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Gibson writes: "To all you would-be elected officials looking for my generation's support at the polls, listen closely - get populist or get ready to lose bad."

Carl Gibson appearing on MSNBC to discuss the Affordable Care Act. (photo: MSNBC)
Carl Gibson appearing on MSNBC to discuss the Affordable Care Act. (photo: MSNBC)


Open Letter to Democrats From a Disillusioned Young Voter

By Carl Gibson, Reader Supported News

07 November 14

 

ear Democrats,

Are you listening? President Obama says he hears us. He says that people don’t have a reason to show up to vote if the politicians they have to choose from don’t motivate them. He’s partially right. But that’s only part of a much larger problem. To all you would-be elected officials looking for my generation’s support at the polls, listen closely – get populist or get ready to lose bad.

2014’s low voter turnout was historic. Voter turnout actually hasn’t been this low since the 1940s. As Mother Jones pointed out, voter turnout for people under 30 was dismal. In this election, people like me only made up 12 percent of those who voted, while people aged 60 and older made up almost 40 percent of total voters. In 2012, when President Obama was re-elected and Congressional Democrats made gains in the House and Senate, millennials made up almost one-fifth of all voters, and voters 60 and older made up just 25 percent of the electorate, bringing us a little closer to a tie. It isn’t hard to see the difference – this year, Republicans steamrolled you, Democrats, because most of us stayed home and let our Fox-watching uncles and grandparents decide on who was going to represent everyone else.

So how do older people pick who runs Congress? Like every other voting bloc, they pick the ones who run on issues most important to them. And as Vox reported, data consistently shows that younger people want their tax dollars spent on education and job creation. Older voters want their money spent on Social Security and war. The Republicans who swept the U.S. Senate ran largely on fear campaigns over ISIS, promising to be more hawkish than their opponents in an eagerness to pour money and troops into Iraq and Syria to snuff out America’s newest boogeyman.

Contrast the unified Republican message with the profound silence from you Democrats on addressing the trillion-dollar student debt crisis, rampant inequality and underemployment, and your collective fear of openly embracing economic populism, and you cook up what we saw on Tuesday night. Older people showed up, highly motivated to elect war hawks. Younger people mostly stayed home, disillusioned with the only alternative on the ballot who didn’t even talk about the issues affecting our lives every day.

The few of us who did show up to vote largely did it to support state ballot initiatives that actually mattered in our daily lives. We still voted to raise the minimum wage in 4 states to a slightly more respectable amount, and to $15 an hour in San Francisco. We voted for a week of paid sick days in Massachusetts, and for marijuana legalization in three more states (okay, well, DC isn’t a state yet, but it definitely will be by the time we’re grandparents). We voted to turn nonviolent drug offenses from felonies into misdemeanors in California. We even boosted high voter turnout in Michigan for Gary Peters, a Democrat who made climate change – something we’ll have to confront long after the boomers are gone – his top issue. We just didn’t vote for Democrats who haven’t done anything for us since we voted for them in 2012, and who brazenly took our votes for granted this year.

Even though the Republicans have made it clear they won’t raise the minimum wage, legalize marijuana, or address climate change as long as they’re in power, they at least have a unified message that appeals to enough people who share their values. They can also communicate that message in a confident way. The Republican platform comes in easy-to-remember, tweet-sized sentences. We all know their buzzwords – “national security,” “family values,” “free markets.” That may translate to endless war, homophobia, and corporate feudalism for the better-informed, but for most people, those are catch phrases they can get behind.

You Democrats, on the other hand, looked pitiful in the year leading up to the midterms. You didn’t seem to stand for anything in particular, you just pointed the finger at the other guy, told us they were bad, and that you weren’t like them. That’s not enough. Take a risk, be bold. Get behind Elizabeth Warren’s 0.75 percent interest rate for student loans. Allow student debt to be abolished with bankruptcy. Push for single-payer healthcare, or at the very least a public health insurance option. Need some catchy buzzwords? Try “affordable education,” “good jobs,” and “healthy families.”

President Obama hit the nail on the head – we won’t show up and vote for you if you aren’t offering us anything real. If Democrats want to stay relevant, they’ll have to learn to stop taking us for granted and actually make an effort to get our votes. Simply banking on being the lesser evil and having that be enough won’t cut it any longer.



Carl Gibson, 26, is co-founder of US Uncut, a nationwide creative direct-action movement that mobilized tens of thousands of activists against corporate tax avoidance and budget cuts in the months leading up to the Occupy Wall Street movement. Carl and other US Uncut activists are featured in the documentary "We're Not Broke," which premiered at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival. He currently lives in Madison, Wisconsin. You can contact him at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , and follow him on twitter at @uncutCG.

Reader Supported News is the Publication of Origin for this work. Permission to republish is freely granted with credit and a link back to Reader Supported News.

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+81 # ziply 2014-11-07 13:31
Part 1
I am sick to death of your kind of shallow, selfish, short-sighted, ignorant extortion. What's in it for you, spoiled little boy? How about the half-chance - yes, only half - you're going to get to put on the Federal bench judges who value individual rights over the rights of corporations, defendents' rights over the might of the prosecution, the environment over corporate profits. Those judges will likely be on the bench for a generation, where they can undo the will of the voters just as the Roberts Court has been doing. Perhaps you should be interested in who gets to nominate and confirm the judges.

How about the half-chance - yes, only half - you're going to get to put in office people who understand and embrace science. Who won't try to control who you love, who you have sex with, what forms of sex are legal, and whether or not you and your partner(s) can use devices that prevent unwanted consequences, such as pregnancy and disease?
 
 
+56 # Floe 2014-11-07 16:16
This entire system is going to fall ontop of itself it is so heinous and cumbersome. I don't know why the young people are not slashing tires with the indignities the "baby boomers" are heaping on them in order to continue their ongoing comforts. Why do young people go to fight wars that old privileged people create? Why do young people insist on going to the expensive universities and heaping debt on themselves? Especially since those universities prop up the very system that is eating its young? Why do their parents let them? I think it's because we're all plugged into a belief system based on the past but which no longer holds and which is becoming more grotesque by the minute. No point in trying to fix it. We can however build something better that gives sane people another option. Sane people don't want to be involved in this system of war, poverty, rigged advantages and one-upmanship. There is no freedom if we can only choose one currency for example. All you disillusioned young people, use your passions to build new systems and let's start experimenting!
 
 
+247 # MEBrowning 2014-11-07 16:42
Floe, please don't lump all Baby boomers in with the oligarchs — most of us older people are part of the 99%, and our "ongoing comforts" are few and getting fewer. There are many, many sane Baby Boomers, just as there are many sane people of all generations. Such generalizing does more harm than good because it keeps us nipping at each others' heels, when we should be working together, regardless of age.
 
 
+19 # kyzipster 2014-11-10 08:51
I'm shocked at the number of younger people who resent paying into Social Security. They see themselves as the only hope for the future while they've already been brainwashed by conservative propaganda, telling them they're supporting old people. As if retired people are 'welfare queens' draining the younger generation. Divide and conquer, it's the GOP's Southern Strategy, it goes far beyond race.
 
 
0 # Natan 2015-03-23 23:54
You are ignorant to think that the GOP is brainwashing people into not supporting our elderly...grow up and realize that it is your flawed thought process that is the problem. The social security trust fund was transferred and spent by congress under the not so watchful eyes of the baby boomers in the 70's...the younger generations aren't even going to see a SS payment as YOU will also see YOUR SS disappear...WOU LD YOU PAY FOR IT? Where were you when congress transferred the SS trust fund into the general account? Probably living cushy with your company health benefits and pension plans...maybe you should ask your children or grand children what kind of company health care or pension plan they are getting these days...
 
 
+4 # RLF 2014-11-09 08:39
They are too busy playing video games. Things will only change when they can no longer afford to keep themselves numb. Quickly coming...the backlash will be a bitch!
 
 
+14 # WestWinds 2014-11-10 06:22
#Floe Quote:
"I don't know why the young people are not slashing tires with the indignities the "baby boomers" are heaping on them in order to continue their ongoing comforts."
--- I don't know what you are talking about here. What a gross generalization. .. that doesn't fit. I live on $479.00, a month from SS bc I had to quit working to stay home to take care of my bedridden mother (who is still alive) which roundly impacted my working quarters. If this is what you call "ongoing comforts" you have a pretty bizarre working definition of comforts.
 
 
+120 # conniejo 2014-11-07 17:08
Please! Let's stop fighting one another. We're on the same side. I understand what both Carl and ziply are saying and the frustrations they express. There are many of us older folks (I'm 65) who work our hearts out for student load reform, health care for all, and jobs, jobs, jobs. The place we can make a difference is in the primaries. Just as the tea party did for super-conservat ive Republicans, progressives and populists need to organize around finding and fighting for people like us to win the Democratic nomination. That's how Elizabeth Warren got elected. After the candidates are determined by the primaries, none of us should sit out the election. I absolutely agree that the main crop of Dems are just a shade to the left of the hard core Republicans, and only on some issues. But even that difference is important. We know the Repubs will vote to take away the ACA, and as flawed as it is, the ACA is the only hope that some folks have for getting decent health care. All elections matter, even when the choices are bad and only-slightly-l ess bad. If we want our people in Washington, we need to bust our butts to get them through the primaries.
 
 
0 # Natan 2015-03-24 00:06
if you take out a student loan you pay the student loan back yourself...peri od. If you want health insurance you pay for your health insurance...per iod. If you mortgage a home you pay for the mortgage of your home...period. If you want car insurance you pay for it yourself...peri od!!! You enabled people to not accept the responsibility of the contracts that they make with other individuals. How can this country survive? We as Americans can't and won't keep our word with each other? The ACA is not affordable..ask anyone...it has made it more unaffordable for those of us that are actually still working...you are 65 and no longer in touch with the reality of what is truly happening...ple ase stop voting...the DEMS are not your daddys party anymore...
 
 
+81 # pbbrodie 2014-11-07 18:18
I'm not a millennial, I'm a boomer but I agree with what Gibson says and don't see it as shallow, selfish, short sighted or ignorant at all. Your comment is absurd and reinforces what he said.
Nowhere did I ever see or hear any democratic candidates saying anything about nominating judges, mush less all of the progressive issues Gibson writes about. Exactly what do you find selfish about his post anyway? All of the things you wrote about, candidates who embrace sicence, won't try to control your life, who you have sex with, etc., were all things the Democrats did NOT talk about, exactly what Gibson is saying.
You comment is so bass akwards that it defies comprehension.
 
 
+3 # WestWinds 2014-11-10 06:47
Quoting pbbrodie:
I'm not a millennial, I'm a boomer but I agree with what Gibson says and don't see it as shallow, selfish, short sighted or ignorant at all.


--- I agree with Gibson's complaints, it's the reactionary handling I don't like. They all should have showed their solidarity against the Right by voting the best candidates possible (even if that's Green). What I object to is they just chose to blow it off, and that was the worst handling possible.
 
 
+114 # pegasus4508 2014-11-07 18:21
I agree with what Carl Gibson said, I VOTED and I am 58 years old. His point is to energize the voting block we have, we MUST run Democrats who are not ashamed to BE Democrats. Not the ones running away from the president. Not the ones running from the ACA. Not the democrats who have not promoted the administration' s record of cutting the deficit, lowering unemployment and passing healthcare.
So, MY message is the same. RUN as a damn Democrat or LOSS. It is that simple.
 
 
+8 # RLF 2014-11-09 08:37
Problem is saying to the people and doing what they want and also pleasing their corporate masters. They can't do both without lying to one party...so they waffle and stand for nothing. I voted Green and will continue.
 
 
-9 # Rain17 2014-11-09 14:49
Then you are supporting the Republican Party. And you supporting heinous policies. And you are voting to take away peoples' healthcare and civil rights. Given the nature of the US electoral system you are enabling the forces you claim to aggressively oppose.
 
 
+2 # WestWinds 2014-11-10 06:54
Quoting Rain17:
Then you are supporting the Republican Party. And you supporting heinous policies. And you are voting to take away peoples' healthcare and civil rights. Given the nature of the US electoral system you are enabling the forces you claim to aggressively oppose.

--- You wouldn't say this if you were truly familiar with the Green Party's platform and planks.

Our system was designed to include other parties, but so far, the Right has been able to convert the system and the Democrats to a two party/one party system. Keeping out other parties is only playing into their hands.

If everyone who has a complaint with the Democratic Party went Green Party, we'd have our new government and the Right would be hamstrung.
 
 
+2 # Rain17 2014-11-10 15:31
If everyone who has a complaint with the Democratic Party went Green Party, we'd have our new government and the Right would be hamstrung.

--------------------------------------------

But that is never going to happen, given the US electoral system. The Greens may able to compete in college towns and places like San Francisco, but they will never a viable political party in the United States because it is a winner-take-all system.
 
 
0 # WestWinds 2014-11-14 10:36
Quoting Rain17:
But that is never going to happen, given the US electoral system. The Greens may able to compete in college towns and places like San Francisco, but they will never a viable political party in the United States because it is a winner-take-all system.


--- I don't agree. Here in the states, the Green Party is seen as some kind of fringe element, but in Europe it is far more mainstream and viable. It's just that the Conservatives (both Left and Right) have managed to brainwash us into thinking they are the only parties out there. They are, in terms of funding, but no one is making any moves to curb the corporate campaign funding.

The problem I find is that no one either looks at the Green Party platform, or they are just too afraid to vote outside the box. What's the difference: vote for fake Democrats and lose to the Republicans (2014 elections) or vote Green and lose to the Republicans? Aren't Democrats supposed to be liberals?
People are continuing to vote Democratic because they perceive them not as liberals but as Republican lite and believe that only Republican something could or should run this country. This is crazy.
 
 
+3 # A_Har 2014-11-10 11:47
I am a Boomer. I am so disgusted with the DEMs, I gave up being one. I can't stand the Rethugs either. Both are sellouts to the corporations.
 
 
+3 # A_Har 2014-11-10 11:48
I am a Boomer. I am so disgusted with the DEMs, I gave up being one. I can't stand the Rethugs either. Both are sellouts to the corporations.
 
 
-2 # Natan 2015-03-24 00:13
i think you meant LOSE...but you can't fix stupid...I hope you do run as openly COMMUNIST DEMOCRATS...bec ause they will "loss"... I mean LOSE!!!
 
 
-2 # Natan 2015-03-24 00:16
can I say COMMUNIST DEMOCRAT!!!
 
 
+9 # Diane_Wilkinson_Trefethen_aka_tref 2014-11-07 20:30
How pompous! Why the hell should ANYONE vote for your candidate when that candidate stands ready to spinelessly follow the hawks into war. And let's not forget it's not you, old person, whose boots will be on the ground, or blown off if you're not lucky. You think TALKING about equality is good enough. So did the Tories in 1770. Well it's not, not by a long shot.

And you are wrong if you think that keeping the Senate would have caused Obama to appoint progressive judges. He wouldn't have bothered to try. Just nominate some hack the Reps would confirm. That would've been good enough. Too many of his appointments have been pro-Wall Street, pro-money, anti-taxpayer all along. Why would that have changed?

Your "half-chance" is a pipe dream. It's not real.
 
 
+33 # sdraymond 2014-11-07 21:07
[quote name="ziply"]Pa rt 1
I am sick to death of your kind of shallow, selfish, short-sighted, ignorant extortion. What's in it for you, spoiled little boy? How about the half-chance - yes, only half - you're going to get to put on the Federal bench judges who value individual rights over the rights of corporations, defendents' rights over the might of the prosecution, the environment over corporate profits. Those judges will likely be on the bench for a generation, where they can undo the will of the voters just as the Roberts Court has been doing. Perhaps you should be interested in who gets to nominate and confirm the judges.]

You are right Ziply, but so is Carl Gibson. Both of you are passionate about your points of view, but it does not help to snipe at each other. Carl is not the enemy. Save your vitriol for the multi-billionai re Randians who bought this election and work with like minded people like Carl to make sure they don't buy another one.
 
 
+75 # CarlGibson 2014-11-07 21:19
For the record, I was one of the few youth voters who participated in this election. Not because I was particularly jazzed about my candidates, but because I didn't want cuckoos representing me in Washington. I also personally knew the guy who won the state senate race, and mainly showed up for him.

Also, I'm not "entitled" because I want politicians gunning for my vote to acknowledge issues my generation is going through. On the contrary, these politicians are entitled in thinking that I'm obligated to vote for them simply because they aren't as bad as the other guys.

Isn't it obvious that Democrats are saying now is President Obama's time to be the progressive we've been counting on him to be, yet he just committed $3.2 billion and a whole mess of troops to a new war in the Middle East? Is it any wonder that people are uninspired to vote for Democrats?

Rather than continuously beating their heads into the wall, Democrats should consider that their crushing loss as a result of lower turnout maybe means that they need to mix it up to get more voters to show up for them?

Young people showed up for Obama and the Dems in 2008 and 2012, yet they failed to deliver either time. We aren't obligated to vote for them, they're obligated to work hard for our vote. That's what true representatives should do.
 
 
+35 # futhark 2014-11-07 21:51
I quite agree here. Why support Democrats when they just keep dong the same old stuff we were getting under Cheney/Bush: the same wars in the Middle East, the same state surveillance apparatus violating our rights, the same persecution of whistleblowers, the same bailouts of investment banks, etc., etc..?, all reasons I, a boomer, am no longer a registered Democrat and no longer believe their saccharine "hope and change" campaign promises. Democrats need to promote real alternatives to the Republican platform and act upon them when elected.
 
 
+11 # nyambol 2014-11-08 07:43
You're obligated to participate in the electoral process. Period. That's called "citizenship." You think the political parties are obligated to poll you and ask you what you want and then deliver it, like the pizza that comes to your door while you're watching election returns. *That* is a sense of entitlement.

The individuals who are on the ballot are there because hundreds, thousands, millions of supporters were doing the dirty work behind the scenes to get them on the ballot and then elected. It's that simple.

If you want "your" candidates on the ballot, do the needful.

"One of these days, you know you've got to get going,
Out of the door and down on the street, all alone."
 
 
+26 # Rain17 2014-11-08 13:35
Here is the other issue. I think too many people here want immediate results. Do you think the right thought like that? Do you think the right, back in the mid-1960s after Goldwater lost, became disillusioned, cried, and took their ball and went home?

No they organized. They began a decades-long campaign to swing Americans to their views. They didn't allow one or two bad election cycles or candidates who disappointed them to slow down. They kept steadily chipping away at their goals, winning a seat here or there, a school board here or two, a mayor's office here or there, a House set, etc, etc.

What I sense from the left is an inability to realize that this is not a short-term struggle. This is a struggle that will span years and decades. It will be more than one or two administrations or electoral cycles.

What is missing from the left is a long-term effort at persuasion. That means changing the culture and opinions on issues of importance. Right now most Americans, even many liberals, accept conservative assumptions on major public policy issues. Going forward, if liberal groups really want to make long-last change, I think they are going to have to launch a long-term effort to change these perceptions.
 
 
0 # WestWinds 2014-11-10 07:07
[quote name="Rain17"]H ere is the other issue. I think too many people here want immediate results. ..."

--- I think you do the people here an injustice. I've been involved since 1989.
This is a sweeping generalization that really doesn't hold water.
 
 
+1 # Rain17 2014-11-10 15:34
Well, looking at the posts here savaging, Obama that is the perception I get. From what I hear it seems like everyone expected everything to change immediately after the 2008 election. And that was unrealistic.

Look at the ACA. People here savage him because it wasn't single-payer even though any person rationally looking at the issue would realize that the votes were not there for it.

Yet I wonder how many single-payer activists continue to push for it after the Clinton Healthcare bill died. I wonder how many people launched messaging campaigns and tried to change policy at the state and local level. In essence they didn't do the groundwork.
 
 
+15 # Rain17 2014-11-08 13:40
What this means is that liberal groups are going to have to realize:

1) This is about more than one or two election cycles or candidates. This is a long-term effort that will last years, if not decades.
2) You will lose elections, legislative battles, and have setbacks. That is to be expected.
3) You will have to make difficult compromises that the purists consider sellouts to move the ball forward. That doesn't mean giving up on the long-term goal, but accepting that the current political reality will only yield so much.
4) You will have to change American opinion on issues. And this is where the left is lacking and that is in persuasion money and marketing. That means running messaging campaigns independent of a candidate and promoting progressive views through various media outlets, think tanks, studies, experts, and so forth.
5) You will have to vote in every election, no matter how flawed, in your opinion, the candidates are. Given the nature of the US electoral system that means sometimes "voting the lesser of two evils".
6) This also means investing heavily at the local level for offices like school board, county clerk, and so forth. Change can be more easily implemented at the local level. And those offices are the backbench for Congress and the Senate.
7) Identify promising candidates. Until a progressive can win in a hostile electorate, you will only have moderate Democrats.
 
 
+15 # Rain17 2014-11-08 13:31
Carl, did you ever consider that perhaps Obama has had to deal with a Congress determined to stop EVERYTHING he wants to do at EVERY turn? Did you ever consider that you and other people here aren't the only people he has to consider? Not everyone in this country shares the same viewpoints as you or me on the issues.

That is not to say that I have had issues with Obama's leadership. I agree that he has tried to be bipartisan too much and has cut deals prematurely that hurt him.

But I also look at the Congresses he has had, all of whom except for his fist two years were hostile to his agenda. Given what he has had to deal with I think he has done a good job.
 
 
+12 # xflowers 2014-11-08 18:05
Carl, I'm glad you clarify your position here without invoking the generational divide. Your generation felt abandoned by politicians who don't care about you. That feeling is cross generational, let me assure you. That's why there is voter discontent throughout the country among all age groups. Nearly everyone feels sold out, but with younger people, it started much earlier. I was able to go to state university when state universities were subsidized to keep tuition low. I took out student loans too, but not enough to bankrupt me for most of my life. I'm sympathetic. I'm also frustrated because I don't know what's going to happen in this country if enough people bounce back and forth from one party to the other until they realize they cannot find real representation in either party as you say your generation has already discovered. What will become of us? What will become of this great democratic experiment?
 
 
+6 # janla 2014-11-08 19:08
We older people could be feeling abandoned by young people at this point.
 
 
+2 # janla 2014-11-08 19:08
We older people could be feeling abandoned by young people at this point.
 
 
+6 # janla 2014-11-08 19:06
It's pathetic that young people didn't vote because things aren't going the way they want them to right now. This is all about process; it's about satisfaction and disillusionment , but most of all, it's about going on even when we feel less hopeful. Maybe all of those non-voting young people could have made a difference in this election, but no - they didn't bother to vote. No voting, no whining.
 
 
+1 # WestWinds 2014-11-10 07:03
#CarlGibson: [quote} "... Isn't it obvious that Democrats are saying now is President Obama's time to be the progressive we've been counting on him to be, yet he just committed $3.2 billion and a whole mess of troops to a new war in the Middle East? Is it any wonder that people are uninspired to vote for Democrats? ..."

--- I agree. I was reading just the other day that in his time in office, Obama has launched offensives against no less than 17 other countries. And,as far as I know, this all has been in the pursuit of (oil,gas,minera l) the assets belonging to these other countries and their people on behalf of the uber rich in this country. This is patently wrong.
 
 
+4 # NickAnast 2014-11-10 09:33
"Young people showed up for Obama and the Dems in 2008 and 2012, yet they failed to deliver either time. We aren't obligated to vote for them, they're obligated to work hard for our vote. That's what true representatives should do."

Really? Obama and the Dems repealed Don't Ask, Don't Tell; reformed health care in a way that allows "underemployed" 20-somethings to remain on their parents' insurance policies until they are 26 years old; put two women on the Supreme Court; ended the war in Iraq, committed to pulling troops out of Afghanistan, and refused to start wars with Iran, Syria, and North Korea; raised taxes on the wealthy; fought off GOP attempts to make a college education less affordable for the middle class; and changed immigration policy to allow some young undocumented immigrants to stay in the United States.

And that's not good enough for you? Do me a favor and move to Europe.
 
 
+17 # backwards_cinderella 2014-11-08 05:12
give me a break. the kid's right. there are giant issues at stake & the Dems are dropping the ball everywhere they go.

nobody wants to be taken for granted. you have to WORK for those votes. & you have a message that means something to your voters ... something they can believe in & is easy to repeat. remember KISS ... "keep it simple, stupid"? exactly that.
 
 
+8 # beardog 2014-11-08 22:47
Millennials new maxim...
"Ask not what I can do for my country, ask what my country can do for me."
 
 
+4 # Dalkenshield 2014-11-10 00:18
Here's my answer to you. Below is a "comment" on an article about the election in Richmond, CA in which a "Green Party" candidate beat a Democratic Party candidate:

"Here's some interesting partisan BS. The Chevron-sponsor ed candidates were Democrats, and were officially endorsed by the Democratic Party. Even though the winning mayoral candidate, progressive Tom Butt is a Democrat, the Democratic Party did NOT endorse him."

So much for the Democratic Party. Needless to say, to hell with the Republicans, too.
 
 
+5 # WestWinds 2014-11-10 06:30
And it's more than just the SCOTUS or science. I feel very betrayed by this younger generation who sat this one out. So many of us worked hard on these campaigns giving time, effort and money (we really don't have to spend) in order to try and save us from the digging claws of the Right and all of this was undone bc these kids decided not to bother. They need to learn the responsibilitie s that come with citizenship in this country.

A better approach would have been to go to the polls, put into office the best candidates available, and then replace any that are lacking with future elections. Thus, building ever upward to what we ultimately want.

Now, the Right has two years to push through every rotten piece of legislation they can think of, two years for them to sink their claws in deeper and deeper, two years to make sure they win the next time too by rigging all of the systems. I feel very betrayed and I wish these young people had used their brains a little bit better, bc I think they failed us and themselves with this decision.
 
 
0 # Natan 2015-03-23 23:28
you are a shortsighted and ignorant person. You are more concerned over someones sexual preference than the fiscal situation our country faces? You have had 6 years and counting...when are you going to face "the man in the mirror" and stop blaming the GOP for how crappy your life is? I am a conservaive and embrace science...you are a hater.
 
 
+67 # ziply 2014-11-07 13:33
Part 2
How about the half-chance - yes, only half - you're going to get to put in office people who aren't completely committed to all war, all the time to benefit the war billionaires; imprisoning a huge percentage of our black male population to benefit the prison industrial complex; privatizing public schools to benefit the for-profit-scho ols industry; further deregulating the financial industry; gutting what's left of the EPA; weakening the Clean Air and Clean Water acts; drilling for oil in ANWR -- I could go on and on and on and on and on and on.

Not enough for you?

The Republicans sure as hell are not going to give you those half-chances. If you think so, you have not been paying attention, either from incapacity or willful blindness. You think the Republicans give a [nsfw] about your struggle to pay your student loan? You are nothing but dollar signs to them.
 
 
+18 # dquandle 2014-11-07 15:37
You think Obama gives a flying f^&k about whether you can pay off your extortionate student loans???

His boy Arne Duncan, who he inserted in the f%$king position is running the Department of "Education" as a siphon, deftly harpooning the arteries of the poor and working class, sucking profit from the extraordinary misery inflicted by the student loan industry, whose blatant criminal behavior he condones and extolls. And the Obama regime, via Duncan et al. and his old boy Rahm Emmanuel, are shredding and obliterating public education so that their for-profit testing and charter school buddies can make a killing on the backs of students and teachers whom they despise, and whose futures they are intent on annihilating, for fun and extraordinary profit.
 
 
+7 # Cassandra2012 2014-11-08 17:41
Quoting dquandle:
You think Obama gives a flying f^&k about whether you can pay off your extortionate student loans???

His boy Arne Duncan, who he inserted in the f%$king position is running the Department of "Education" as a siphon, deftly harpooning the arteries of the poor and working class, sucking profit from the extraordinary misery inflicted by the student loan industry, whose blatant criminal behavior he condones and extolls. And the Obama regime, via Duncan et al. and his old boy Rahm Emmanuel, are shredding and obliterating public education so that their for-profit testing and charter school buddies can make a killing on the backs of students and teachers whom they despise, and whose futures they are intent on annihilating, for fun and extraordinary profit.



Rauner , who spent 67 million of his own money is intent on charterschools so as to further undermine the concept of free public education and make his pals rich. He will definitely be the smarmiest governor Illinois has ever had. And his lack of a moral compass is evident in his sordid past. Quinn was no bargain, but in a comparison of 'evil intent' scores far lower than the self-serving vulture cspitalist,and opportunist, Rauner ... .
 
 
+55 # ziply 2014-11-07 13:35
Part 3
In politics, we almost never get what we want, not even close. We almost never find the perfect candidate, the kind of man or woman we can march behind 100% without reservation. And when we think we've found her or him, wait a few years and find out the reality, the human fallibility, behind her or him. Let's face it: what kind of person enjoys the wheeling and dealing, sausage-making, compromise, and power that comes with high office, all that power, all that possibility? The kind of person most of us are not going to be particularly comfortable with, and the kind of person that most of us are not and will never be. Let's face it: money talks. Looking for a critical mass of saints and stateswomen/men is a fool's errand. But this is a nation of one third of a billion people spread across 3 million square miles, with a multi-trillion- dollar economy, the world's most powerful military, the world's largest nuclear weapons arsenal, one of the most productive (i.e., overworked and under-rewarded) workforces, untold trillions in natural resources, the world's largest prison population, thousands of miles of coastline and hundreds of billions of dollars of real estate at risk as sea levels rise, and a multi-trillion- dollar federal tax budget.

You have grown up on and are earning your way on the back of this nation, on my back, on the backs of all of us.
 
 
+26 # Rain17 2014-11-07 15:25
Ziply--I fully agree with Part 3. You say:

"In politics, we almost never get what we want, not even close. We almost never find the perfect candidate, the kind of man or woman we can march behind 100% without reservation. And when we think we've found her or him, wait a few years and find out the reality, the human fallibility, behind her or him."

That is a great point. Here is the other reality. Change doesn't happen immediately or over one or two election cycles. Expecting one or two candidates to change decades of right-wing policies quickly without opposition is just unrealistic.

There was a seminal post on DKos from late 2009 that encapsulates what I think:

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2009/12/16/815429/-No-One-Is-Going-To-Save-You-Fools
 
 
+12 # dquandle 2014-11-07 15:45
Yup, when Obama was elected I got exactly what I didn't want and didn't vote for: a neo-fascist exponent of the plutocracy in the guise of a Liberal token, accepted, protected, and apologized for, by Liberals for all-out eternal war, repression, and massive corporate plunder.
 
 
+6 # Rain17 2014-11-08 13:41
I suspect that there was little Obama could do to satisfy you.
 
 
+4 # Bellwhether 2014-11-09 16:53
So Romney would have been a big improvement?
 
 
+57 # ziply 2014-11-07 13:38
Part 4
It is your responsibility as a citizen to pull your weight, to wade into the sausage vat and help allocate our tax resources to manage this giant socioeconomic machine, help lift our millions of poor people out of poverty, help feed their children, help educate the entire nation's body of children enough that they are not just good cogs in the corporate machine but people who can grasp their place in history. It is your responsibility to keep your shoulder to the wheel even when we're bogged down, on behalf of those weaker than you, because if we don't do it, NOBODY ELSE WILL.

Even if you don't get your way. Even if you have to compromise. Even if you don't like all the arguing. Even if you don't like all the negativity. Even if you don't like the gross corruption, and Citizens United, and the Sixth Circuit's ruling against marriage equality. Even if you don't like being played like the little tiny drum you are by the ad agencies, political advisors, mega-corporatio ns, PACs, deep-pockets billionaires, media outlets, etc., that prey upon our political process.

ESPECIALLY because of all those hurdles.
 
 
+40 # ziply 2014-11-07 13:39
Part 5
Life isn't crafted just for your pleasure. Millions of people in this country and beyond have REAL SKIN IN THE GAME. Millions of Americans are one paycheck away from being on the street, have no wealth to fall back on, no 401K, no suit and tie to wear to an interview.

Or take your ball and go home because you don't have the maturity to see what you're really being offered and what's really at stake, each and every election, and because you cannot look beyond your own concerns to the needs of people who will likely never have the access to resources and wealth you enjoy.

Who needs your brand of sneering parasitism, you and all the others who speak as you do? [NSFW] your "disillusionmen t" and get out of the way of those of us who are willing to shoulder our responsibility as citizens. We will figure out how to make this mess work for us while you sit on the sidelines, taunting us with "Are you listening, you spineless, disorganized compromisers who don't have bold buzzwords that make me happy happy?" No doubt will be one of the first ones in line to help us Little Red Hens eat the bread.
 
 
+112 # Reyn 2014-11-07 14:35
ziply - I don't post often - but you deserve a response that is real. Simply put - The Left only wins with either charisma or populism. the Right light which is what the Dems tried to run as will always fail. If Grimes (who we donated to repeatedly) had stood up for the Kentucky version of Obamacare, wrapped the reality around McConnell's neck and pulled, instead of running from it - he would no longer be a senator. This was true all over. We are NOT well served by cowardice. Populism may or may not win, but it has a lot more chance than this did - and I can honestly say my partner and I not only voted, we donated over a dozen times to various candidates in various amounts. Calling someone selfish because they don't mindlessly vote for someone who gives folk no reason to - wont' cut it.
 
 
+85 # Reyn 2014-11-07 14:37
Let me also note that I believe the Right billionaires realize that the GOP is doomed due to its social policies and aging - and is so set on quietly, oh so quietly taking over the Dems with "social liberals" like Cuomo - who don't have the decency to fund education, care for homeless children or feed hungry families - that disgusts me perhaps more than the naked filth that is the GOP now.
 
 
+34 # CTPatriot 2014-11-07 14:49
Thanks for your astute replies, Reyn. The blindness of party loyalists like Ziply is part of what is killing the Democratic Party. They help to spare the Democrats from self-examinatio n and change, things that can only happen when you admit you made a mistake and work to fix it.

The modern Democratic Party appears to be as dead set on blaming their problems at the polls on everyone but themselves as the Republicans are. Maybe worse.
 
 
+32 # Rain17 2014-11-07 15:46
I'm not "blindly loyal". The Democratic Party clearly has problems. But I have no patience for those who can't be bothered to vote, especially those who know what's at stake.
 
 
+24 # bigkahuna671 2014-11-07 19:42
You're absolutely right, Rain17. This "We can't have our way, so we're not going to participate" fool seems to forget that because he and others of his ilk DIDN'T bother to vote, things will get even worse. I guess that's what they want, things to get worse. If there's any reason why this country is so screwed up, it's because of people who don't think things through. They've so focused on one point or another that they lose sight of the big picture and end up condemning all of us to a country that no longer represents us but represents the 1% and the idiots who vote against their best interests because they 1)oppose abortion; 2)hate illegals; 3)are absolute racists/homopho bes/theocratic bigots; 4)are afraid to lose their "RIGHT" to own any kind of gun they want; or 5)a combination of all of the above. God help us all from these self-righteous children who won't step up unless it's in their best interests, then condemn everyone else who does the same.
 
 
+3 # Jim Young 2014-11-08 09:57
Quoting bigkahuna671:
...I guess that's what they want, things to get worse...


The Republicans are most determined to make things worse as long as they have someone else to blame it on, that's how they follow the CATO Institute's suggestion to use Leninist tactics in the Newt Gingrich/Frank Luntz 1996 GoPac memo, "Language: A Key Mechanism of Control."

After completing the Power Grab (using soft sabotage) they may continue some of scare tactics and suggestions of extreme measures they claim need to be used, but I expect them to follow the plan and actually implement milder forms, even some that might be exactly what their opponents would have done, but only if they can make it sound a little different (AND THEY GET CREDIT FOR IT). That's how I interpret CATO’s aim, the GoPac memo, and the suggestion by a fund raiser that told us "We have to fight dirtier than Democrats." The undocumented encouragement to sabotage all others' efforts until they could get credit for anything good coming from similar (or exactly the same) actions, may not have been as secretive, violent, and deadly as Lenin used, but it was worse than I imagined any Americans doing by this point in our history.

The only appearance of improvement may be the brief respite as they implement milder versions of the things they have scared us most with, actions that we would never have tolerated if they had started out as the most extreme goals professed.
 
 
+5 # bigkahuna671 2014-11-08 10:56
Jim, it's amazing what these GOOD CHRISTIANS and TRUE PATRIOTS will do for money and power, even to the extent that they deliberately kill off thousands of fellow Americans needlessly in the wars they start and destroy the quality of life for millions of other fellow Americans. The GOP - GREEDY OBSTRUCTIONIST PARTY - has stolen not just from Lenin, but from Hitler and Goebbals with the use of 1)the big LIE; 2)creating boogeymen to focus all their followers hatred on; and, 3)repeatedly creating minor issues with which to divide the people so they're never united enough to stop the GREEDY OBSTRUCTIONISTS from stealing everything we ALL have.
 
 
+7 # Rain17 2014-11-08 13:47
One phrase I wish liberals would really stop using is "they are voting against their own interests". I say this because it carries the same negative connotation that the "47%" does on the right. It has the same toxic effect because people aren't going to respond positively to being told they're stupid.

But I agree with you about those not voting. Let's be honest. Many of those who can afford the "things have to get worse before they get better" viewpoint live pretty charmed lives. They can afford the luxury of throwing away their vote because, no matter what happens, they aren't going to suffer the consequences because they are in good jobs with great benefits. They're likely not going to lose their health insurance and are probably in a comfortable place.

As for points 1-5 about those other voters let me add what the real issue is. I work with many conservatives and their worldview simply boils down to:

"I don't want my tax dollars going to undeserving people at my expense. It's not my problem that there are people without good jobs, access to education, and decent healthcare. If they weren't lazy bums, and got a job, they wouldn't be poor. And anyway I shouldn't have to pay for other peoples' stuff".

And until the left figures out a way to reduce the number of people who think like that we are never going to get progressive change in this country.
 
 
+44 # bmiluski 2014-11-07 14:46
I totally agree with you Reyn. I was so disgusted by the stupidity and cowardice of the dems and their mad dash away from President Obama. They deserved to lose.
 
 
-29 # dquandle 2014-11-07 15:19
There should be and indeed was a mad dash away from Obama and his filthy regime. They have demonstrated consistently over the past 6 years that all they are interested in is starting and escalating wars, engaging in mass murder, torturing and offering excuses for torture, and stealing vast amounts of money from US citizens to give to Wall Street, after Wall Street stole even more. All the while, they are going out of their way to shred the constitution and guaranteed civil and human rights, and construct a police state, so that the despicable powers that be can engage in massive repression and intimidation against those who dissent from their staggeringly criminal policies. The congressional "Democrats" have offered exactly the same mix of fear and war mongering and unqualified support for the billionaire parasite class. People should and indeed did avoid them like the appalling plague they are.
 
 
+12 # Jim Rocket 2014-11-07 17:57
" People should and indeed did avoid them like the appalling plague they are" And do what, exactly? Vote Republican? Stay home and not vote at all? How about suggesting some alternatives.
 
 
+45 # Rain17 2014-11-07 15:58
Tell that to the millions of Americans who might lose access to healthcare who only got it through the ACA. Tell it to people who care about environmental issues now that Senator Inhofore will take control of that committee. Tell it to other people.

I am sorry but I have little patience people who, because they didn't get everything they wanted, chose to inflict disastrous consequences on innocent people. And yes those who didn't vote are responsible for this mess.
 
 
+5 # bluebluesdancer 2014-11-07 22:39
Quoting bmiluski:
I totally agree with you Reyn. I was so disgusted by the stupidity and cowardice of the dems and their mad dash away from President Obama. They deserved to lose.


You say that as if 'they' are not connected to 'you'. How many of the people here who are dissing the Dems (and I agree that the message during the run-up to the election was weak)... how many of you actually contacted your representative during the past couple of years to tell them what you wanted, either by direct contact or indirectly via petitions? It's fine and dandy to complain about them not having a strong message, but that is a mistake in hiring their election campaign manager, not the Dems themselves, and part of the problem for any politician is that We the People
seem to assume that once elected our representative will instantly become clairvoyant! *Spoiler alert* They aren't.
 
 
+5 # Rain17 2014-11-07 15:29
Grimes never realistically had any chance to win that race, given the electorate who showed up on Tuesday. I agree that she should have defended KyNect more, but that might have given her maybe 2-3% of the vote. It still would not have propelled her to victory.

In hindsight the DSCC was probably right to initially triage her a month ago. They only returned when pressured to. But I suspect that they saw the trends in the state and that the race was probably out of reach.

Looking at this election cycle the only two Democratic Senate candidates who could have won had they run better campaigns were probably Udall and Braley. Both of them let their races slip from them.
 
 
+20 # pegasus4508 2014-11-07 18:24
Thank you for your message. Populism does get people Engaged and being engaged is what wins races. Allison Grimes needs to give all that wasted money BACK. She had no right to allow Mitch the chinless wonder to blatantly Lie about the ACA. But she was Afraid and fear cost her the senate seat. If they want to be Republicans, then RUN as Republican. If you Want to BE a Democrat, Progressive is the ONLY winning ticket. I do believe every member of the Progressive Caucus was re-elected (to prove my point). Keep voting and giving. Thanks again!
 
 
-3 # Rain17 2014-11-08 13:54
"I do believe every member of the Progressive Caucus was re-elected (to prove my point)."

This is a dishonest argument because almost every member of the Progressive Caucus comes from very liberal districts that are safe for any Democrat. They come from districts where, short of them molesting children or killing someone, they are not in any real electoral jeopardy. If members of the Progressive Caucus were losing en masse then Democrats are having a complete extinction election. Most members of the Progressive Caucus come from very friendly electorates.

As for Grimes, while I agree that she should have defended KyNect more, given the electorate who showed up on Tuesday, she still would have lost. Perhaps had she linked McConnell to KY residents losing their insurance she might have gotten maybe 2-3% more of the vote. But I doubt she would have still won, given the hostile electorate who showed up on Tuesday.

But what also did her in was coal, guns, and Obama. National Democratic Party positions on all three of those issues are very unpopular in KY. Maybe, when Hillary or a Democrat who isn't Obama is President, Democrats might finally win a Senate seat in KY.

However, given the political balance in KY, the type of "progressive" people here want is unlikely to win an election. Maybe an economic progressive could win, but even he/she would have to take moderate to conservative positions on guns and coal to be a viable candidate.
 
 
+21 # Jim Rocket 2014-11-07 14:52
Very eloquent, ziply, but I think your anger is misplaced. "I am sick to death of your kind of shallow, selfish, short-sighted, ignorant extortion. What's in it for you, spoiled little boy? " Just change that to "spoiled old man" and you've described the average Republican voter. That party knows exactly how to motivate their base and mix that with some cheating (voter suppression, gerrymandering) you get victories. Yes, everyone should take democracy as seriously as you do but it won't happen. The Democratic party is a very sick, pathetic, corrupt animal and that's who really deserves your anger.
 
 
+12 # Rain17 2014-11-07 15:45
Ziply--This is another great point and my greatest issue with those who vote third-party. Most of them can afford the luxury of throwing their votes away because they are not going to be suffering the consequences.

It's how I feel about those wealthy celebrities who pushed for Nader in 2000. They could afford the luxury of throwing their votes away on a candidate who had no chance of winning because they were not going to be suffering the negative consequences of Bush's policies that would be inflicted on millions of more vulnerable people.

I think too many people make the perfect the enemy of the good--or the barely good enough. Look at the debate over the ACA. Look at how many people were willing to "kill the bill" because it wasn't single-payer or the public option.

It didn't matter to those people that, however flawed, not passing the ACA would have sentenced millions of Americans to premature, needless death or financial ruination. It didn't matter that not passing the ACA, especially after Clinton failed to reform healthcare in 1993-1994, no President would probably try again for another 16-20 years.

So yes I fully grasp your point. There are many people who don't have the luxury of throwing their votes away or "sending a message".
 
 
+5 # ziply 2014-11-07 13:55
Hmmm... I see that in my zeal (and in trying to break apart my rant into 1500-character pieces), I missed a few punctuation marks, and a phrase or two... Ah well, no Edit button.
 
 
+43 # margpark 2014-11-07 14:15
Goodness, Ziply. I said a day or so ago and will repeat that the Democrats message was simply "Republicans are evil. and Obama who?" I am unaware of any democratic candidate who seemed proud of President Obama or voiced any message about what he or she was going to be doing except of course not be a Republican. Not at all inspiring.
 
 
+19 # suzyskier 2014-11-07 14:21
ziply, well said. You give me hope that there are those who care about what is happening to this country. Most just dump on the President.
 
 
+39 # fynnmckewl 2014-11-07 14:45
I understand the reasoning but don't support the action of not voting. I also agree that most Democratic Candidates let us down. They seemed content with pointing fingers rather than standing for anything. The Republican candidates did promote hatred, prejudice, greed, and dishonesty - everyone, including their supporters knew that - no need to waste time pointing out the obvious - but to their credit, they did take a stand. Most of the democrats never did, they never outlined plans or solutions, they never stood for anything. They left us in the position of choosing what we opposed or choosing the unknown. The GOP won nothing during this election, their victories were handed to them. Greed didn't win, Apathy lost, this battle at least. We have 2 years now to draft our plans for progress, we have 2 years to decide what we stand for and act - No more finger pointing, we can't be shy about what we believe, we have to open our mouths and say it instead - We need to concentrate on the positives rather than putting down the negatives. Rather than the lesser of two evils, we need to be the best of two goods. Let's pull our party together,work together, for a better today and tomorrow, rather than tear ourselves apart condemning each other.
 
 
+27 # Rain17 2014-11-07 15:14
It never ceases to amaze me that the left never learns its lesson about not voting. Did 2000, 2002, 2004, and 2010 not teach them anything about the consequences of not voting--or voting third party?
 
 
+5 # bluebluesdancer 2014-11-07 22:48
I just don;t get this claim that you (and several others) seem to be making, namely that the Democrats don't stand for anything!!! Hello! Have you been away for the past 6 years?!!
I totally agree that the team that decided to whine and whinge at all of us for $3 should be hung-dawn and quartered, but please... they are basically just a loser advertising campaign. If you don't take an interest in politics during the year then don't come complaining that the Dems haven't stood for anything... Good grief!! It is up to US to follow what is going on during the year, and to investigate the things that concern us so that when it is time to vote we already know what each parties strengths and weaknesses are... you can't just wait for the ads to tell you... if you do you might as well get your info from the National Enquirer!!
 
 
+68 # Gooshlem 2014-11-07 14:47
Hey Carl, You should know that those of us left over from the 50s & 60s are still trying to keep things going. Don’t lump us in with FOX old white males (even though i am 78). The person who was in charge of the ballot question on sick leave here on Cape Cod was no spring chicken, was white & male and he worked his butt off. A lot of us are trying our best. There were a lot of democrats working hard for progressive agendas, but not getting very far with the Kochs etc sounding off on TV. It’s hard to fight FOX when kids like you decide to just sit things out when they are not going your way. We are on the same side, but your tactics are counter productive!
 
 
+39 # fredboy 2014-11-07 14:50
This is not just the young voices speaking.

I am 66, and solid with you.

Time for a major change. Or be left in the dust.
 
 
+10 # harbormon 2014-11-07 14:54
Well stated, ziply, and thank you for helping shape the consequences of our recent ballot failures. However, as seemingly one dimensional as Carl's rant might appear, at least we learned something about soundbyte messaging for the Millennials in 2016 that might just help get them off their sofas and cast a vote to address the real issues plaguing our society, which you so clearly enumerated.
 
 
+28 # Rain17 2014-11-07 15:13
I have little patience for people who can't be bothered to vote. I get that the Democrats are not perfect, but elections have consequences. And those who couldn't be bothered to show up are now going to see the consequences of what is about to happen.
 
 
+4 # bluebluesdancer 2014-11-07 22:50
The trouble is, those that didn't vote because "It makes no difference" will use the resulting disaster as a reinforcement of their ideas... because things continue to get worse... *Catch 22*
 
 
+5 # Rain17 2014-11-08 13:55
Yeah indeed. And some people are not patient. They also don't realize that this is a long-term struggle that is more than about one or two candidates or about one or two election cycles.
 
 
+42 # MichaelW 2014-11-07 15:01
Oh,really, Carl? So not voting sends a message? It sure does! It says that you don't give a rat's ass for the growth and development of the America that we "older" voters worked hard to provide for you! I, ans do many of those "older" voters walked door-to-door, passed out literature and made phone calls. What exactly is it that you did? What's that? I can't hear you for your whining. The voters that elected the officials that now will run the country voted the emotional, religious issues you say are important: fairness in the workplace, equality, quality of life, war. Only they voted to keep at war with people because they are different, inequality because of an ignorant religious faith, subservience of women both at home, wor and in healthcare. You have done that. You have allowed that to continue. So, do't give me your crap! Get involved! Get you age group involved! We older voters can't carry you any further. It's your turn! We can only offer to help you. Not do it for you.
 
 
+25 # neohip 2014-11-07 15:02
First Ziply if you had carefully read the article you would have understood that Mr. Gibson did vote. You are truly a case of killing the messenger because you don't like the message. I have followed this young man for a few years now and he is far from being shallow, selfish, short-sighted or ignorant. But he seems to have struck a nerve with you. If we do not pay attention to what he has to say then the Democratic party is doomed. As for your half-chance, at 62 years of age I am sick of choosing the lesser evil. I now understand that our government is the handmaiden to an oligarchy. Student debt is a tremendous problem in this country or why would Senator Warren be so focused on it. In your rant you demonstrated how little you understand what is going on and have fairly swallowed the propaganda. If you have the time you might read up on the numerous other postings Mr. Gibson has contributed and you will find that he is better informed than you pompous ass and hopefully you will offer him the apology he deserves. You want to believe in the two party show still, fine, but don't expect you will get someone in there who isn't completely committed to all war, all the time to benefit the war billionaires; imprisoning a huge percentage of our black male population to benefit the prison industrial complex
 
 
+23 # Rain17 2014-11-07 15:38
"As for your half-chance, at 62 years of age I am sick of choosing the lesser evil."

That is the US electoral system, which is winner-take-all . In countries like Israel, which have proportional systems, if fringe parties get somewhere around 3% of the vote, they can win a seat or two in the Knessett. In the US you either win or lose. And that electoral system is not going to change anytime soon.

Elections are largely about voting AGAINST something than voting for something. It's much easier to get people to vote AGAINST something than to vote for something. Voting is more about stating what you are against than what you support.

And yes I will vote the lesser of two evils every time. I will gladly go into the voting booth and do that because, as sick as some of you may be of me saying this, to the winner goes the cabinet and judicial appointments. And those appointments can have lasting impacts over years and decades.
 
 
+6 # davidr 2014-11-07 22:55
Neohip, you've touched on something that's been bothering me about Carl's article besides its pouting and self-defeating attitude.

He's wrong on the facts. The decline in voter turnout this cycle was just about what it has been in every midterm since 1960, nor is there any evidence that young people abstained from voting at a greater rate than in prior midterms.

Carl tells us that the 2014 candidates were no good, but he doesn't explain why they're always equally no good in every midterm, or why they're always that much better in Presidential years.

In fact, young people did not snub Dems. Exit polling shows that they favored Dems by double digits. This is an about-face from the youth of the '70's & 80's, who voted Repub despite Viet Nam, despite Watergate, and often contrary to the tutelage of their New Dealer elders.

Low midterm turnout is mostly just a rotten habit, possibly due to heroicizing the President. Carl wants to make it a symptom of something awry with the Dems. But just as likely (more likely, in fact) it may be a symptom of something awry with the voters.
 
 
+3 # backwards_cinderella 2014-11-08 05:20
actually the voter turnout for this election was the lowest since 1942. WWII. when most men were overseas & COULD NOT VOTE.
 
 
+3 # davidr 2014-11-08 10:12
Not according to United States Election Project (an organization praised by Sam Wang of the Princeton Election Consortium)

http://www.electproject.org/home/voter-turnout

Here's how they summarize the situation:

"Voter turnout rates presented here show [that] the much-lamented decline in voter participation is an artifact of poor measurement. In the past, turnout rates were calculated by dividing the number of votes by what is called the 'voting-age population,' which consists of everyone age 18 and older residing in the United States (the yellow line to the right [on their website]). This includes persons ineligible to vote -- mainly non-citizens and ineligible felons -- and excludes overseas eligible voters. When turnout rates are calculated for those eligible to vote, or the voting-eligible population, a new pattern of turnout emerges, which exhibits no decline since 1972 (the green line to the right). Indeed, turnout rates appear to have been restored to their earlier high levels as of 2008."
 
 
+21 # Rain17 2014-11-07 15:04
"President Obama hit the nail on the head – we won’t show up and vote for you if you aren’t offering us anything real. If Democrats want to stay relevant, they’ll have to learn to stop taking us for granted and actually make an effort to get our votes. Simply "

Well you are about to find out what the Republicans can--and will do--when they are in charge. I get the fact that some people were disappointed and disillusioned, but that is still no excuse NOT to vote. The other side always comes out and votes, no matter what. That's why they win.

Look at the recent controversy over the Jefferson County, CO school board and their attempt to usher in a right-wing curriculum. There were so many protests. People were shocked that they were implementing such a curriculum.

But I wonder how many parents bothered to vote when that election happened. I wonder how many parents actually looked at the candidate platforms. I would venture to guess that not many did--or not enough to stop that board from taking office.

Here is the bottom line. But change takes more than one or two election cycles. It takes more than supporting one or two candidates. Winning an election is not the end of the struggle. It is only the beginning.

The right was able to gain dominance through decades of hard work. The left just gets discouraged at the first sign of disappointment.
 
 
+20 # Rain17 2014-11-07 15:07
Continued from last post. . .

What you and other young people are about to find out is that elections have consequences. Not voting and staying at home will lead to almost more heinous policies. Even more importantly, although some people here hate this point, the winner gets to make the judicial, cabinet, and regulatory agency appointments; and those people can often make decisions that have lasting implications over decades.

And lastly I will again say there is no excuse not to vote. If you don't vote you lose the right to complain. The other point is that people in many countries overseas have suffered imprisonment, torture, and even death fighting for right that too many Americans take for granted.
 
 
+19 # neohip 2014-11-07 15:08
privatizing public schools to benefit the for-profit-scho ols industry; further deregulating the financial industry; gutting what's left of the EPA; weakening the Clean Air and Clean Water acts; drilling for oil in ANWR -- I could go on and on and on and on and on and on. Ask Professor Cornel West how much President Obama and his DOJ have done for black male prison population. President Obama is droning people, assassinating innocent people. The Democratic Party I was raised on would not stand for this. What do you think the lesser evil means? Yes we the rulers will still be followed and get all we want, it will just involve a pretense of some opposition. Our government has been bought. You Mr. Ziply need to wake up. Both of our parties have betrayed the people and do the bidding of the Corporate Empire.
 
 
+15 # dquandle 2014-11-07 15:23
Yes indeed, two devastatingly criminal right wings of the same grotesque and murderous beast.
 
 
+29 # Benjamin Franklin 2014-11-07 15:35
Simple minded false equivalency. The Dems are indeed craven, bought, and pathetic. But to assert that they are the same as the GOP is to be . . . well . . . simple minded.

A dysfunctional Democratic Party is light years better than the overt corporate fascist extremism that is the GOP.
 
 
+16 # tedrey 2014-11-07 16:31
It's just that it sucks to have to vote for Mussolini when there's no other choice presented but Hitler.
 
 
+1 # neohip 2014-11-07 15:10
Sorry about the punctuation and a phrase or two.
 
 
+12 # neohip 2014-11-07 15:16
Oh and I see another posting claiming President Obama wants another 3.2 billion to fight ISIS. Nobel Peace Prize winner and certainly not benefiting the war billionaires. Mr. Gibson was and is a tireless supporter of the Occupy Movement. Out on the street kind of guy-activist of the highest order. You owe him an apology.
 
 
+42 # MEBrowning 2014-11-07 15:42
Mr. Gibson, I've followed your writing for several years and almost always wholeheartedly agree with you. But in this case, you don't get away with lumping a worthy program like Social Security in with war and suggesting that's what older Americans care about most. Making such sweeping generalizations about an age group is as irresponsible as making statements that are racist, sexist or homophobic. If you don't get that now, you will soon enough, because age happens.

And if many young people voted Republican simply because a candidate was able to get his/her message across in a five-second sound bite, it implies that they don't have the ability to read, think critically, make an effort to study up on the issues, and vote responsibly. Just because the sheep isn't exciting, that's no reason to vote for the wolf.

Yes, the Republicans this year made it crystal clear what they stand for, and they DON'T stand for you or me. Republicans have been compromising our freedom, our health, our earning power and our future for decades. And thanks to people OF ALL AGES who can't think beyond the digestible sound bite and short, memorable message, they're on a roll.
 
 
+1 # Nominae 2014-11-07 22:53
Quoting MEBrowning:
Mr. Gibson...you don't get away with lumping a worthy program like Social Security in with war and suggesting that's what older Americans care about most.....


At age 26, Mr. Gibson has not had a fully wired Adult Judgement Center (Pre-frontal Cortex) for more than four or five years as a Scientific average.

(The pre-frontal cortex is not fully wired in the human female brain "until as late as" age 22, and in the human male brain "until as late as" age 24. Meaning, of course, that it can happen somewhat earlier in both cases, but not a *lot* earlier in either case.)

However bright the young man may be else, he *still* needs time to put some "mileage in the rear view mirror" on that only recently-fully- formed Adult Judgement Center.

The science on brain development is googlable, but those of a "certain age" (I am 66) usually *fully* recall how naively full of shit *we* were in our mid Twenties - even when we might have been otherwise maintaining a 4.0 in College.

Fortunately, MEBrowning, as you observe above, "age happens."

We definitely *need* the starry-eyed and fearless idealism of youth - our own cohort *literally* changed the political landscape for up to 30 yrs. back when all we had was idealism and precious little wisdom.

With a bit of wisdom, however, we might have carried the changes that we wrought to a more long-lasting conclusion than the "Greed Is Good" Reagan Era that followed close upon.
 
 
+11 # bluebluesdancer 2014-11-07 23:08
Hear, hear! Perfectly put!
If the young don't wake up and realize that they have to fight for Soc Sec NOW, in two minutes they will suddenly find themselves old and retired and living under a bridge...
 
 
-1 # Rain17 2014-11-07 15:50
Correcting this post. It belongs somewhere else in this thread.
 
 
+34 # ywsf 2014-11-07 15:52
Excuse me, but older people want to spend money on social security and war? What delusional, ageist world do you live in? Social Security is already paid for out of paycheck. War! You think we want money for war? Grow up and look outside of your cell phone bubble. Raise your head up and look at the world we are in! Seniors want social security NOT to go to privatizationm - so you think seniors voted for the republicans? What a twit.

Democratic Seniors dont want war...we want good schools, we want job for our families and children, we want kids to get out of school and work, and we want student loan debt to go by way of the do do bird.

Democracy is about PARTICIPATION. You failed your nation, your fellow citizens by not voting. whiny babies.

yes the democrats have become spineless. and why not. too few citizens vote, and the ones that always do are the christian coalition and the rush limbaugh zombies.

If democrats would get off their high horse of total selfishness, something might change. but not when people choose to be brats and not vote. we marched and got gassed so you could vote...and look what you've done with that privildge. sat home and whined.
 
 
+3 # bluebluesdancer 2014-11-07 23:09
Yup.
 
 
+31 # Carol R 2014-11-07 15:54
How sad that young Democrats stayed home and didn’t vote. Letting the GOP win an election helps the wealthy and corporations that want to eliminate government restrictions so their profits can soar while not paying workers decent wages and destroying our environment.

I’m a senior (70 years) and also want income inequality to change. Social Security is self-sustaining , at least for a period of time. I fear for our country that spends money on a never ending war and the NSA which sabotages our security.

Democrats should have loudly spoken out about their support for reducing student debt, job creation, ACA, global warming and the real reason for restrictive voter ID laws…keeping students, the ill, seniors and the poor from being able to vote.

Democrats stayed silent on these issues and lost. However, using that as an excuse to stay home and not vote means 99% will suffer. Is that acceptable?
 
 
+15 # George Baggett 2014-11-07 16:01
You gained one supporter in my age bracket - "fredboy" - likely a libertarian or tea-party right winger. Be advised those of us "Baby Boomers" have taken battles in the teeth over and over, fighting for clean air, clean water, civil rights, safe food, health care for all, mass transit and building an infrastructure to leave to your generation. Most of your generation who've been heading to the left were raised by liberal to moderate parents who promoted a number of values including the benefit of a diverse society as well as concerns about student loans becoming a ball and chain.

In my youth, like you I thought I knew everything. It was a great comfort to have mentors and liberal parents who saw this as a growing pain. I feel no need to rant about your article, but will admonish it as being somewhat simple and what one would expect from a generation expecting instant gratification and modern services as an entitlement.
Forty years ago, I might have made a similar warning about being a progressive and for those not interested in the progressive position to just get out of the way. I soon found a passive and brain-washed electorate not so interested in what I thought to be important. You nearly hit it on the head by noting "framing", but be advised the simple minded and short sighted are most impacted by excellent propaganda - the like of which we've seen these past few months. Remember, Winston Smith finally concluded he loved big brother.
 
 
+12 # engelbach 2014-11-07 16:04
Pointing fingers at people who did not vote is not going to change anything. You can't shame enough people into voting to make a difference.

It's up to the party that wants the votes to sell itself, through its policies, actions, and message during election time.

People were not motivated enough by the Democratic candidates or their party.

You can't kick the asses of millions of people to get them to vote, but you can kick the asses of a few hundred politicians to do a better job to deserve the vote and motivate their followers.

The voters are what they are, and you'll just have to accept that. Blaming them accomplishes nothing.
 
 
+1 # bluebluesdancer 2014-11-07 23:26
That is not entirely true. In some countries it is against the law NOT to vote. This results in more people becoming educated about the issues and the candidates. No system is perfect, but the further away we get from things like WWII and Vietnam the less relevant the privilege of voting seems to become to people. The human memory seems to only be able to relate to about 10 years in the past.
 
 
0 # Juliajayne1 2014-11-07 23:48
No need for vulgarity.
 
 
+30 # jayray 2014-11-07 16:08
I am a part of the generation that, though now "old fogies", managed to end the Vietnam War, start the environmental movement, and work for equal rights for people of color and for women. We did it by engaging, not by threatening to hold our breath until we turned blue. Many of us worked our way through college without the aid of Pell Grants and Bright Future scholarships. In my case, I managed to earn one of 12 academic scholarships offered by my junior college, and worked and took out loans for my last two years. After learning that college debt today is about $25,000 I put the amount of my debt into an inflation calculator and found that it would have amounted to $23,000 today. I paid it back--with interest--over several years. I have voted in every election and will continue to do so, but I still believe in the two best cliches about voting: "In a democracy, people get the kind of government they deserve" and, "If you don't vote, don't gripe." Until I read this article, I had real hope for the millenials, but your perspective here leaves me cold. I agree with ywsf that you have failed your nation--and yourselves. One more cliche: "If you are not part of the solution, you are part of the problem." If you really want change, get off your high horse and work for it!
 
 
+14 # Rain17 2014-11-07 16:28
I'm 36, but I have little patience for those who cannot be bothered to vote.
 
 
+3 # dbrize 2014-11-07 21:56
Questions:
Would a vote for a Dem stop the wars?
Change our insane foreign policy?
Curtail Wall Street corporate/banki ng interests?
Stop the NSA extra constitutional spying on law abiding citizens?
Bring the CIA off the books shadow government under civilian control?

I have little patience for lemmings left or right, who can't see through the con job perpetrated by both parties.
 
 
+3 # Nominae 2014-11-07 23:00
Quoting dbrize:
Questions:
Would a vote for a Dem stop the wars?
Change our insane foreign policy?
Curtail Wall Street corporate/banking interests?
Stop the NSA extra constitutional spying on law abiding citizens?
Bring the CIA off the books shadow government under civilian control?

I have little patience for lemmings left or right, who can't see through the con job perpetrated by both parties.


WELL and TRULY SAID ! Thank you so.
 
 
+11 # bluebluesdancer 2014-11-07 23:35
I don't think that any of us who voted Democrat is blind to the problems that you list, but a vote for a Democrat DID give us a starting-point for a more fair medical system, it DID give more equal rights to women and gays and african-america ns, it DID make improvements in education, it DID bring home the thousands of troops that Obama said he would, it DID stop another Depression, it DID make the stock-market and the economy stronger than it has been in years... there is so much that the Dems DID do that you should be ashamed of yourself for speaking like that! Lemmings??? Lemmings??? YOU are the blinkered who "Will not" see that the only thing that Republicans do is make the government bigger, destroy the economy and put us deeper in debt EVERY TIME!! The Democrats know how to make this country better. The Republicans only know how to spend everything and leave the debt for the next guy to clean-up.
 
 
-2 # dbrize 2014-11-08 09:48
If you voted for Dems I you are "blind" to the problems. And complacent about their seriousness. You ought to be reading Carroll Quigley, who not only exposed the sham, but supports it.

Read, study, leave the tribal boundaries behind and you will be enlightened.
 
 
+1 # Rain17 2014-11-09 14:53
And so what is the alternative? To support the Green Party, a party that is unlikely to win any major elections anytime soon.

I am not "blind" to the problems, but I don't live in a fantasy world either.
 
 
0 # NAVYVET 2014-11-09 17:36
Read history, learn from the swift downfall of the Whigs and the swift rise of the Republicans, who were in the 1850s the activists for justice. It has happened, it can happen again. But it can't be named
"Green". The Greens are simply not a viable party.
 
 
0 # dbrize 2014-11-09 18:35
Ballot access folks. Get real, the RebliCrats ain't about to allow any stinking third party on and have any money left to campaign with.

Third parties are the pipe dream of the naive
 
 
-1 # Rain17 2014-11-10 15:38
And that's also why I am not supportive of third parties. I've seen nothing from to Greens to indicate that they are capable of organizing themselves to be an effective political party.
 
 
-3 # dbrize 2014-11-09 21:55
Quoting Rain17:
And so what is the alternative? To support the Green Party, a party that is unlikely to win any major elections anytime soon.

I am not "blind" to the problems, but I don't live in a fantasy world either.

The alternative is not to vote for ANY candidate who does not clearly support the issues you deem essential.

I've listed mine. What are yours?

Are satisfied voting for those who continue the wars, NSA spying on us, corporate cronyism,etc? Go for it. But don't think for one second it makes you morally superior to anyone who refuses to support them.
 
 
0 # Rain17 2014-11-10 15:44
Dbrize, it's so great to be self-righteous about refusing to compromise and not voting for the "lesser of two evils". It's so great to vote third party and/or stay home to demonstrate your purity.

But, when you do vote third-party or stay home, you are voting to take away peoples' civil rights and healthcare. You are voting to inflict pain on lots of innocent people.

It's great that you can afford the luxury of throwing your vote away because the perfect must be the enemy of the good--or the barely good enough--but many Americans can't. And when you are voting third party you are voting to hurt them.

Lastly I'm also gay. I can't afford the luxury of right-wing judges being appointed to take my rights away.
 
 
0 # dbrize 2014-11-10 16:26
Quoting Rain17:
Dbrize, it's so great to be self-righteous about refusing to compromise and not voting for the "lesser of two evils". It's so great to vote third party and/or stay home to demonstrate your purity.

But, when you do vote third-party or stay home, you are voting to take away peoples' civil rights and healthcare. You are voting to inflict pain on lots of innocent people.

It's great that you can afford the luxury of throwing your vote away because the perfect must be the enemy of the good--or the barely good enough--but many Americans can't. And when you are voting third party you are voting to hurt them.

Lastly I'm also gay. I can't afford the luxury of right-wing judges being appointed to take my rights away.


You have made your decision to vote based on your personal value system. I support your right to make your own decisions and advertise them til your hearts content. That I and others see a differing set of issues and choose in effect, none of the above is just as valid a choice as yours. Self rightiousness is merely in the eye of the beholder.
 
 
-1 # Rain17 2014-11-10 23:29
No your decision to vote third and/or not to vote is harming people. Despite all the rationalizing and self-serving statements you are voting to take away healthcare and civil rights from people.
 
 
-1 # dbrize 2014-11-11 09:16
Quoting Rain17:
No your decision to vote third and/or not to vote is harming people. Despite all the rationalizing and self-serving statements you are voting to take away healthcare and civil rights from people.


So, by your rationalization the only legitimate vote would be one that agrees with yours.

How charmingly democratic of you.
 
 
+16 # Floe 2014-11-07 16:08
Everything is broken. Everything is twisted. This was pretty obvious at least three years ago, actually it was slapping us in the face then. Obama passed the NDAA behind our backs so he can do things but he didn't cancel the XL pipeline. Hmm. The fact that he drones families and continued the Bush tax cuts without a good bargain, you'd think those were huge red flags. Seems like we had to have the pain.
 
 
-2 # tonywicher 2014-11-07 20:03
This young man is right in saying that young people are not getting to the polls because Democrats are not providing any candidates worth voting for. It's time for a Thanksgiving massacre! The entire Obama administration is worse than a dismal failure. Out with the National Security and Wall Street Democrats! Out with the Four Witches of Humanitarian Bombing, Victoria Nuland, Samantha Power, Valerie Jarrett and Susan Rice! Out with Skull and Bones Kerry! In with real Democrats and real progressives! Really investigate 9/11, find out what really happened! In with a team that will push for Glass-Steagall, a Wall Street sales tax, massive infrastructure development and a foreign policy of co-operation and respect for international law. This is our country's last chance! How about it, Democrats?

http://larouchepac.com/20141106/larouche-demands-thanksgiving-massacre-purge-obama-white-house
 
 
0 # speedboy 2014-11-07 16:38
Since he's from Wisconsin, I would much rather he tell us why milk is almost $4 per gallon.
 
 
+15 # Vardoz 2014-11-07 17:20
Shame on all the Americans who could have voted for a Progressive Democrat!!! More people show up for the Super Bowl!!! Now we have the anti- Democracy, Anti Government Grover Norquist clones- a minority of old white guys working for the 1% in charge!!!!! They are putting Inhofe, the climate change denier in as head of the energy committee just as catastrophic Climate Change is baring down on us. They are already blackmailing Obama threatening him if he exercises his right to make executive orders. Shame on all those who let these bastards get in!!!!! Now these guys will hand over everything to the corporations via the TPP our rights, laws, with no protections- everything handed over to them on a silver platter- Why not give the Progressives a chance? Didn't Obama make more money available for student loans? Didn't he make it possible for students to only pay back 10% of their income!!!!! Didn't he get blocked by a GOP over and over whose only agenda was to take over at all costs to everything- The majority will really regret not showing up. Have the GOP demonstrated even once that they give a damn about the majority? Remember the Mitt video! Progressives CARE ABOUT PEOPLE CORPORATIONS DON'T
 
 
+16 # jJLLA 2014-11-07 18:19
PArt II

Here’s my take: for the last six years, I’ve heard the old “Both parties are the same” argument. I have parried that, no, they are not. But yesterday I had to come to a conclusion that they are the same – but not in the way you might think. The new Tea Party conservatives are a hard nosed bunch, who see the world in black and white terms. Everything is some sort of “moral” issue, were the outcome must have “winners” and “losers”. No compromise. No hearing what the other side has to say – because they are morally wrong and should not even be given a place at the table. They want everything their way. Period.
The progressives are the same way: they want their candidates to meet EVERY SINGLE criteria they find important, and if the candidate doesn’t, they refuse to vote for him/her. They won’t even consider that the candidate may agree with them on 80% of the issues: if the candidate isn’t 100% behind EVRYTHING the progressive wants – then too bad. No support. Many of my progressive friends deliberately staed home Tuesday. And they had very supercilious, self righteous reasons for doing so: the Democrats didn’t back EVERYTHING they wanted.

It’s this kind of “my way or the highway” that will bring the nation to its knees.
 
 
+10 # Jim Rocket 2014-11-07 18:50
Good post. Considering how much effort they expend to prevent people from voting, not voting really is a vote for the Republicans.
 
 
-8 # tonywicher 2014-11-07 20:09
Obama is a fake progressive who caved into the Republicans at every turn. His administration is a total failure. But there is hope. Democrats still have two years to turn the party and the country around. But not if you go on justifying an administration that has been as bad or worse than the previous one.
 
 
+16 # Proud progressive 2014-11-07 17:22
Oh quit your moaning....do you REALLY think the GOP will or would ever deal better than democrats with ANY of the issues you are so concerned about? No one is taking you for granted.....the y just expect you to use some common sense!

Now by staying home and not voting, we will get to see just how that works out for you. But don't come crying to anyone because all those issues go to hell in the next two years. Because YOU stayed home, in effect, YOU voted for whatever happens.

Here's a little hint for you all, until you become a dependable voting block for the issues you claim to care about, no one is going to really do more than pay lip service to you and your issues. Unless you VOTE you will never be relevant to ANY party.
 
 
0 # NAVYVET 2014-11-09 17:32
The writer DID vote! I hope you did.
 
 
+11 # DaveHOz 2014-11-07 17:25
I want to inspire young people to get politically involved as much as anyone else... But I don't think the way to do that is going to be to tell them they're all a bunch of spoiled brats. They get enough name-calling from their classmates. And we know a Republican has a euphoric high every time they see progressives fighting amongst themselves and pointing fingers. The big lesson, I think, from this election was that progressives/po pulists have *got* to work to wrestle the Democratic Party back from the DLC and Blue Dogs. Their strategy of "Woo the big money donors, and forget about the progressives 'cause they have nowhere else to go!" obviously won't work anymore.
 
 
-1 # tedrey 2014-11-07 17:27
Interesting. There seems to be more vitriol in this opinion thread than I'm used to seeing this far left of Fox. Whether it's the election or the full moon I think some of you, temporarily I hope, are out of kilter. Maybe it's just me, but I think I'll wait until we remember how to discuss these important affairs more coherently and less vindictively
 
 
+5 # janla 2014-11-08 19:27
Quoting tedrey:
Interesting. There seems to be more vitriol in this opinion thread than I'm used to seeing this far left of Fox. Whether it's the election or the full moon I think some of you, temporarily I hope, are out of kilter. Maybe it's just me, but I think I'll wait until we remember how to discuss these important affairs more coherently and less vindictively

You think this discussion is at all comparable to the vitriol and name-calling on right wing sites? Seriously?
 
 
+23 # jJLLA 2014-11-07 18:18
I have been laid off various times over the last ten years and am now attending college in order to change careers. NOT ONE young person I spoke with at college on Wednesday voted. And their attitudes are not what this author claims regarding a more populist agenda. Most of the kids were too busy or too wrapped up in social stuff to even recall that Tuesday was Election Day. Only a few admitted that they were even registered to vote!!! So while I agree that the Democrats need to get more progressive in their platform to attract young folks, the younger generation deserves a bit of the blame for Tuesday’s outcome.
 
 
0 # NAVYVET 2014-11-09 17:31
Do you live in one of the MANY states where college students who live on campus have been disenfranchised ? Maybe that's why they didn't even try.
 
 
+18 # Helen Marshall 2014-11-07 19:02
Hey, too many generalizations here..I am 70 and yes I want Social Security to be protected but I'm not a supporter of any of our wars!! Nor do I watch Fox! We have to have generational unity if we are going to get the US out of the hole it is in now.
 
 
+12 # capecodcathy 2014-11-07 19:40
I must agree with Mr. Gibson. I'm in my 50's but have become more progressive as I've aged. In my younger years, when my children were in elementary school, my town needed two new schools. Both schools were shot down at Town Meeting by the elderly, retired residents concerned, rightfully so, about their tax burden on fixed incomes. Other than the few of us parents who were involved, parents didn't show up to Town Meeting until we were able to mobilize them and also meet some very basic needs, such as free babysitting during Town Meeting. It took a few years, but we got two new schools. If you want the people to show up, you have to motivate them. You have to remove roadblocks. You have to key in on what's important to them and then give them a reason to show up.
 
 
-16 # tonywicher 2014-11-07 19:48
Time for a Thanksgiving massacre! The entire Obama administration is worse than a dismal failure. Out with the National Security and Wall Street Democrats! Out with the Four Witches of Humanitarian Bombing, Victoria Nuland, Samantha Power, Valerie Jarrett and Susan Rice! Out with Skull and Bones Kerry! In with real Democrats and real progressives! In with a team that will push for Glass-Steagall, a Wall Street sales tax, massive infrastructure development and a foreign policy of co-operation and respect for international law. This is our country's last chance! How about it, Democrats?

http://larouchepac.com/20141106/larouche-demands-thanksgiving-massacre-purge-obama-white-house
 
 
+20 # Shari 2014-11-07 19:50
I take personal offense to this open letter to Democrats. Firstly, How dare you!!! because not ALL baby boomers are war hawks. Those would be your Republican baby boomers!!!!! I am indeed a baby boomer. Better known as a hippie in my younger days. Which also means, I've protested every single war since Viet Nam. By protesting I don't mean tweeting my displeaure with it. . . or writing a blog about it either. I mean marching in protests, getting hit with police batons. In 2003 I marched with millions of others worldwide against the invasion of Iraq. I also protested during the civil rights movement and got sprayed with water hoses and had tear gas canisters thrown and rubber bullets shot at me. I put my life on the line for a cause I was comitted to, and I still do today. I also was part of OWS. Were you? Did you notice that there were a ton of baby boomers supporting OWS? Ok, got that off my chest. I do understand your disillusionment , but to lump all people in one category is beyond riduculous. You Millennials have many more allies than you could ever imagine in us Baby Boomers, as we are many, and not all are Republicans. But, in the end like the old saying goes: Didn't vote? Then don't complain.
 
 
-6 # tonywicher 2014-11-07 20:27
I demonstrated against the Vietnam War right along side you. But what has Obama given us? The overthrow of the government of Libya, the murder of Ghaddafi, the arming of thugs called "freedom fighters" to overthrow the legitimate government of Syria, a policy which has now created ISIS, which we are supposedly fighting but which is really our policy instrument to finish overthrowing Assad - then on to Iran - in other words, a policy that that is identical to the one being followed in the Vietnam War. Johnson resigned rather than run for the Democratic nomination in 1968. Obama should resign now. It would be the honorable thing to do and best for the country and the party. Perhaps some senior Democrats could tell him this, and we could bring in some competent adult leadership for the next two years.
 
 
+7 # Ken Halt 2014-11-07 20:53
Just a little reality check from another baby boomer who would like to see the US gov, now dominated by corporations, work for We The People, (i.e., another aging hippie). Johnson did not resign he simply did not run for another term, so Obama, following his example, shouldn't run for another term, which the 22nd amendment to the US Constitution forbids. If voters had carefully vetted Obama before the 2006 election, they would have known that, if actions speak louder than words, he was to the right of corporatist Hillary. There are a few pols at the nat'l level who are fighting for the common man. It will be a long hard slog but if we support them and add to their numbers, we can once again have a functioning republic.
 
 
-7 # tonywicher 2014-11-08 11:49
OK, you are right, Johnson didn't resign, he just didn't run. But my point is unchanged: Obama should resign right now along with his whole administration, which has been a dismal failure and has discredited the Democratic party. Face it, Republicans won because Democrats have abandoned their core principles. They answer to Wall Street and the CIA as much as the Republicans. We need real, senior, New Deal, anti-Wall Street, antiwar Democrats to take the helm of the party and the government. We have two years. Bill Clinton, where are you? You once had some of the characteristics of a real Democrat. Now is your chance!
 
 
+4 # janla 2014-11-08 19:31
Quoting tonywicher:
OK, you are right, Johnson didn't resign, he just didn't run. But my point is unchanged: Obama should resign right now along with his whole administration, which has been a dismal failure and has discredited the Democratic party. Face it, Republicans won because Democrats have abandoned their core principles. They answer to Wall Street and the CIA as much as the Republicans. We need real, senior, New Deal, anti-Wall Street, antiwar Democrats to take the helm of the party and the government. We have two years. Bill Clinton, where are you? You once had some of the characteristics of a real Democrat. Now is your chance!

What nonsense- to ask someone to resign because you don't like him! I didn't like Bush Jr. for most of his administrations policies, for lying us into a 12 year war, for being so inept and so dominated by others; he didn't resign even when I asked him nicely in a letter.
 
 
+22 # Sai 2014-11-07 21:07
Carl Gibson, you were doing okay until you said "Older voters want their money spent on Social Security and war". No, older voters DON'T WANT THEIR money spent on Social Security. They simply want their MONEY RETURNED to them. As you may be aware, they paid through their noses all their working lives. It is NOT an entitlement. Even the warmongering is NOT supported by a majority of the older voters. It is the dirty politicians (who are in the pocket books of bankers and military industrial complex) who go for perpetual wars. I wish you talked more objectively.
 
 
+11 # chandler77 2014-11-07 21:40
this is what happens when we stop teaching Civics in schools and get rid of the draft. Whiny, entitled Millennials complain we aren't entertaining enough for them to come out and vote. Boo F*ckn Hoo. Set your priorities and vote accordingly. If your issues are not being addressed, show up and GET them addressed. Otherwise, don't complain when you have to pay more taxes/interest/ time for the price of staying home. Not voting is EXPENSIVE.
 
 
+5 # SenorN 2014-11-07 23:05
I agree with much of what you said, Carl. Democrats need to be more openly populist and need to brag about the ACA instead of running away from it. However, you wrote, "you just pointed the finger at the other guy, told us they were bad." Now THAT sounds like what the Repuglicans did.

I would suggest that when the grownups tell you the Repuglicans are bad, you LISTEN! And get your friends to vote, before it's too late...
 
 
+3 # LizBot 2014-11-08 01:57
Alright, I was with you for the first paragraph, I really was. I love the line about getting populist or getting out.

However, as a millenial who is not blinded by the party lines of the Republicrats, I find the rest of your article ridiculously overrun by what conservatives would term "liberal propaganda".

The reality is there is no such thing as all or nothing. I live in a red state that historically elects a Democrat for governor, several Unicameral seats, and utility board seats. We raised our minimum wage, but we also put a homophobic religious jerk in the Senate. We do these things because we are moderate conservatives. If the left and the right became centrist again, many people across the country would be trilled because *we need compromise*.

I joined the US Uncut FB page because I believe corporate tax loopholes and offshore tax evasion need to be stopped, but I am an independent voter who bailed on both traditional parties to be a socially conscious libertarian. I recycle and tend to an organic garden, I believe in abortion rights and the right for anyone to be married. I also believe more government is more wasteful government and more corrupt government. I support 2nd Amendment rights -- and I think religion has no place in the US government. I believe in not oppressing anyone with the beliefs of others, and like others, I am tired of this contentious party prattle. Be an American, demand cooperation for everyone's sake.
 
 
+1 # Orenda 2014-11-08 02:07
I am one of the boomers who did not vote for either Democrat or Republican unless that was the only choice I had. Rather, I tend to vote "no party" where available, BUT I have to know who I'm voting for before I make such a choice. I do not like either party and I firmly believe that the political party system should be abolished. Why? Because a candidate should stand on his/her convictions, not a party line. We divide our country by gender, race, rich vs poor, etc. Why divide us further by political parties, too? The issues of the young are just as important to them as the issues of us older folk. Those who are coming behind us need free college educations (there are state colleges just like there are public schools, why should they pay for their education when they go to a state-run college?) and they should get higher wages. However, minimum wage should be reserved for part-time high school students who are getting their resumes started; minimum wage does not belong among the working force. A living wage is what this country needs for people with families including single parents as well as college graduate professionals. As a disabled veteran, I disagree that we old farts are warmongers. But I do believe Social Security needs an overhaul. If ever we could get people in office that cared about us from the cradle to the grave, we'd have a much more balanced system.
 
 
+3 # Dean2030 2014-11-09 19:19
You make a lot of sense, Orenda, but the ONLY way the country can make those changes is for its citizens to VOTE, VOTE, VOTE. To not vote is just stupidity beyond words.
 
 
+8 # reo100 2014-11-08 04:13
Be that as it may, I think the Republicans stole the elections with gerrymandering and disinfranchisin g. Count the provisional ballots! All of them! Afterall, let's look at the half a million people in Georgia who were disenfranchised ?
 
 
+8 # janetburnett 2014-11-08 06:43
I never forget that I too was born a baby and went through stages of growth to get to my age. As a young person I was passionate. I still am. But I am more realistic. Instead of the "Pinky & the Brain" complex in wanting to change the world, let's take a deep breath and open the conversationh.

To not vote is to shoot oneself in the foot. One will surely die slowly from the bleeding. The reality is that while we work for a more perfect union, we are only one country in a world that doesn't think we are all that. Sometimes the choice is the best of the bad choices. Where are people during primaries? I get cussed at and insulted when I try to talk to folk, particularly young folk, about what is at stake.

So now we have republican House and Senate. Keep looking for great change that will be better for young people. You will find your thoughts might shift a bit.
 
 
+14 # nyambol 2014-11-08 07:32
Wrong on so many levels, where to begin?

Voting is a duty and responsibility of citizens. "I didn't vote" is the statement of an irresponsible citizen. All the excuse-making about the nature of and quality of the candidates matters not one whit. The so-called millenials don't vote because they're immature and irresponsible. They expect the political parties to /cater/ to them.

And for those who did vote -- great. Were you at the town committee meetings? Did you walk the precinct? Were you at the "town hall" meetings of the candidates and elected officials? No, of course not. You expect the political parties to poll you and ask you what you want and then give it to you! Mary, mother of Jesus, give me patience.

Contrary to the beliefs of the irresponsible youth, candidates don't just pop up like weeds from nowhere. They are people who have spent years toiling in the background of the party infrastructure. They work the committees, they are on school boards, city commissions, neighborhood associations. They get onto ballots because they are known to the people who decide who gets on the ballot.

If you want to change the way politics is done -- if -- get off the couch, shut your whine hole and start doing the dirty work that needs to be done.
 
 
+1 # Dean2030 2014-11-09 19:14
Indeed!
 
 
-1 # mediasavvy 2014-11-08 07:52
This election was a referendum on the REFUSAL of the Democratic Party to deal honestly with the devastation of the economic crash and its causes.

They started by saving the banks and Wall St, the people who crashed the economy. They even put some of them in power.

Then they saved the auto industry, the health care insurance and drug industries, the warmongers and their never ending wars, the national (in)security state and worked their way down to 'investor' reform and stopped, LEAVING EVERYONE IN ECONOMIC DANGER TO DROWN IN THE WORST ECONOMIC CLIMATE SINCE THE GREAT DEPRESSION.

For 6 years, they have tried to bamboozle us that the economy was improving. Meanwhile, while the job market continues to disintegrate and remains dead at the base of society.

We need a WPA-style jobs program, followed by a Marshall plan for America's thousands of dying towns and cities. We need STUDENT DEBT FORGIVENESS, not Warren's 'improved' loan rate.

We need LIVING WAGES, not minimum wages.

We hate their wars and their fascist, national security ambitions.

Democrats need to abandon Clinton/Obama free trade, pro-corporate, Goldman Sachs policies, or we will continue to abandon and betray them.

And the last thing we want to see is Broomhilda the Warmonger, coming like the death star to blot out the sun for everyone but herself and her corporate pimp of a husband.
 
 
0 # NAVYVET 2014-11-09 17:27
Good for you!!!
 
 
+4 # manfromnc 2014-11-08 09:21
Young people are very impatient. I am a boomer, and I was too when young. The sad thing I see is that a majority the young, independent, anti-war boomers have turned into selfish, conservative war-hawks. The young (millennials, X-generation, etc.) need to get involved and not just at election time. All the time. Bug your local, state, and federal officeholders your priorities that you want to change. Then at election time VOTE. There is no candidate that is completely 100%"worthy" of your vote. But what you have to do is vote for the one that is as close to your beliefs as possible. Then when they get in office make sure they stand up to their promises by staying in contact with them. This doesn't have to be daily or weekly. But, regularly. Follow them on Facebook and Twitter and other social media. You will see change if you follow this process. It just takes time. I am a dyed-in-the-woo l Progressive. So I am sooo frustrated after mid terms (at the local, state and federal levels). But, we have to prepare for the next round. Remember, there are other important issues than legal marijuana and student loan debt (I support both). There are Human Rights and Voting rights that are being eroded as we speak. Right now you are not concerned about SS and Medicare. But, believe me, you will get old and these WILL become important to you. Quit looking just inside of your own bubble and see the big picture, and as I said before get involved and VOTE!!!
 
 
+2 # Rain17 2014-11-08 13:59
The other point is that change takes more than one or two election cycles. It is about more than one or two candidates.
 
 
+5 # SiaraDelyn 2014-11-08 09:35
Why did you do this to yourselves. We 60's people fought for civil rights rather than not voting. You made a different choice. It's on you now.
 
 
+4 # SiaraDelyn 2014-11-08 10:00
You don't seem to get the fact that older people are much more insulated from the government. We own property and have international investments, retirement accounts, etc. Our families are grown. My children currently live in Canada and are not affected by cuts in education, etc.

Young people are the ones who are starting careers and families and don't have as much control over their lives. The young people who chose not to vote need to realize they aren't kids. You have chosen to lose your freedom in favor of a temper tantrum. You are [were] in charge of your own lives and the childhoods of the next generation.
 
 
+6 # Eddie G/East Coast 2014-11-08 10:26
Because there is a huge surplus of idiots in the 'Greatest Country in the World,' we will never recover from the now complete takeover by greedy oligarchs. It doesn't matter who votes, young or old, etc. The choice of candidates is nil. The people who are duped by anti-science, anti-secular ersatz 'religious' buffoons, corporate shills and those who are just plain racists, are legion. The takeover is complete. The Kochs and Karl Roves have won. Final step will be some rich, white asshole (like Newt Romney) ascending the throne in 2016. France has 5 week vacations, Germany has free education, virtually every other civilized country has health care.
We are 27th in health care (worldwide) and 17th in education (worldwide) and our kids become indentured servants to their crappy education. And you wanna argue about the voting process? Go USA!
 
 
+3 # kyzipster 2014-11-08 10:58
Well said but the bottom line is, younger voters did not turn up to vote. They need to stop blaming the Baby Boomers for all of their problems and get off their butts. Roughly half the country voted against Republicans in the Reagan years, not much has changed, we're all victims of the conservative movement. Millions of we Baby Boomers have lived through decades with the same frustrations you're experiencing today but I always vote, without fail.

The sorry state of the Democratic Party is no excuse, people can always vote for a write-in candidate to make a point.
 
 
+1 # Edwina 2014-11-08 11:28
One of the reasons we could vote for a third party candidate in California is not that we are rich and famous, but that we had third parties that represented us -- our interests and ideals. Peace & Freedom, Green. There are always issues to vote for in any election. Chevron vs. the City of Richmond, for example. The attempt to roll back prevailing wage laws in 3 other cities. But while we've been voting for the lesser of 2 evils, the political environment has gotten steadily worse. I say refuse to vote for Democrats that have not defended the rights or interests of ordinary citizens -- corporate Democrats, security-state Democrats. Organize to build an alternative.
 
 
+1 # Rain17 2014-11-08 14:00
I'm sorry, but I am not going to waste my vote on candidates who have no chance of winning. There are people who stand to lose their health insurance. There are others' civil rights who are at stake. Voting third party inflicts negative consequences on vulnerable people, given the nature of the US electoral system.
 
 
+3 # Shlarg 2014-11-08 11:31
The bottom line is the republicans got elected. I guess that's okay with you Carl because you're "disillusioned" You think you're disillusioned now ? Just wait 'till you have to live with the consequences of your decision not to vote. Old age is right around the corner. When the republicans dismantle every program that makes this a decent country to live inn you can say, "Well...I was disillusioned."
I do agree with your premise that we need to be more populous and we (the democratic party) made a huge mistake in trying to go republican-lite .
 
 
-2 # Rain17 2014-11-09 14:35
Shlarg, the reality is that Carl probably isn't going to suffer that much. He can afford the luxury of throwing his vote away and attacking the Democrats because, even when the GOP takes office, he's probably not going to suffer.
 
 
+4 # politicfix 2014-11-08 11:46
The Democrats were gutless. They needed to rally behind the President and tout what he has able to get done with a Congress that was totally uncooperative, didn't earn their paychecks at all by say "NO" to everything therefore disenfranchisin g the people and the country, and further kept threatening to shutdown the Government unless they got their way. The President got healthcare, he got Pre-existing conditions put aside. He got Bin Laden. He did a few things with his hands handcuffed by the Republicans. You can't tell me that Republicans didn't benefit from the elimination of pre-existing conditions. That is a success coming from someone who was faced with that horrible stigma. I'm ashamed that the Democrats didn't allow Obama to campaign for them. These were your card and you didn't even play them, you tried to waffle around with the Republicans cards, and you lost completely. It was just plain STUPID. And....Allison Grimes not saying she voted for the President was the biggest mistake of her campaign. NO GUTS NO GLORY! They left successes of the President lying on the basement floor. There is no left to the Democratic party anymore. Dems think they have to run center right which makes the Republicans go crazy far right. You never win playing someone else's game. It's time the Democrats quit trying to play defense with the Republicans game and play their own cards as they were dealt. The Dems learned nothing from 2008. Get a grip, and quit trying to be FAUX Republicans.
 
 
0 # Rain17 2014-11-08 14:01
Grimes would have lost that race no matter what she did, given the electorate who showed up on Tuesday. Perhaps defending the ACA would have netted her maybe 2-3% of the vote, but not much more. She ran a bad campaign; but, looking at the returns, this was probably a hopeless race from the beginning.
 
 
0 # The Buffalo Guy 2014-11-08 13:25
What is now known as Obamacare is a good example of the Conservative's side ability to destroy public support for an major issue. They continually hammered Obamacare and there was little Democratic response to it. It seems the Conservatives even had people who benefited complaining, some in my extended family. Is it that difficult to explain the plan? Admittedly, I never took the time because answers seemed to be there only for those signing up and I didn't need to.
 
 
+8 # Rain17 2014-11-08 14:18
I've said it a million times here in threads about healthcare; but the biggest obstacle to the public option, let alone single-payer, is that you have too many Americans who believe that:

1. It's not my fault that there are uninsured people.

2. Most of them are lazy bums on welfare anyway who, if they only got a job and didn't waste their money on fancy cell phones, laptops, and Cable TV, could easily afford healthcare.

3. They can go to the emergency room, where they don't to pay. Medicaid, welfare, SSDI, and other programs have generous benefits that will cover them.

4. There will be a government takeover of healthcare.

5. I'll lose the right to pick my own doctor!

6. Illegals will get free healthcare!

7. The quality of my care will suffer.

8. I'll have to wait three years to get that knee replacement and six months to get an appointment!

9. Bureaucrats will go out of their way to come between me and my doctor and make medical decisions.

10. There will be healthcare rationing!

11. I'll have to report to some scary looking government building filled with hostile bureaucrats.

12. Single-payer will enable and reward the pathological and irresponsible choices of those on welfare!

In sum you have too many people whose worldview is: "I don't want to pay for other peoples' stuff". And until those opinions significantly anything more than the ACA is a political nonstarter.
 
 
+3 # teodell_70 2014-11-09 21:44
I agree. To me the biggest obsticle to starting to change peoples mind is the contrast between the way GOP and DNCC talk about ACA. GOP, as always, will present detailed ( ofter wrong ) reasons and discussion points where Dems tend to return a weak "No that's not the case" type of defense. In spite of how wrong many ideas are floating around out there people tend to want organizied details and a passionate presentation versus a better solution but one you have to read through apoligist explaination to see the big picture.
Removing those blocks those will be the long haul change that has been called out repeatedly where we aren't going to suddenly find that everyone sees how incorrect those statements are.
 
 
+2 # NAVYVET 2014-11-09 16:20
Too bad your state or city doesn't have an agency like ours, that neutrally helps us find the cheapest and most effective health plans. I too am very much dedicated to single payer--but first we gotta get the dum-dums out, and some of these fine young people IN.
 
 
+3 # Henry 2014-11-08 15:42
Just a wee note to Mr. Gibson: "Military and defense" need not always equal WAR, so to say old people favor war is not quite right. Also, the poll by University of Texas was probably taken IN Texas, land of idiots, apart from a couple of towns.
 
 
+13 # SeamusBerkeley 2014-11-08 17:10
@uncutCG Silence is consent.

I'm in that very block of voters who showed up at the polls in large numbers. Unlike the majority of this group, I support every issue that is important to you. And, I voted. Why? Because not voting allowed those most opposed to these issues into power. As you pointed out, when your block voted, you won!

While you can tell me that your age group didn't vote because no candidate spoke out on your behalf, their silence just allowed those who did indeed speak out against your issues get elected. Make no mistake, Republicans have been vocal in speaking out against you and what is important. So, their silence has indeed consented to elect those who oppose you the most.

I'll be honest: when I ask friends of mine in your age group if they are going to vote and I hear 'no' or 'not this time' or 'it doesn't affect me' or 'that's scarcity thinking' or any other reason for not voting, I want to explode. That thinking has just elected the absolute worst set of officials in my lifetime.

Please, we need you to vote in every election, not just when you feel someone is vocal about your issues. Not voting just encourages the 'good old white boy network' to forge ahead with pushing for policies which the majority of people in this country disagree.

Vote. Every. Time. Period. Your vote matters!
 
 
+2 # HomaSapiens 2014-11-08 19:08
Evidently, some people figure that because the democrats do not show themselves 100% behind their pet issues, you would rather vote for republicans who have 100% offered the bird for pet issues.

I am SO glad that not all millenials think in this simplistic way.
 
 
+6 # ahollman 2014-11-09 13:01
Dear Carl,
Noting that far more older people voted than younger people, you asked, "So how do older people pick who runs Congress?"

First: they vote, and you don't. Unlike 50 years ago, when people fought and died to get the right to vote, you have it. Even the worst of Republican tactics to prevent you from voting - voter id, limited hours - pale in comparison. You *choose* not to vote, so you don't get much sympathy.

Just remember, you'll get older, and hopefully you'll get smarter.

Older people actually are on young peoples' sides on the issues that concern younger people. They too once had student loans (some still do). They probably fought for civil and abortion rights (some still do).

Older people use the system when it works, go beyond it when it doesn't, try to change it to make it work. All you can do is complain.

Older people treat voting as a right that needs to be exercised for democracy to work. You treat it as a consumer choice, where "none of the above" is a reasonable choice. It isn't.

Older people can also interact with and organize with other people without cellphones and tweeting. It takes more time, but is less subject to instant (and usually minimally thoughtful) reaction. The world is not instant, neither are results.

Try meeting people, not tweeting people. It works wonders.

Voting is the least you do. By opting out, you become part of the problem. Grow up.
 
 
+4 # NAVYVET 2014-11-09 16:15
Good for you, Carl Gibson--and shame on those who don't understand what you hope for--and fear! I'm 78, probably the oldest person who attended my city's Democratic Socialists of America annual convention last month. In my estimate, 85% of the attendees were under 35--and about half looked to be college/high school age. Hurrah for them! I know they VOTED, if only for serious ballot issues. They were, still are, campaigning against the primitive US laws that permit the rich to get richer and ruin the poor--like our horrible bankruptcy and student debt laws, tax breaks to the filthy polluting rich, burgeoning debtors' prisons, war profiteering, charter school mania, etc. The young people in my church, most of them Dems or Indy, are just as committed. Most of the young folk I know aren't apathetic, but are passionately caring people who detest endless war, growing poverty, stupid health care, job losses, the destruction of environment and the huge numbers of attacks on people of color, including immigrants. Even so, the issues that inspire them MUST be ones that matter personally to their lives! Did you despise the young folks in the late 60s for wanting us out of Vietnam? They inspired me (10 to 12 years older) to resign from the Navy and dedicate myself to environmentalis m as a career. If we old folks can't understand, we should shut up and let them take the reins. Young people are the world's only hope.
 
 
+2 # Bellwhether 2014-11-09 16:57
Great idea. You Hitlerjungen keep standing around admiring the Republicans for their efficiency and waiting for someone to hand you what you demand instead of getting out there and working towards it, like we all have to do in a nation of 331 million people. The Dems, with all their faults, are your best shot for change for the moment. All you've done is help the fascists take more control.
 
 
+1 # @atibamanii123 2014-11-09 17:29
Posted on my twitter account:
@uncutcg Your Open Letter to Dems http://tinyurl.com/kwuvyw8
hit a cord with me & I am RT it here for @TheDemocrats. Also want 2 let u know that I’m one of your grandparents that did not vote 4 the same reasons as u. I came from a family that has voted straight Dem for 100s of years & quit in disgust in 2004 after working my butt off for the Kucinich campaign, the only person talking peace in either party then and since. Want 2 know where Kucinich is now? Google it. I realized the sad & sickening corporate strong hold on the party and fled for my, and my grandchildren’s , lives. I registered Green, but the 2 corp parties have such a stranglehold on PA that Greens can’t even get on the ballot, so I had no one to vote for. Last election I took a pencil into the booth and wrote “None of the above” on each and every race. Now I’ve read that Philadelphia, where I vote, won’t even count write in votes, even though they r supposed to. As a late bloomer student I have 10s of thousands of $$ in student loans that I’m having to pay with my Social Security check that the Dems don’t give a damn about any more than the GOP. I’m terrified that I’m going to kick off & my children are going to be hounded & harassed by SallieMae/Navie nt. So, Carl & other young people, I feel your pain. I also know from life experience that if there is one…
 
 
+6 # Kauai John 2014-11-09 18:01
If you didn't vote, you have no influence on what the politician is going to run on next time.

For those of you who didn't show up because you didn't want to vote for the lessor of two evils, your choices next time are both going to be even more evil.

You have to prove that you'll show up before you can demand that a politician take a stand on issues important to you.

It is a chicken and egg problem.
 
 
0 # luluville 2014-11-10 16:29
I agree, Kauai. The olds have power because they vote. How can young voters blackmail a political party by threatening not to vote when they don't vote in large numbers? It's silly. Prove that you have the power. VOTE!
 
 
+3 # Kauai John 2014-11-09 18:37
Here is an alternative view:

Election 2014 Postmortem: We Fucking Did This To Ourselves
http://jezebel.com/election-2014-postmortem-we-fucking-did-this-to-oursel-1654948653
 
 
+1 # Dean2030 2014-11-09 18:58
The stupiest act in the world is NOT TO VOTE. It doesn't matter if none of the candidates or issues appeal to you. Voting is a privilege that many people throughout the world are fighting and dying for. How dare you stay home because the candidates and their messages don't "motivate" you? The thousands of Americans who fought for our independence and freedom don't "motivate" you? With citizens like you, we won't have a country soon. If you really cared about justice, public education, health care, etc., you would have gotten off your ass and voted. I'm glad you voiced your opinions on what motivates you, because, hopefully, the Dems will get their act together and put out unified messages covering your concerns from now on. I hope this is a memorable lesson for them. But voting in this country should be automatic for every eligible voter. No one should take elections for granted. Our right to vote may get lost if taken for granted. Remember that many citizens in southern states cannot vote because of draconian voter ID laws. If you thought the country's economy, job situation, public education, homelessness and health care were in bad shape now, just wait until the new Congress gets into action. You haven't seen nothing yet. Thank your nonvoting selves for the debacle that happens starting in January 2015.
 
 
+3 # Kauai John 2014-11-09 19:39
Dean2030:
I agree with you.

But what if there is no Democratic Party message? What if the difference we perceive between the Democrats and the Republicans is all an illusion?

I read Gibson's rant and want to spank him for being a spoiled brat. Yet, I can also find myself often wondering if there really is a difference between parties other than rhetoric. Is it all just theater?

It gets very depressing at times. So much so that I want to drop out. Then I'll become part of the problem.
 
 
+2 # FLBeach 2014-11-09 21:52
Nice letter
You say voters of your age support 'education and job creation' but in this election you voted for legalized marijuana, reduced sentences for drug offenses, more sick time and a higher minimum wage. None of these issues improve education or create jobs.
You want to get paid more for doing less with the right to get stoned and get a free pass on breaking the law
 
 
+3 # ryanjeanes 2014-11-09 22:09
Is the author of this article profoundly stupid? I ask earnestly. Democrats DID address all of his issues ad nauseam! What the hell universe does this guy live in!

Even if they didn't address them to the degree he would have liked, his argument is the equivalent of saying, "Group A supports me in 1/2 of what I want accomplished and Group B wants to thwart every last thing I want to accomplish. I could vote A and get at least some of what I want but I will instead not choose A, let B get into power, and virtually GUARANTEE I LOSE EVERYTHING!" I ask again: Is the author of this article profoundly stupid?
 
 
+1 # teodell_70 2014-11-09 22:12
For the most part i agree with the article. While people should always vote I certainly saw the mentioned void of Dem message. Here in Kansas we had a chance to see real change unheard of in such a red state. In the end though the only ads seemed to be the 'better than the other guy' or positioning themselves away from Obama type of ads. It didn't get the job done. It still leaves me with a lot of hope though for the future.
As I was reading the acticle I was reminded of similiar disillusion from young republicians from the GOP in recent years. More over as I read through many of the comments, I again saw the same disconnect of younger voters versus the party playing out. Whether the Party, GOP or DNCC, likes it or not the future is the younger voters so how the party connects with them is critical.
While I hate the selfish attitude many show, young and old, many young people seem engaged or at least trying. I know plenty of middle age people that are very selfish and non engaged so it's more an attitude that's all too common and not so simple as 'selfish young voters'.
 
 
+3 # moonrigger 2014-11-10 08:07
Carl, while I agree with much of what you say, as someone who fought (and is still fighting) for the causes you are now part of, I have to say that making excuses for the millenials et al, the young people who failed to vote this election, isn't going to help you make the changes you want to see. Many of my generation laid our lives, families, and jobs on the line to end the war in Vietnam, bring about women's rights, LGBT rights, environmental protection, etc, because it meant more to us than beer, football, getting laid, wearing the latest sneakers, buying the latest electronic gadget, imbibing the most exotic wine, downloading the latest app, or driving the coolest car. We didn't sit facing a screen when we wanted to make change--we gathered in living rooms and faced each other while we hatched our plans, reached out with our music, art, or went door to door. Times have changed, yet if you really want populism, young people need to reacquaint in live mode, and reclaim our Constitutional rights to do so. (The right has co-opted the churches, yet once WE had their support.) You have no idea how hard we fought just to get the vote for people under 21. That too many millenials take this for granted and are cavalier about voting shows a failure of leadership from the bottom up, as well as top down. You're a flock with no lead bird. Don't be all talk and no action. And don't point fingers when your strategy doesn't work. Rethink and regroup. Go forward, and don't splinter.
 
 
0 # 22dragon 2014-11-10 08:40
Too many lead-birds & not enough awake-flock.... ..
 
 
-1 # 22dragon 2014-11-10 08:42
Why should one vote when the only choices are two panderers & liars? When Bill Clinton decided that the road to election was to wear both hats....neo-con servative & neo-liberal at one time, he solidified the two party system as one Great Party flying a single flag. Bill's follies in Haiti just another indication of how out-of-touch with reality career politicians & today's nominated candidates have become. At 75 years old I vote "green". "A vote thrown away" says my thirty year old son. Civic Duty? It is our civic duty to fight for liberty & justice for all. Instead our children fight to protect the corporate-succe ss of those who feed the Consumption Disease America calls an economy. When you can't sell any more washing-machine s or i-phones, go to war. You too can have a job at Lockeed-Martin. I will not vote for Oligarchs in the Facist State we are becoming.
 
 
+2 # banichi 2014-11-10 16:34
I have read through the article, and all the comments that followed it. Remembering that Carl DID vote, and that his article was an exposition of what he has seen reflected in his generation, not just what he himself believes or has done, I have the following to say.
1. I am 67
2. I am a progressive because I have seen the failure of Obama to live up to his 2008 campaign promises.
3. I am a registered Democrat, because though the party has progressively disgusted me for its spinelessness and lack of care for CITIZENS vs DONORS, there are really only two choices. Like it or not.
4. I support Social Security. I earned it over my lifetime. I do not support wars that only benefit corporate greed and greater paranoid 'security' oversight.
5. I got my bachelor's degree when it was subsidized by the state of CA and did not cost me years of work after. Student debt now is killing the future and should be forgiven.
6. If you didn't, or don't, vote, you throw away your power as a citizen. You have nothing to say about how it turned out. I don't want to hear any complaints. If your issues were not being addressed, that just means you need to participate MORE. Speak UP.
7. Mandatory voting in the 11 countries that require it may not result in better government, but it does result in a more informed electorate.
8. Voting is a duty. Yes, and a privilege that people have died for. Are you worthy of having that privilege?
 
 
0 # ker33 2014-11-10 19:38
Then you didn't pay attention: Elizabeth Warren grilling student loan execs, Senate jobs bills that died in the House, POTUS begging the legislature to hand him a bill raising the federal minimum wage, you missed it all - and MORE!

What was so much more important to you? Selfies? Instagram? Here's some advice from a Gen-Xer & former History professor: try turning your tv to CSPAN, sit down, and watch.

And this bull about Obama not living up to his promises? Go back to 4TH grade: THERE ARE 3 BRANCHES OF GOVERNMENT: EXECUTIVE, LEGISLATIVE, JUDICIAL; A SYSTEM OF CHECKS AND BALANCES INSURES *EQUAL* POWER. When partisan bickering suffocates legislative progress, the president can't just do their jobs. It's not weakness, it's illegal.

Long before Obama, Americans stratified, then decided "cooperation" is a dirty word. In the past, Congress worked together; now the GOP's STATED GOAL is to OPPOSE EVERYTHING OBAMA WANTS, no matter how much it hurts the people. And you blame the Democrats?

It was NOT the Democrats who ignored jobs, failed to raise the minimum wage, or didn't change the student loan system. YOU let GOP obstructionism color your opinion. And then blamed it on the Democrats. Way to go, genius.

I'm limited to a small number of characters here, or I'd go on. You - and all others who pay no more than SUPERFICIAL attention to government - blame the Democrats for the failings of the GOP.

You know what? I'm glad you don't vote. You aren't responsible enough.
 
 
+1 # grandone@charter.net 2014-11-11 23:03
Not that anyone will read this comment so far down the line. I think Carl Gibson nailed it. Democrats did assume millennals would vote Democratic. It was a demographic that was assumed. "How could they vote Republican?" No one asked the question correctly, "How can we inspire them to vote for us?"
That needs to get fixed in 2016.
 
 
0 # rsnfan 2014-11-12 22:33
Carl, here is your answer. Watch the Bernie Sanders video with Bill Moyer at this link. He is saying what we all want to hear.
http://mic.com/articles/103902/bernie-sanders-needs-to-run-for-president-here-s-why
 
 
+1 # dflawson 2014-11-14 13:01
Blah, blah, blah. Whine all you want, but there is no excuse for not voting. It's the younger generation that's going to make this country a better place. That power is yours. It's no one else's fault if you choose not to exercise that power.
 

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