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Taibbi writes: "Holder will reassume his lucrative partnership (he made $2.5 million the last year he worked there) and take his seat in an office that reportedly - this is no joke - was kept empty for him in his absence."

Eric Holder is back at Covington & Burling after serving as U.S. attorney general for six years. (photo: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty)
Eric Holder is back at Covington & Burling after serving as U.S. attorney general for six years. (photo: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty)


Eric Holder, Wall Street Double Agent, Comes in From the Cold

By Matt Taibbi, Rolling Stone

10 July 15

 

ric Holder has gone back to work for his old firm, the white-collar defense heavyweight Covington & Burling. The former attorney general decided against going for a judgeship, saying he's not ready for the ivory tower yet. "I want to be a player," he told the National Law Journal, one would have to say ominously.

Holder will reassume his lucrative partnership (he made $2.5 million the last year he worked there) and take his seat in an office that reportedly – this is no joke – was kept empty for him in his absence.

The office thing might have been improper, but at this point, who cares? More at issue is the extraordinary run Holder just completed as one of history's great double agents. For six years, while brilliantly disguised as the attorney general of the United States, he was actually working deep undercover, DiCaprio in The Departed-style, as the best defense lawyer Wall Street ever had.

Holder denied there was anything weird about returning to one of Wall Street's favorite defense firms after six years of letting one banker after another skate on monstrous cases of fraud, tax evasion, market manipulation, money laundering, bribery and other offenses.

"Just because I'm at Covington doesn't mean I will abandon the public interest work," he told CNN. He added to the National Law Review that a big part of the reason he was going back to private practice was because he wanted to give back to the community.

"The firm's emphasis on pro bono work and being engaged in the civic life of this country is consistent with my worldview that lawyers need to be socially active," he said.

Right. He's going back to Covington & Burling because of the firm's emphasis on pro bono work.

Here's a man who just spent six years handing out soft-touch settlements to practically every Too Big to Fail bank in the world. Now he returns to a firm that represents many of those same companies: Morgan Stanley, Wells Fargo, Chase, Bank of America and Citigroup, to name a few.

Collectively, the decisions he made while in office saved those firms a sum that is impossible to calculate with exactitude. But even going by the massive rises in share price observed after he handed out these deals, his service was certainly worth many billions of dollars to Wall Street.

Now he will presumably collect assloads of money from those very same bankers. It's one of the biggest quid pro quo deals in the history of government service. Congressman Billy Tauzin once took a $2 million-a-year job lobbying for the pharmaceutical industry just a few weeks after helping to pass the revolting Prescription Drug Benefit Bill, but what Holder just did makes Tauzin look like a guy who once took a couple of Redskins tickets.

In this light, telling reporters that you're going back to Covington & Burling to be "engaged in the civic life of this country" seems like a joke for us all to suck on, like announcing that he's going back to get a doctorate at the University of Blow Me.

Holder doesn't look it, but he was a revolutionary. He institutionalized a radical dualistic approach to criminal justice, essentially creating a system of indulgences wherein the world's richest companies paid cash for their sins and escaped the sterner punishments the law dictated.

Here are five pillars of the Holder revolution:

One is that he failed to win a single conviction in court for any crimes related to the financial crisis. The only trial of any consequence brought by his Justice Department for crimes related to the crisis involved a pair of Bear Stearns nimrods named Ralph Cioffi and Matthew Tannin, who confided in each other via email that the subprime markets were "toast" but told their clients something very different to keep them invested.

After a jury acquitted both in early 2009, the Holder Justice Department turtled. Sources inside the DOJ told me over the years that both Holder and his deputy, fellow Covington & Burling alum Lanny Breuer, were obsessed with winning and refused to chance any case where they felt a jury might go sideways on them. Thus the Cioffi-Tannin case was the last financial crisis case they dared to bring into to a criminal courtroom – virtually every other case ended in settlements.

Two: Holder famously invented a concept called "collateral consequences," under which the state could pursue non-criminal alternatives for companies if they believed prosecuting them might result in too much "collateral" damage. Britain's HSBC bank, which admitted to massive money laundering violations, and the Swiss bank UBS, which was caught manipulating the Libor interest rate benchmark, were examples of firms that escaped vigorous prosecution because Holder and his lackeys were, ostensibly anyway, concerned about market-altering consequences.

Significantly, both banks were later caught up in even more serious scandals, leading to criticism that stiffer punishments the first time around might have prevented future damage. Holder's successor Loretta Lynch was even forced to rip up Holder's UBS deal for being insufficiently punitive. It's worth noting that Holder, before he became attorney general, represented UBS at Covington & Burling.

Holder's lenient policies were deployed at a time when fellow officials like Tim Geithner and Ben Bernanke were using bailout monies to merge troubled firms together and create even larger mega-companies. Chase and Wells Fargo, which swallowed up Washington Mutual and Wachovia in state-aided takeovers, were prototypes of the modern mega-bank. So when Holder wedded "collateral consequences" to these new Too Big to Fail mega-firms, he created Too Big to Jail. This is a huge part of his legacy, the creation of an unjailable class.

Three: Holder also pioneered the extrajudicial settlement, striking huge deals with companies in which judges did not sign off on the agreements. The arrangement prevented pesky judges like the irksome Jed Rakoff (who voided a pair of settlements he felt were inadequate) from protesting lenient justice.

This essentially institutionalized the backroom deal. Everything was done in secret, and there was no longer any opportunity for judges or anyone else to check the power of the executive branch to hand out financial indulgences.

The watchdog group Better Markets described the $13 billion Chase settlement, one of the biggest extrajudicial deals, as "an unprecedented settlement amount [that] cannot…immunize the DOJ from having to obtain independent judicial review of its otherwise unilateral, secret actions."

Four: There is a huge misconception, pushed equally by odd bedfellows in the financial community and Obama supporters, that Eric Holder didn't send anyone from Wall Street to jail because "no one broke any laws."

This preposterous meme grew out of something Barack Obama said on 60 Minutes. Here are the president's exact words:

"Some of the most damaging behavior on Wall Street — in some cases some of the least ethical behavior on Wall Street — wasn't illegal."

Obama, a brilliant lawyer and wordsmith, was not saying that all of the behavior leading to the crash was legal. He merely said that some of the worst behavior wasn't illegal. Which is true. Meaningless, but true.

Of course, some of the worst behavior was very illegal. This is confirmed in the fact that Holder extracted billions of dollars in settlement monies and even, in a few cases, obtained guilty pleas for crimes like fraud, manipulation, bribery, money laundering and tax evasion.

Anyone who even tries to claim that none of the banks actually did anything illegal should be directed to the HSBC settlement of December 2012. In this deferred prosecution agreement, Europe's largest bank paid $1.92 billion to settle their responsibility for violations of the Bank Secrecy Act and other laws.

This is from a description of HSBC's crimes by Holder's Justice Department:

"As a result of HSBC Bank USA's AML failures, at least $881 million in drug trafficking proceeds – including proceeds of drug trafficking by the Sinaloa Cartel in Mexico…were laundered through HSBC Bank USA."

You might remember the Sinaloa cartel for their ISIS-style, unforgettably upsetting torture videos. HSBC washed their cash. They even created special teller windows to make their deposits easier. This is admitted, not alleged.

But Holder went out of his way to let them keep their U.S. charter. He gave their executives a grand total of zero days in jail, zero dollars in individual fines.

To reiterate: HSBC laundered money for guys who chop peoples' heads off with chainsaws. So we can dispense with the "but no one broke any laws" thing.

When asked about this in testimony before the Senate, Holder told elected officials he was concerned harsher penalties against firms like HSBC would "have a negative impact on the national economy," and that this "has an inhibiting influence…on our ability to bring resolutions that I think would be more appropriate."

Compare this to what he just said after returning to Covington & Burling:

"I think that what we did in the department was, I always like to say, appropriately aggressive. There may be clients that, for whatever reason, will not decide to work with me..."

Oddly enough, Holder used that same phrase – "appropriately aggressive" – in his Senate testimony. In other words, the attorney general said he was "inhibited" from giving "appropriate" punishments just a few moments before claiming his punishments were appropriate. This is classic Clintonian politics, saying two things at the same time, neither of them true.

Five: Holder contributed countless subtle inventions to soften punishments. The most revolting in my view was allowing banks like Chase the courtesy of calling their settlements "remedial payments" instead of fines for wrongdoing.

This seemingly insignificant semantic tweak allowed the bank to call $7 billion of their settlement a business expense, which meant they could claim it as a tax deduction, which in turn meant that taxpayers like you and me paid a whopping $2.45 billion of Chase's penalty.

Some of the write-ups of these decisions emanating from the financial and legal press were hilarious. Law360.com, noting that the settlement language meant that 35 percent of the bank's regulatory burden would be shifted "onto the backs of taxpayers," pointed out, as if surprised, that the tax treatment "sparked debate" and that "some are even angry about it." Shocking!

Of course, none of us mortals can deduct so much as a speeding ticket, since we wouldn't want to use the tax code to encourage speeding. So why was it OK for the nation's top cop to make fraud or money laundering a tax-subsidized activity?

There were other tricks. Banks that committed multiple violations of the same offense were often allowed to settle or plead to just one count. And in many cases the fines were staggeringly low compared to the volume of crime – BNP-Paribas, for instance, paid $8.9 billion after laundering $30 billion, meaning they paid about 27 cents per dollar of violations.

Holder is a cynic of a type that's increasingly common in Washington. To follow his Justice Department was like watching an endless reel of The Good Wife – smart lawyers half-cleverly constructing one unseemly moral compromise after another, always justifying it to themselves in the end somehow in the name of keeping the ball rolling.

Holder doubtless seriously believed at first that in a time of financial crisis, he was doing the right thing in constructing new forms of justice for banks, where nobody but the shareholders actually had to pay for crime. You've heard of victimless crimes; Holder created the victimless punishment.

But in the end, it was pretty convenient, wasn't it, that "the right thing" also happened to be the strategy that preserved Democratic Party relationships with big-dollar donors, kept the client base at Holder's old firm nice and fat, made the influential rich immeasurably richer and allowed Eric Holder himself to crash-land into a giant pile of money upon resignation.

What a coincidence! In any civilized country, it'd be a scandal. In America, though, he's just another guy selling whatever he can to get by. It was just too bad that what Holder had to sell was the criminal justice system.

Below, watch Matt Taibbi discuss Holder on Wednesday's episode of Democracy Now!

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+35 # Blackjack 2015-07-10 09:59
Holder is a corporate shill and has always been. That became obvious the first six months of his holding office as AG. Had he done his job from the git-go, then we might not have had the Fergusons and other racist killings. He was not interested in justice; he was interested in keeping the peace among the one percenters. I was delighted to see him leave. He will live the rest of his life in corporate la-la land!
 
 
+63 # REDPILLED 2015-07-10 10:19
Holder's boss, Obama, refused to push Holder to prosecute the bankers, just as Obama refused to prosecute the Bush regime torturers.

Meanwhile, Iceland prosecuted and jailed the banksters/fraud sters there, and has recovered quite well from the 2008 Great Recession.
 
 
+12 # HowardMH 2015-07-10 11:45
Obama the Wimp, Obama the Wimp, Obama the Wimp totally bought and paid for by Wall Street and Big money.
 
 
+38 # economagic 2015-07-10 10:24
"Holder is a cynic of a type that's increasingly common in Washington."

Unfortunately, so is his erstwhile boss, who voted for immunity for the acquiescence of the telecom firms in allowing US intelligence agencies to use their equipment to hoover data on millions of Americans. Those same telecom firms are now suing the FCC for attempting to block them for giving us less service than we pay for, a practice for which AT&T was recently fined $100,000, which they are of course contesting.

Tell me Obama didn't know he was appointing an attorney general who would treat Wall Street with kid gloves. Tell me it was not made clear to him by those who financed his campaigns that this was what he was expected to do. Tell me that he put up a fight.

I voted for Kerry, which I swore I would not do if he maintained his position on continuing the wars. Not only did he maintain his support for the wars: He conceded even before all the votes were counted, when there was a nationwide task force waiting to challenge suspicious tallies (which appeared a day or two after the "election").

I voted Green the next two times. NEXT!

Let the "thumbs down" from the Obamaniacs begin!
 
 
-11 # ericlipps 2015-07-10 14:18
You voted Green in 2008 and 2012? What did that get you, besides self-satisfaction?

Ask some of the 90,000 folks who voted for Ralph Nader in Florida in 2000 what can come of casting your ballot for a doomed candidate because you don't like the lesser of evils among the two major contenders.
 
 
+21 # A_Har 2015-07-10 16:39
Quoting ericlipps:
You voted Green in 2008 and 2012? What did that get you, besides self-satisfaction?

Ask some of the 90,000 folks who voted for Ralph Nader in Florida in 2000 what can come of casting your ballot for a doomed candidate because you don't like the lesser of evils among the two major contenders.

And what did you get? A GUY WHO WAS THE PRIME PROMOTER OF THE TPP! And that was only one of many moves *he took against us.*

So, I had no part in that meaning I did not vote against my own interests even if I did not "win."

My friend you can't win by losing, and Obama worked against your interests and YOU voted for that. I did not. You voted for the guy who screwed you.
 
 
+35 # reiverpacific 2015-07-10 10:32
"Just because I'm at Covington doesn't mean I will abandon the public interest work,"!!! (Quote from article).
Talk about double-speak a la Orwell's 1984?!
Mr. "Slap on the wrist, nod-nod, wink-wink" utterly defines the nepotistic nature of US government "Money-is-power "; not that it's unique to this country -just more intense.
Democracy is still a distant dream, Oligarchy is the reality!
 
 
+3 # wrknight 2015-07-13 23:06
Quoting reiverpacific:
"Just because I'm at Covington doesn't mean I will abandon the public interest work,"!!! (Quote from article).
Talk about double-speak a la Orwell's 1984?!
Mr. "Slap on the wrist, nod-nod, wink-wink" utterly defines the nepotistic nature of US government "Money-is-power"; not that it's unique to this country -just more intense.
Democracy is still a distant dream, Oligarchy is the reality!

Not oligarchy - fascism is the reality.
 
 
+2 # LtDan65 2015-07-14 00:19
facistic oligarchy
 
 
+28 # Greg Scott 2015-07-10 11:11
Obama's chance to be a really popular...and populist...pres ident went out the window when he appointed Holder and Geithner. The country, left and right, would have been solidly behind him...or anyone...who went after the architects of the financial bust with the enthusiasm of...oh, say Bush 1.

You want to know what the real cost of racism is...just follow the money. Real justice will come when we deal with that.

Bringing down the Stars and Bars...while fine and long past due...is nothing compared to undoing the financial damage that has been done to...all Americans...by entrenched money interests.

But hey, I'm preaching to the choir...

Work like hell for Bernie...maybe it's not too late.
 
 
+8 # Anonymot 2015-07-10 11:37
Holder is about as good at banking law as Obama is with constitutional law.

I'd love for someone to convince me that democracy is not an irreparably destroyed idea in America.

I'd love for someone to convince me that the public interest is not an irreparably destroyed idea in America.

I'd love for someone to convince me that Bernie Sanders is not an irreparably destroyed idea in American politics.

I'd love for someone to convince me that corruption is not a permanently imbedded feature in America.

I'm not conspiracy oriented, but I've become convinced that there's a great sub rosa machine out there that has completely controlled and corrupted our political system(s) for decades. It is run by garbage-brained people who seek to dominate the world via global politico-econom ic means.

I used to laugh when people said the CIA assasinated the Kennedys. I've stopped laughing.

I thought the birth certificate of Obama was a joke that only idiots like Trump or Cheney would believe. Then I realized that true or false was completely beside the point. A freshly manufactured one is as effective a control mechanism as the real thing. So guess who manufactures the best false documents in the world.

Kessler is here, and Koestler, and Orwell, and Mein Kampf.

The last true words were by Varofakis. The last neofascist ones by Merkel, because they know what she said on the phone. The same is true of Hillary's mails and messages to her intimates - who are not Bill.
 
 
+7 # lsd 2015-07-11 10:53
"I'm not conspiracy oriented, but I've become convinced that there's a great sub rosa machine out there that has completely controlled and corrupted our political system(s) for decades. It is run by garbage-brained people who seek to dominate the world via global politico-econom ic means."

For years I argued with family and friends that it was the epitome of optimistic stupidity to believe that money doesn't control governments.
 
 
+3 # A_Har 2015-07-11 16:09
Quoting lsd:
For years I argued with family and friends that it was the epitome of optimistic stupidity to believe that money doesn't control governments.

Chris Hedges: America's Mania for Positive Thinking and Denial of Reality Will Be Our Downfall

http://www.alternet.org/news-amp-politics/chris-hedges-americas-mania-positive-thinking-and-denial-reality-will-be-our?akid=13146.38306.4QzEwt&rd=1&src=newsletter1036987&t=7
The ridiculous positivism, the belief that we are headed toward some glorious future, defies reality.

By Chris Hedges / Truthdig
May 27, 2015
 
 
+2 # lsd 2015-07-12 09:36
Humans are just like any other life form on the planet: beed and continue. The best way to do that is gain power and money. Granted we can try to deny our genetic programming. But, it should come as no surprise that Holder, Obama et al are in it for themselves. The stupidity comes in when we deny the truth about ourselves. Thanks for the Hedges' essay. It gave me a lot to think about, because Hedges doesn't get it either and along with others creates an elaborate explanation to avoid the truth about our intrinsic nature.
 
 
+3 # A_Har 2015-07-12 10:08
Quoting lsd:
Humans are just like any other life form on the planet: beed and continue. The best way to do that is gain power and money. Granted we can try to deny our genetic programming.

It isn't all genetic with humans as CULTURE has a whole lot to do with it. There are cultures who have learned to not screw over their ecosystems and they live sustainably. This also means they do not overpopulate or ruin the nest they inhabit in nature. However, ours is not one of them.
 
 
+1 # lsd 2015-07-12 13:07
The only culture I see is ultimately based on the genetic drive to breed and survive. Very few sit back and reflect on the insanity of allowing a self-replicatin g molecule to cause such a sorrowful shit-show. The "denial of reality" is part of what we are, if not, we wouldn't exist.
 
 
+2 # A_Har 2015-07-12 13:49
Quoting lsd:
The only culture I see is ultimately based on the genetic drive to breed and survive. Very few sit back and reflect on the insanity of allowing a self-replicating molecule to cause such a sorrowful shit-show. The "denial of reality" is part of what we are, if not, we wouldn't exist.

That is because our Western culture has overtaken and subsumed so many others; it is the dominant culture of globalism. People CAN choose other ways to live.

Breeding is optional. I did not birth any children myself so it is not a given. At this point, in the "shit-show" I am very glad I didn't.

You might like Daniel Quinn's books of the Ismael series. They are novels, but in them he examines our current "Mother culture."

Daniel Quinn on Amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/Daniel-Quinn/e/B00455SLCK/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1436730422&sr=1-2-ent
 
 
+1 # lsd 2015-07-12 16:57
I'm sure Daniel Quinn gives people hope and that is exactly what is wrong. No one is a popular author without that prerequisite. So, we come back full circle to the silly optimistic delusion, such as people can choose other ways to live. I'm more than certain there are scads of people who desperately want to get out of this shit-show. But, please let me and the armys of the impoverished know how to do it. Wait til we hit 10 billion. ps. You were not only wise to not have children, but also kind.
 
 
+1 # A_Har 2015-07-13 13:41
Quoting lsd:
I'm sure Daniel Quinn gives people hope and that is exactly what is wrong. No one is a popular author without that prerequisite. So, we come back full circle to the silly optimistic delusion, such as people can choose other ways to live. I'm more than certain there are scads of people who desperately want to get out of this shit-show. But, please let me and the armys of the impoverished know how to do it. Wait til we hit 10 billion. ps. You were not only wise to not have children, but also kind.

No...that is not what the Ishmael books are about. They simply frame the problem that our cultural paradigm has created. He proposes no solution. However, you have to be able to know there is a problem to even begin to deal with it. His novels are not hopeful, but they are useful in providing a platform to consider our dilemma.

Here PDF is a download link for one of them...
My Ishmael:
http://www.downloadprovider.me/en/download-z345459763.html

No guarantee that it will work for you though. It is an easy read and often available in the library.

We are all embedded in a culture we did not create, and it has rules we have to follow to live. Unfortunately for all of us, those rules are killing the basis of our lives. Still, not many people even recognise that.

As to the "silly delusion," we can choose to live at a much lower level of consumption. I have done this most of my life.
 
 
+7 # angelfish 2015-07-10 12:22
This Country has become SO corrupt and Morally Bankrupt it's hard to have ANY pride in BEING American any more. HOW do these "men" (?) look at themselves in the mirror each day when they shave their duplicitous faces? I suppose it's naive of me to wish for better days like those from my childhood in the 50's where everyone liked Ike, there was enough for ALL and Mothers could stay HOME to raise the children while the Daddies went to work at a Job that PAID a Living Wage to support them all. Hard to believe that there WAS a time like that in THIS country. Hopefully, if Bernie Sanders wins the Presidency we'll have it AGAIN! The "ME First-ers" have certainly brought us low but we Can and WILL turn it all around!
 
 
+5 # CelticNavigator 2015-07-10 14:09
Great stuff, Angelfish! As a deep historian I also delve into the past looking for answers and inspirations. I posted this in an RSN article on Holder a few days ago, but I was late to the party... I hope you enjoy its calling into the past for courage to face the future:

"[Re a distant/detache d expression Eric was wearing in the earlier article's photo] I would be a very poor reader of human nature, indeed, if it did not occur to me that Eric Holder may well have been contemplating the fact that his modern servitude to wealth and power is not very different than the servitude to wealth and power his ancestors may have been forcefully subjected to.

"But my dear Eric, the only thing that shackles you like a slave to wealth and power is your own lack of strength, will and integrity. You are fully capable of freeing yourself and walking away from evil men. Your ancestors were not.

"Hear your ancestors whispering to you- they are counting on YOU to become the fully empowered and self-actualized person they could not become, no matter their personal bravery. Take courage from this poignant and relevant Viking Death Prayer that endows men's lives with value and worth by invoking our ancestors:"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ZtY4aEMwps
 
 
+8 # Radscal 2015-07-10 18:02
I'm afraid that idyllic 50s you describe was only available to a portion of the U.S. public.

While the corporate media showed us photos of Ike playing golf, he was actually busily signing off on the violent overthrow of the governments of Iran and Guatemala and the failed one in Cuba, funding the French invasion of IndoChina in their attempt to reinstall their pre-WW II colonial rule, increasing the nuclear arsenal by 1,000 times, etc. etc. etc.

And of course, dark-skinned people in the U.S. were lucky to have a job for both the father and the mother, and likely barely got the bills paid at that.
 
 
+4 # CelticNavigator 2015-07-11 01:57
Yeah - all that, and hundreds of thousands of housewives were addicted to legal prescription "mother's little helper" barbituates intended to keep them sane during the Duck and Cover Cold War years with way too many Baby Boomer kids under foot and most families only having one car to shuttle all its members around. Men car-pooled to work so their wives could have use of the car one day of the week. I was THERE.
 
 
+9 # Phillybuster 2015-07-10 12:29
Holder's soft landing is as surprising as the sun rising in the east. Is there anyone who follows these issues that thought Holder would not return to a cushy Wall Street job? Obama, Holder, Hillary - any one of them could change a nine-dollar bill in threes.
 
 
+15 # Harvard72 2015-07-10 13:14
You know what is the most distressing aspect of the evaluation of Eric Holder? The fact that everything that Matt Taibbai has written about him is truly reprehensible, but the Republican Right criticized him from day 1 for Red Herring issues like Fast and Furious (which I cannot remember even what it was about, just that Sean Hannity and that crowd brayed about it all the time.) If the Republican Right would learn what really mattered and then criticized Holder AND OBAMA for things that needed to be noted (rather than imaginary claims of Socialism), there might be hope for us. But this story of Holder as the agent of the Banks, while pretending to be doing "public interest work" as AG is what is truly wrong in a nutshell. (And "nutshell" can be interpreted as you like.)
 
 
+11 # Radscal 2015-07-10 18:05
The Republican outrage at Holder was kabuki theater designed to distract the public from the consistent government policies of serving the 0.01%.
 
 
+3 # A_Har 2015-07-11 15:28
Quoting Radscal:
The Republican outrage at Holder was kabuki theater designed to distract the public from the consistent government policies of serving the 0.01%.

Phony outrage. They are just jealous because if they held the presidency, we know they would match the malfeasance or do "even better."
 
 
+6 # Radscal 2015-07-11 23:51
Phony outrage to make their base believe there are substantial differences between the two halves of he duopoly.
 
 
+3 # WestWinds 2015-07-10 14:13
Go here and scroll down to second picture:

http://www.travelhunch.com/2015/06/beautiful-abandoned-places-of-the-world-13345/2/

One picture says it all.
 
 
0 # lewagner 2015-07-10 18:47
Google "eric older trentadue oklahoma city" for some more about out intrepid Attorney General.
He goes way back.
 
 
+4 # nice2bgreat 2015-07-10 21:19
.
I'm looking for the pro-Hillary folk on this page.

...

Crickets... Crickets.
.
 
 
0 # fletch1165 2015-07-12 21:11
That warhawk is a mass murderer and baby killer. What a filthy disgusting immoral lying person. No wonder Bill went elsewhere with this frigid corporate goon that kills people as Secratary of State and sits in the lawn chair buddy buddy with McCain in the Green Zone prior preaching the wonders of U.S. occupation for Israel....
 
 
+4 # John Puma 2015-07-11 00:56
Holder says: ""Just because I'm at Covington doesn't mean I will abandon the public interest work,"

Oh, certainly, it was because being US Atty General BROKE you of doing public interest work that you will do no more.
 
 
+3 # Kwamined 2015-07-12 08:33
Eric Holder is a traitor guilty of treason for reneging on his oath of office. He's a House Niggah for the House Niggah-in-Chief , Barry Obama.
 
 
+2 # fletch1165 2015-07-12 21:07
What a friggin hero. He fits right in to Hitler's Reich. Its a sad period in America. I never thought we would go lower than the illegal Bush years. But this has been just an extension of all of it. A total nightmare for the World. These people are scum. All of them. Where is their morality? Leaders have no morale compass at all. If anything they resemble Al Capone.
 

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