at the Soviet Union would now be focused on “regional hegemons” like Iraq and North Korea.

Fear, Greed, and Hubris Win the Day

After the 9/11 attacks, the rogue state doctrine morphed into the Global War on Terror (GWOT), which neoconservative pundits soon labeled “World War IV.” The heightened fear campaign that went with it, in turn, helped sow the seeds for the 2003 invasion of Iraq, which was promoted by visions of mushroom clouds rising over American cities and a drumbeat of Bush administration claims (all false) that Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction and ties to al-Qaeda.  Some administration officials including Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld even suggested that Saddam was like Hitler, as if a modest-sized Middle Eastern state could somehow muster the resources to conquer the globe.

The administration’s propaganda campaign would be supplemented by the work of right-wing corporate-funded think tanks like the Heritage Foundation and the American Enterprise Institute.  And no one should be surprised to learn that the military-industrial complex and its money, its lobbyists, and its interests were in the middle of it all.  Take Lockheed Martin Vice President Bruce Jackson, for example.  In 1997, he became a director of the Project for the New American Century (PNAC) and so part of a gaggle of hawks including future Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul Wolfowitz, future Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, and future Vice President Dick Cheney. In those years, PNAC would advocate the overthrow of Saddam Hussein as part of its project to turn the planet into an American military protectorate. Many of its members would, of course, enter the Bush administration in crucial roles and become architects of the GWOT and the invasion of Iraq.

The Afghan and Iraq wars would prove an absolute bonanza for contractors as the Pentagon budget soared. Traditional weapons suppliers like Lockheed Martin and Boeing prospered, as did private contractors like Dick Cheney’s former employer, Halliburton, which made billions providing logistical support to U.S. troops in the field.  Other major beneficiaries included firms like Blackwater and DynCorp, whose employees guarded U.S. facilities and oil pipelines while training Afghan and Iraqi security forces. As much as $60 billion of the funds funneled to such contractors in Iraq and Afghanistan would be “wasted,” but not from the point of view of companies for which waste could generate as much profit as a job well done. So Halliburton and its cohorts weren’t complaining.

On entering the Oval Office, President Obama would ditch the term GWOT in favor of “countering violent extremism” -- and then essentially settle for a no-name global war.  He would shift gears from a strategy focused on large numbers of “boots on the ground” to an emphasis on drone strikes, the use of Special Operations forces, and massive transfers of arms to U.S. allies like Saudi Arabia.  In the context of an increasingly militarized foreign policy, one might call Obama’s approach “politically sustainable warfare,” since it involved fewer (American) casualties and lower costs than Bush-style warfare, which peaked in Iraq at more than 160,000 troops and a comparable number of private contractors.

Recent terror attacks against Western targets from Brussels, Paris, and Nice to San Bernardino and Orlando have offered the national security state and the Obama administration the necessary fear factor that makes the case for higher Pentagon spending so palatable. This has been true despite the fact that more tanks, bombers, aircraft carriers, and nuclear weapons will be useless in preventing such attacks.

The majority of what the Pentagon spends, of course, has nothing to do with fighting terrorism. But whatever it has or hasn’t been called, the war against terror has proven to be a cash cow for the Pentagon and contractors like Lockheed Martin, Boeing, Northrop Grumman, and Raytheon.

The “war budget” -- money meant for the Pentagon but not included in its regular budget -- has been used to add on tens of billions of dollars more. It has proven to be an effective “slush fund” for weapons and activities that have nothing to do with immediate war fighting and has been the Pentagon’s preferred method for evading the caps on its budget imposed by the Budget Control Act.  A Pentagon spokesman admitted as much recently by acknowledging that more than half of the $58.8 billion war budget is being used to pay for non-war costs.

The abuse of the war budget leaves ample room in the Pentagon’s main budget for items like the overpriced, underperforming F-35 combat aircraft, a plane which, at a price tag of $1.4 trillion over its lifetime, is on track to be the most expensive weapons program ever undertaken.  That slush fund is also enabling the Pentagon to spend billions of dollars in seed money as a down payment on the department’s proposed $1 trillion plan to buy a new generation of nuclear-armed bombers, missiles, and submarines.  Shutting it down could force the Pentagon to do what it likes least: live within an actual budget rather continuing to push its top line ever upward.

Although rarely discussed due to the focus on Donald Trump’s abominable behavior and racist rhetoric, both candidates for president are in favor of increasing Pentagon spending.  Trump’s “plan” (if one can call it that) hews closely to a blueprint developed by the Heritage Foundation that, if implemented, could increase Pentagon spending by a cumulative $900 billion over the next decade.  The size of a Clinton buildup is less clear, but she has also pledged to work toward lifting the caps on the Pentagon’s regular budget.  If that were done and the war fund continued to be stuffed with non-war-related items, one thing is certain: the Pentagon and its contractors will be sitting pretty.

As long as fear, greed, and hubris are the dominant factors driving Pentagon spending, no matter who is in the White House, substantial and enduring budget reductions are essentially inconceivable. A wasteful practice may be eliminated here or an unnecessary weapons system cut there, but more fundamental change would require taking on the fear factor, the doctrine of armed exceptionalism, and the way the military-industrial complex is embedded in Washington.

Only such a culture shift would allow for a clear-eyed assessment of what constitutes “defense” and how much money would be needed to provide it.  Unfortunately, the military-industrial complex that Eisenhower warned Americans about more than 50 years ago is alive and well, and gobbling up your tax dollars at an alarming rate.



William D. Hartung, a TomDispatch regular, is the director of the Arms and Security Project at the Center for International Policy. He is the author of Prophets of War: Lockheed Martin and the Making of the Military-Industrial Complex.

Follow TomDispatch on Twitter and join us on Facebook. Check out the newest Dispatch Book, Nick Turse’s Next Time They’ll Come to Count the Dead, and Tom Engelhardt's latest book, Shadow Government: Surveillance, Secret Wars, and a Global Security State in a Single-Superpower World.

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+12 # Brice 2016-10-25 15:05
Noam Chomsky has a great talk on the military and technology. His thesis is that the military and defense is the basis of our economy.

Basically, we all pay for the military, and the military develops all the cool technology that gets privatized and monopolized out to he right people so they stay in business, but never to the people. So, don't let anyone, even the generals tell you that we are not in at least some way a socialist nation.

And our wars are about testing it, refining it and keeping ahead of everyone else.

Not sure if Chomsky would like my description of his words, but that's what I got out of it.

--

To me this is the main reason why the Left/Progressiv es or anyone who wants change in this country ought to cooperate together on domestic policies, such as education, health care, social safety net. infrastructure, etc. Since the military and hence foreign policy is the basis of our economy and probably the majority of the 1% - threatening it in any way has always been and will continue to be a non-starter.
 
 
+12 # moreover 2016-10-26 00:23
Tom Hayden, the great activist who died Sunday, talked about this in a 2011 talk I recorded. He maintains that the incredibly bloated war budget eliminates any possibility for funding social or environmental programs favored by progressives. And recalls Bob Woodward's book "Obama's Wars" where he reports that Obama was shocked when he learned how much our military costs us.
Hayden suggests that unless we manage to reduce the Pentagon's voracious appetite we won't get anywhere.
 
 
+8 # janie1893 2016-10-26 01:31
Mr. Chomsky is correct. Without war, the US economy would be in the sewer, and Americans don't know how to live "poor" anymore. America's value system has, over the years, thrown out many decent values such as share the wealth, comfort is good enough, compassion and concern for one's fellow man. Those have been replaced by greed and I'm all right Jack.
 
 
+7 # futhark 2016-10-26 01:44
This is exactly what Wolf Blitzer was saying recently about the American involvement as arms suppliers in the Saudi war against Yemen. Doing the ethically right thing of cutting off the American subsidy of the Saudi military is simply not an option because it would cause the loss of too many American jobs. This justification for support of an odiously undemocratic regime is monstrous.

The same can be said for just about every other connection between the American military and the endless series of brushfire wars in which the American military is engaged either directly as combatant or indirectly as supplier and/or advisor.
 
 
+2 # Robbee 2016-10-26 09:23
Quoting janie1893:
Americans don't know how to live "poor" anymore

- speak for yourself!
 
 
+2 # jimmythelark 2016-10-26 04:29
The only way we as a nation will curb military spending and STOP our TERRORIST interventions all over the world is IF we bring back the DRAFT and require everyone (EVERYONE!!) to serve in the MILITARY !! That includes Obama's DAUGHTERS , Clinton's Daughter, Trumpt's monsters instead of requiring our SOLDIERS to do repeated TOURS of DUTY in a combat zone (sometimes 5 back to back ) We (the VA Hospitals) also have to provide PSYCHOLOGICAL Therapy for however long it takes to readjust to civilian life . In Vietnam our soldiers were required to do one tour - WHY multiple times NOW !! Why are we sending soldiers from the NATIONAL GUARD ( I don't think that is their function- they are OLD , have families - they get killed the U.S. has to provide for their families - the children's education. We're sending MOTHERS over to fight - don't we have any young men voluntering?? How about all of the FOREIGNERS who have come over to the U.S and made our COUNTRY their HOME !! Make them go over and FIGHT!! as a requirement to get into our SAFE country !! The west side of L.A. has turned into a haven for MIDDLE EASTERN young men who are FILTHY RICH !! Why do we send our young men over to their country to FIGHT THEIR WARS- sending our women and MOTHERS over to fight their WAR really sadens me !!!I left the U.S.A. in 2005 - I couldn't TAKE people in L.A. driving around with BANNERS similiar to Football Flags drapped from their car windows like it was a football game !! (continued)
 
 
+5 # tedrey 2016-10-26 10:54
Lets just stop the wars instead
 
 
-3 # jimmythelark 2016-10-26 04:44
Continued from Jimmythelark: I expressed my disdain for the Flags waving as if it was a UCLA vs USC football game !! My neighbor who was never in the military and was a rich "FOREIGNER"repl ied " They ( the soldiers get paid for DYING) What a comment from an ignorant, lazy ass foreigner ?? We as a PEOPLE have to take back our country - get RID of the Politicans - they have no clue as to what is going on!! Vote them out of office!! We need a "DEXTER" to deal with them!!
 
 
+1 # Robbee 2016-10-26 13:08
"sequestration" is a brilliant first step to reining in the military budget

it seems common sense that we should not spend more on military than everything else combined

for now i'm satisfied that hawks scream bloody murder and haven't a leg to stand on - basically hawks fear "sequestration" worse than death
 
 
+1 # John Puma 2016-10-26 13:31
Why? Because the society is essentially embalmed in a lurid militarism maintained by heroically sustained propaganda of hate and fear.
 
 
-3 # Robbee 2016-10-26 17:42
Quoting John Puma:
Why? Because the society is essentially embalmed in a lurid militarism maintained by heroically sustained propaganda of hate and fear.

- obama and hill offered putin a "reset" - real detente - but, likewise, russian "society is essentially embalmed in a lurid militarism maintained by heroically sustained propaganda of hate and fear"

as rump will learn - whether he becomes prez or not - putin is not on the side of the angels either - it takes two to cold war! - sorry
 
 
-3 # Robbee 2016-10-26 17:58
while rump was studying bedding as many gorgeous women as possible - putin was playing international political chess

if rump becomes prez he will "lose" every meaningful game to putin - putin will "eat his lunch" - the real danger comes when rump becomes embarrassed - in front of the american public - at always "losing" - what will he risk? to avoid being viewed by america as a "loser"?
 
 
+1 # John Puma 2016-10-27 01:43
Let me interrupt your conversation with yourself to note that HRC will win the election. Your Putin-hate nicely illustrates my point, thanks.

I'll finish with a brief summary of US foreign "policy":

1) Foreign rulers may not kill “their own people.” Killing “their” totally innocent people is the exclusive right of the USofA.

2) Foreign rulers may pursue only “the global interests” of the USofA. Pursuit of “their own interests” will result in penalties as outlined in “1),” above.
 
 
+1 # Aliazer 2016-10-26 17:32
These so called "Wars" are first of all "unconstitution al" aided, encouraged and abetted by a criminal representative government

Their support is highly dependent on disinformation and lies to befuddle the public but with the sole intent to implement an illegitimate agenda which has nothing to do of defending the country or defeating terrorism.

Their agenda, although hidden from the public, is becoming increasingly clear to many of us and that is the criminal triad 1. Military Industrial Complex,2.Globa lism and 3.Zionist Aspirations, all conspiring to drive the people of this country and the nation into perennial pauperdom and bankruptcy.
 

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