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Reich writes: "People ask me all the time why Bernie is generating more enthusiasm among young voters than any candidate in Democratic primaries since Robert F. Kennedy ran in 1968."

Robert Reich. (photo: Getty)
Robert Reich. (photo: Getty)


Why Bernie Is Generating Such an Enormous Amount of Enthusiasm From Young People

By Robert Reich, Robert Reich's Facebook Page

24 March 16

 

eople ask me all the time why Bernie is generating more enthusiasm among young voters than any candidate in Democratic primaries since Robert F. Kennedy ran in 1968. (These young enthusiast voters aren't only white males, by the way. Exit polls show Bernie winning a majority of young women, African-Americans, Latinos and Latinas.)

It’s not because of Bernie’s youth, charisma, charm, or good looks. It’s because young people understand that:

  1. Concentrated income and wealth at the top translates into political power to further rig the economic game to the advantage of the wealthy – compounding both their power and their wealth.

  2. This vicious cycle is growing worse, and will be irreversible unless a “political revolution” reclaims our democracy and economy.

  3. Such a political revolution is the prerequisite for everything else – reversing climate change, overcoming structural racism, rebuilding the middle class, achieving equal opportunity and upward mobility for the poor, and avoiding cataclysmic war.

  4. Young people have lots to gain from winning this political revolution and lots to lose from failing to do so because they'll bear the consequences their entire lives. This isn’t to say that middle-aged and older Americans care any less. It’s just that younger voters have an even greater stake.

What do you think?

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Comments   

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+123 # Capn Canard 2016-03-24 14:36
What do I think? Well Robert, since you asked... I think that someone should run under those same principles in every election, but I can only remember who did so with any consistency and that was Denis Kucinich, and he was lone person who did so. And that speaks volumes for how corrupt, criminal, fat and lazy the Democrats have become. You measure how the DNC has abandoned nearly all the FDR New Deal policies and even look like they are ready to dismantle social security. They've thrown us under the bus, vote them out.
 
 
+94 # Barracuda87 2016-03-24 23:31
In a disappointing and gutless move, the media undermined Kucinich by telling everyone that he believed in aliens and mocked his height. The difference this time around with Bernie, however, is that he has the people behind him. Whether he wins the primary or not, the revolution has begun and I can only hope the seeds he has planted are strong enough to take root for good!
 
 
-56 # ericlipps 2016-03-25 04:44
Quoting Barracuda87:
In a disappointing and gutless move, the media undermined Kucinich by telling everyone that he believed in aliens and mocked his height. The difference this time around with Bernie, however, is that he has the people behind him. Whether he wins the primary or not, the revolution has begun and I can only hope the seeds he has planted are strong enough to take root for good!

Not enough of the people, judging by primary results so far. Sanders tends to do best in small, rural, ultra-white states--and there aren't enough of them, or enough voters in them, to give him the victory in the Democratic primaries, let alone in November.
 
 
+67 # Juanbaltimore 2016-03-25 05:54
Don't wrote Bernie off too soon. Let's see what happens in the next couple of rounds of primaries. The "super delegates" will see which way the wind blows. Go Bernie, go.
 
 
+59 # Linda 2016-03-25 07:55
ericlipps,What a bunch of crap ! Have you ever seen the crowds Bernie draws at his rallies ,HRC isn't pulling in those crowds but someone is manipulating some of those voting machines and telling Bernie folks they can go home after the first vote at the every caucuses for her .Thankfully nobody went home this time and we won !Did you see the sizes of the crowds in Idaho and Utah ? Sanders does best in those caucus states where there are no machines to be manipulated ! Or in states the other candidate thought she had it all locked up like Michigan that came out big for Bernie. BTW black people came out in force for Bernie !Latinos,Latina s blacks and Native Americans are coming out for Bernie ! Why do you think that Bernie lost in AZ and Hillary won ? The Latinos ,Latinas and the Native American's were disenfranchised in Maricopa county . If HRC was the only one drawing their vote she would have lost big time but it was Bernie who lost instead !
In the south the fix was in ,the right people were paid off to swing that vote her way.When John Lewis would get up in front of the country and endorse Hillary and put down Bernie with a lie ,insinuating that Bernie never marched to Washington with MLK, you know just how corrupt and bought this system is !
Media as well as the DNC have manipulated this primary from day one to keep Bernie from winning so they can crown their neocon queen !
 
 
+33 # Saberoff 2016-03-25 08:58
Thank you, Linda!
 
 
+35 # newell 2016-03-25 08:33
Sanders is from a very white state (not his fault) and represents them--90% like his leadership. He has consistently stood up for all minorities--not just political lip service like the Clintons. It takes time for a new politician to become known--but as the months have gone by he has increased his minority support and the momentum is with him......... A new (the 24th) Bloomberg National poll has Sanders and Clinton now even.
 
 
+14 # hkatzman 2016-03-25 09:24
Quoting ericlipps:

Not enough of the people, judging by primary results so far. Sanders tends to do best in small, rural, ultra-white states--and there aren't enough of them, or enough voters in them, to give him the victory in the Democratic primaries, let alone in November.


Eric, stating it this way, like in the media, makes it look like this is a racist movement.

Instead, it could be considered an issue in communications. In small white states it is easier and more cohesive to get a personal message out. Here in New York, we NEVER see the candidates in person (they are too busy "speaking" to Wall Street).

I assume "Blacks" do not appear to be supporting Sanders (according to media reports) because they are not getting the message. Inequality is the key to everything, including racism. The only question is why it took a financial crisis for "Whites" to understand this also. As in every crisis issue, it first affects communities already in crisis. When it is ignored there, it WILL spread even to the "secure" suburbs. It seems that only at THAT point, does the rest of society suddenly wake up to crisis.

With an equitable society, then all groups have the opportunity to make their interests and ideas be heard.
 
 
+13 # laurele 2016-03-25 10:34
A lot of the primary and caucus results are suspect due to all the shenanigans that have gone on in state after state, from people waiting on lines until midnight in Arizona to Bill Clinton campaigning outside polling places in Massachusetts with a bullhorn to coin tosses in Iowa.
 
 
+38 # intheEPZ 2016-03-25 06:11
The seeds Paul Wellstone planted, and Kucinich watered, I hope you mean. Bernie, Dennis, and Paul Wellstone, speakers of truth to power. Can they rally enough voters behind the truth to overwhelm the political machinations, not to mention the flippable voting machine tallies, from both sides? Get on the phones!
 
 
+26 # Charles3000 2016-03-25 09:17
The revolution had begun before Bernie decided to run. It is just that it did not have a leader or spokesman. Bernie fulfilled those roles. He saw and understood the revolution that was there but unrecognized by many and took on the challenge of being the leader. Hurray for his insight and his dedication to the cause!
 
 
+8 # Ma Tsu 2016-03-25 19:24
Your point applies not only to the Democrats, but the whole of the political class - effectively speaking, the Republicrats.
An axiom from biology: Every organism has been as exploitative of its environment as its abilities allowed. The generation that won WWII tried to use it all up without knowing what "it" constituted, as did virtually all generations before them. The succeeding generation, the Baby Boomers, are trying to use it all up knowing full well what "it" constitutes. Why, we're lucky the Millennials don't rise up in the night and slit our throats as we sleep! Better (for us boomers, anyway,) that so many who support Bernie recognize their stake in the matter and are willing to sacrifice their personal good for a greater, common good, a world of peace, social justice and personal liberty. To put it another way, these young people are intent on restricting not only their own, but societies' exploitative tendencies, thus cultivating their higher natures and offering themselves and humanity at large a better shot at a civilized future. Bernie may be the vehicle, but the youth are the drivers. Hallelujah!
 
 
+6 # tigerlillie 2016-03-26 17:38
I have a 17 year old daughter. Without Sanders in office she and the rest of her generation have no future. It is that simple. The kids support Sanders because he is their future.
 
 
+119 # Ken Halt 2016-03-24 15:29
One can't help but notice with contempt how HRC's good buddy and DNC chair, Debbie Schultz, is fighting legislation supported by Elizabeth Warren that would regulate predatory lending. In her capacity as DNC chair Ms. Schultz has been doing everything she can to support HRC's candidacy, thus the DNC chair's actions couldn't come at a better time to underscore the difference between the two Dem candidates. The writing is on the wall: if HRC is elected it will be the sameosameo, with perhaps a few new countries to bomb. Thank you, Debbie, for making the choice so clear! And sincere gratitude to you, Mr. Reich, your endorsement of Bernie, after serving in Bill's cabinet and being a long-time friend of both Clintons, is a principled stand and political statement that I'm sure you did not take lightly or with pleasure.

PS: Ms. Schultz has a challenger this cycle for her congressional seat. I don't think I need to spell it out for you folks...
 
 
+55 # jimallyn 2016-03-25 00:08
Quoting Ken Halt:
PS: Ms. Schultz has a challenger this cycle for her congressional seat. I don't think I need to spell it out for you folks...

OK then, I will spell it out. Tim Canova is running against Debbie Wasserman Schultz. Visit his website to contribute to his campaign:

https://timcanova.com/

I've already contributed to his campaign a couple of times, and I intend to continue to contribute to his campaign every month when I get paid.
 
 
+15 # economagic 2016-03-25 06:19
Thanks -- for some reason my computer had not captured that address previously. Today any political office at the state level or above may become a national race. Put THAT in your originalist pipe and smoke it!
 
 
+4 # Jim Young 2016-03-26 11:05
Quoting jimallyn:
Quoting Ken Halt:
PS: Ms. Schultz has a challenger this cycle for her congressional seat. I don't think I need to spell it out for you folks...

OK then, I will spell it out. Tim Canova is running against Debbie Wasserman Schultz. Visit his website to contribute to his campaign:

https://timcanova.com/

I've already contributed to his campaign a couple of times, and I intend to continue to contribute to his campaign every month when I get paid.


Thanks for the reference, I'll see that my Florida relatives see this too.

P.S. Regarding the younger voters line, I'll be chronologically 70 when I vote for Bernie (or follow his lead). He has consistently stood for everything these old former Republicans (when they were like the Washburns of Maine) agreed with, and was a natural fit for those that have always wanted to get us back towards where we should have been by this time in our history. He's one of the best of us, and we have his back as much as he has ours.
 
 
+65 # MathGuy 2016-03-24 21:35
Middle-aged parents and senior grandparents should be voting for their children's FUTURE, but they are not and that is sad.
 
 
+30 # Linda 2016-03-25 08:18
MathGuy ,Not all seniors, this senior and others I know already voted for Bernie in MA. The problem here was no media coverage for Bernie. I handed out leaflets to people that had never even heard of Bernie thanks to media !
 
 
+20 # laurele 2016-03-25 10:39
You don't have to be a parent to care about the future of this country and this planet. The notion that it's just young people supporting Bernie is another media lie. Yes, he is getting strong support from young people, but he also has broad support across all generations.
 
 
0 # Depressionborn 2016-03-26 06:59
Quoting MathGuy:
Middle-aged parents and senior grandparents should be voting for their children's FUTURE, but they are not and that is sad.


we will. the great grandkids (6) will need a better world I think. We once had some good leaders. they were buried.
What we have now, surprising to most political analysts, is a genuine voter revolt against the rich and the establishment. Trump is taking over the Republican Party, and Sanders is threatening Clinton beyond what almost anyone would have forecast a year ago, even if he can’t quite seem to win.

And it doesn’t matter if Trump can back up most of his statements with facts, or if Sanders’ policies have any chance of being viable economically.

[we] "They understand what the pundits don’t. The people are angry and they want change."

God is greater than man
Women are different than men
gov is not to be trusted
 
 
0 # Depressionborn 2016-03-29 09:45
we still believe the lie?

"After the disgraceful conduct of the Republican establishment over the past few weeks, it is clear that Ted Cruz has become a pawn in their scheme to hold on to power.

The feckless manner in which Willard Romney first endorsed Marco Rubio, then John Kasich and finally Ted Cruz shows that he and his co-conspirators have no core principles except gaining and holding onto power."
 
 
+75 # macserp44 2016-03-24 22:12
The mainstream media is steering this election.
Shame on us for allowing them.
The New York Times is at the forefront of the movement to stop Bernie's campaign dead in it's tracks.....shou ld we be surprised that Wall Street's other rag is stacking the deck?
 
 
+93 # Thomas Martin 2016-03-24 22:13
If I'd had children I'd probably be a grandparent by now, but I'm voting for Bernie, and I'm voting for the futures of everyone! Let's bring back honesty and enlightenment into our government!
 
 
+74 # seakat 2016-03-24 22:37
Thank you Thomas, I was thinking along similar lines myself. I have a few years left in me & I'd like to live with that honesty & enlightenment for the remainder of my years.
 
 
+62 # jeffcox 2016-03-24 22:47
In addition to the cogent comments posted here, I also think these young people hear the honesty and integrity of Sanders in stark contrast to the pandering of HRC and the insanity of the GOP's stable of nitwits.
 
 
-8 # economagic 2016-03-25 06:23
As the verbal skills of many millennials seem to lag behind those of some earlier generations, their capacity for understanding non-verbal cues may have increased.
 
 
+75 # peterjmck1 2016-03-24 22:48
In a general sense, Robert Reich is correct. But it was a shot in the arm and an eye opener to actually go to a Bernie Rally at the Convention Centre in San Diego this past Tuesday night and see the tangible, concrete bases and reasons for his appeal., especially to younger voters.
At 68, I and my aging generation were - sadly - in a definite minority. More strange yet was to see very few other age groups between 18 and 60 in that mass of humanity as we waited to get in. I thought I was at some kind of party - a rave - that we had erroneously stumbled into.
But why was this diverse group of youngsters here rather than - to risk stereotyping them - getting stoned or skateboarding? What is the appeal of this socialist - an aging activist, a city lad from Brooklyn turned Vermonter? Once inside, you quickly got an idea. In terms of energy, there were 3 issues that got them going. The first - and loudest roar - was for legalization of pot. The puritan in me recoiled, but fuck that - lets have more "FDA approved" drugs to put the cartels out of business. Issue # 2 was tuition free state colleges - again, understandable. But it was the third that was truly moving. As Bernie talked from his Jewish immigrant roots, that overused word "authenticity" roared into reality as scores of Latinos around me yelled and clapped.
An unlikely grouping of issues, but what a tonic and a joy it was to be amid those roars of approval. And I began to remember what "hope" looked like again...!
 
 
+53 # Barracuda87 2016-03-24 23:23
I was at the rally too! I waited for 3 hours in a line that was about 2 miles long with people from all walks of life. I ended up in the overflow room with about 3,000 other people and resigned my self to the fact that I would have to watch the speech on the projector they had in there. About 5 mins after his speech, however, he came through the door to speak to all of us that had not been able to get into the main room and talked to us for about 15 minutes. You are correct that going and seeing Bernie speak in person really does give you hope. Obama "sold" us the idea of hope in 2008... but Bernie is the real deal!
 
 
+3 # Jim Young 2016-03-26 11:18
There seemed a more comprehensive age mix at the L.A. event (28,000 of us there), but I did enjoy the crowd in the overflow room, too. One asked why I had to go to more than one Bernie event, since he always said the same things.

It wasn't to see how consistent he has been, but to see all the new people hearing it for the first time.

I was amused, like all the crowd around me, by the one guy wearing a Trump for President shirt, trying to sell others. The first time he rushed by, outnumbered 10,000 to 1, he mumbled, "...never predicted this" as the crowd made room for him to pass without confrontation. Perhaps he will see the light and find out who is likely to do the most to end the worst of Wall St debt based speculation so far beyond what the rest of the world practices.
 
 
+61 # Jayceecool 2016-03-24 23:04
When you think about all the obstacles, reactionary Republcans, corrupted Demcrats, intransigent one-percenters, and everyone else who benefits from our rigged economy, you might think that profound change is impossible. Every revolution appears that way at first. Then the natural momentum generated by the deep dissatisfaction of the majority takes hold. That could be happening now...
 
 
+22 # Old Uncle Dave 2016-03-24 23:25
In 1968 it was Eugene McCarthy who first generated the enthusiasm among young people. RFK was backing LBJ until after he saw how well McCarthy did in New Hampshire.
 
 
+54 # RoseM 2016-03-25 00:54
Never too old. 74 and behind Bernie all the way. Go Bernie go!
 
 
+41 # GDW 2016-03-25 03:46
I think many of the young,that are paying attention, see a bleak future with the odds stacked against them. Bernie stands for change, a new world, a chance with an even playing ground. Hillary represents the establishment, but with a little more compassion for women's rights and other issues then the Republicans
I was born in 1950 and under the New Deal and the Great Society life in the 50's 60's and into the 70's was almost like living in paradise compared to today. The difference has been we now live under Reaganomics.
Used to be if you struggled hard you succeeded. Today we struggle just to survive.
 
 
+28 # tapelt 2016-03-25 04:48
Quoting GDW:
Used to be if you struggled hard you succeeded. Today we struggle just to survive.


Great line! That is the problem in a nutshell.
 
 
+19 # Linda 2016-03-25 08:57
GDW,
You're absolutely right ! I was born in 44 and I saw my mom go from working long hours from sun up to sunset in a spinning mill for peanuts, to the passing of labor laws where she worked 40 hours a week earning enough money to move us into decent housing where she could afford to buy our clothes instead of make them and buy Christmas presents instead of fruit and candy in our stockings !
Those were the good old days of equal opportunity that no longer exists today !
 
 
+26 # tapelt 2016-03-25 04:46
What you say makes tons of sense, but I am still baffled about why Bernie has done so badly with black voters in general. I just don't get it. He marched with MLK and lead sit in protests in universities and even got arrested for it when Hillary was supporting a segregationist. He has ALWAYS been champion of the poor and disenfranchised , not just some times but not other times. And yet, failure to get the black vote has been his biggest problem, and his single greatest threat to getting the nomination.


PLEASE write an article explaining what the heck happened here, and what Bernie can do about it.
 
 
+11 # Linda 2016-03-25 09:12
A few things came into play in the south where Hillary won big . 1. Bill Clinton is from the south the older generation knew him ,they did not know Bernie and the media blackout made sure they didn't 2. So when John Lewis the head of the Black Caucus publicly endorsed Hillary and insinuated that ,"Bernie never marched with MLK because he never saw him there," many of them believed him and voted for Hillary 3. and this which a lot of people don't know yet, Hillary supporters were infiltrating Bernie's campaign and sending Bernie's supporters on wild goose chases and canceling rallies .
In the north and east where more of the black community were aware of Bernie they came out and voted for him ,like in Michigan and MA !
 
 
+21 # walt 2016-03-25 06:33
I'm not a young person, but concern for the young people like my children is a great concern and driving my political views. Unless we change course now and vote Bernie Sanders in, the future will be bleak. Bernie is the real change we need. It's sad to see the Democratic party trying to squelch him secretly while promoting corporate Democrat Hillary Clinton who has shown her total dishonesty for decades. The DNC will pay for their indiscretion as the GOP is now since they took on the Tea Party. If they are wise, they will oust their current leadership and get behind Bernie.
Let's have real change. Let's vote for Bernie Sanders.
 
 
+12 # GDW 2016-03-25 06:51
It is in our own interest to have a as many well educated and informed young people as possible. They have closed off higher education to the working class. The elites will rule. And how well will they compete in world affairs?
 
 
+20 # crowtower 2016-03-25 07:02
Why are so many youth so energized? Because now the stakes are higher. Not only do they not want to inherit a road to hell (be buried in negative karma) for immoral wars, injustice, etc., but now there is the growing realization that we have poisoned and degraded the environment so much that we face a near term existential threat from it and climate aberration. They are literally fighting not only for their lives, but for all of Earthly creation.
 
 
+22 # Blackjack 2016-03-25 07:29
I attended a rally, too, in SC of all places, and it was the most joyfully spontaneous and invigorating political event I have ever attended. Why is Bernie doing so well with young people; I can't say for sure because I'm not young, but I FELT young in his and their presence and his message makes me more hopeful than any I've heard since RFK. This old Dem recognized decades ago that the Dem Party is almost as corrupt as the Repuke Party and that they have no problem selling young people and old people down the river so they can keep paying homage to their masters--the one percenters whose eternal money keeps them doing the will of those who brought them to the dance. Bernie is believable, passionate, wise, and courageous. Why wouldn't young people (and old) support him?
 
 
+13 # LarrySherk 2016-03-25 07:50
Robert Reich states the case perfectly. Thank God for our young people, smart as they are without even being given a decent education.

My generation has made a colossal mess and if our kids can figure it out they'll save the world.

There is still a little time.
 
 
+20 # tweddall 2016-03-25 07:58
This 83 year old Recovering Republican is both excited and frustrated for Bernie's chances. Excited because he is so refreshing and consistent and honest. Frustrated because the DNC machine, especially fellow Jewish MOC Schultz, is supporting the squirrelly Clinton mantra.
And as a native of Toronto it's hard for me to understand why thinking Americans don't accept the fact that the Canadians have successfully enjoyed single payer universal health care for over 40 years at half the cost and equal or better results. But we here still allow the Health Care cartels of insurance and BIG Pharma to put their profits ahead of our basic human right to health care.

As an engineer scared to death literally about the climate disruption we are growing I'd vote for Bernie on either count...and on getting to taxpayer paid for elections'! Go Bernie go...and here in "Friends of Coal" WV, I'll do whatever I can to get you into the White House!
 
 
+11 # Sweet Pea 2016-03-25 09:13
Quoting Linda:
MathGuy ,Not all seniors, this senior and others I know already voted for Bernie in MA. The problem here was no media coverage for Bernie. I handed out leaflets to people that had never even heard of Bernie thanks to media !

Thank heavens that Michigan has sense enough to vote Bernie as the nominee. We know that we are being destroyed by the free-trade agreements. Bernie has also realized it and is promising to work to turn it back so that we can again have industry in this country.
 
 
+9 # elly105 2016-03-25 09:43
I'm another idealistic and jaded 'Boomer for Benie'. I'm still hoping we can pull it off in spite of the media practically stonewalling him on major networks. I can't figure out how or why Hillary is capturing the African American majority. These people and my own older age group have everything to gain from a Bernie administration. BTW I am happy to hear that legalization of pot is in his agenda.
 
 
+7 # mh1224jst 2016-03-25 10:06
It's a good summary. All of this is apparent to them already, because of their low job prospects, low incomes, high education debt, and relatively high taxes. They know the wealthy have screwed them over -- even though most do not yet know how bad the horror story truly is.

The older white males supporting Trump also feel screwed over by the GOP establishment, which has pandered to their bigotry, fear and hatred. Now they are saying: "Hey! You lied to us!"

The GOP establishiment never had any intentions beyond making the rich richer. Even die-hard David Brooks has looked at the collapse of the GOP "establishment" and conceded that he has to rethink his economic views. Good luck with that, David!

As econophobic as we all are at heart, ALL of our issues are fundamentally economic, so we must learn to enjoy thinking about these things!
 
 
+6 # Robbee 2016-03-25 10:28
Why Bernie Is Generating Such an Enormous Amount of Enthusiasm From Young People

- i trace this all back to occupy - gatherings of millions of unemployed youth who educated each other about us 99% versus 1% economics!

occupy is dead! - long live occupy!
 
 
+6 # Robbee 2016-03-25 10:35
well put! - # RMDC 2015-11-07 09:28 "... Occupy ... did all that was possible to do for a de-centralized and truly populist movement. Millions more people are now educated about the power of money and banks than before.

"The US is moving into a populist phase ...

"Occupy was and is a real grass roots movement. The (challenge) is to turn that into a practical political movement with a political party and candidates who win elections. that is the next phase."

- the fibre of occupy were young, unemployed workers (youth of the 99%) - as so-slowly they hired into the great recession, the movement dissipated - it was not vanquished but lives on in populist campaigns for living wage, student debt relief, family leave, unions, equal pay, glass-steagal, busting up big banks, 99%, social security, medicaid, civil rights, voting rights, to name a few, so many ways!

bernie's wisdom is to build a grass roots movement out of these youth and others constantly oppressed to wage slavery by our ruling 1%, or, as he calls them, our "billionaire class" - go bernie!
 
 
+5 # ahollman 2016-03-25 11:59
I am a Sanders supporter, not just with talk, but with money.

I think it's great that "young people" (a statement rather empty of meaning, since it's not defined by a specific age range) are for Sen. Sanders (I'll leave it to trashy tabloids to refer to public figures by their first names).

However:

Segmenting the voting population into subgroups, by age, race, gender, income, or any other category, is a divide-and-conq uer tactic. It allows whoever is polling to selectively cherry-pick statistics; one can -always- find a subgroup that favors one's preferred candidate. Worse, it facilitates candidates pandering to what voters want to hear; if polling shows that group X doesn't like you that much, change your message to improve your appeal with them. What matters is not how a subgroup votes, but how -everyone- votes.

I believe Senator Sanders knows this. That's why, over decades, he hasn't changed his message very much. What you see is what you get.

As for "young people", they don't vote as often as older people, they more often get shallow news from infotainment shows instead of reading journalists, and they tend to spend more time tweeting on major issues than discussing them face to face. Twittering reaches far more people, but it too is shallow. You can't say much in a tweet, and it doesn't change people's minds much; social media is pervasive, but not persuasive.

So, go Sanders, go young people, but remember, it takes a whole country to elect a President.
 
 
+11 # Sweet Pea 2016-03-25 13:18
The young people are very concerned about their future. They have listened to parents and grandparents who were born "when" people had employment with good wages and benefits. Many of these young people have graduated from college only to find that we no longer have industry in this country. Our trade deals destroyed our industry.
 
 
0 # Depressionborn 2016-03-27 07:29
yes, Sweet Pea ,

Things are much changed now. She and I grew up with out government interference and everyone had to work. (I started at $.25 an hour 8 hours a day when I was 13). There was welfare only for widows and orphans, and bankers forbidden to speculates. Crime required intent and we all helped each other. We tried to stay out of war and to put America first. It didn't work. I think the destructor was war and greed nd fear. We had God then.
 
 
+2 # diamondmarge7 2016-03-27 10:50
Dear Professor/Dr. Reich,
I very much appreciate your political insights. Thank you for standing w/BERNERS like me: A lifelong FDR Democrat, an educated & enlightened woman who-like you-once supported the Clintons--but now, I fight like hell for this country. My motivation to volunteer, donate& phonebank for BERNIE is I see his basic decency; his lifelong passion for justice; his truthtelling-AN D I LOVE IT. This happily enfranchised liberal is doing all she can-despite living under greed-driven Republican idiotic state oppression, to see to it that BERNIE has A VERY GOOD WEEKEND come January 2017.
 

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