RSN Fundraising Banner
FB Share
Email This Page
add comment
Print

Gibson writes: "Do you want a higher minimum wage? Free childcare? Universal healthcare? A free college education? Then vote for politicians who support those things, and vote out those who don't."

(photo: Shutterstock)
(photo: Shutterstock)


How Voting in Large Numbers Dramatically Improves Society

By Carl Gibson, Reader Supported News

21 October 14

 

o you want a higher minimum wage? Free childcare? Universal healthcare? A free college education? Then vote for politicians who support those things, and vote out those who don’t. It may not seem that simple, but if enough people adhere to this strategy with the patience of several more elections, all those things will happen here. Denmark has proven that to the world by having a model society made possible by a consistently high voter turnout rate. The last election in Denmark brought out 87 percent of the population. To compare, the 2012 presidential election only saw a 57 percent turnout of registered voters in the U.S.

I wrote a column earlier this month, called “The Election Is a Month Away. Fucking. Vote.” I laid out my case for voting this year to reject a culture of gridlock and corruption, but some still argued that a vote for any candidate was a vote for a rigged system, and that even if decent politicians were to be elected, they would be hamstrung by other members of their legislative body. Others chastised me for swearing at people in my headline and making people feel bullied into voting. So instead of my trying to intimidate you into voting, just take a look at Denmark’s quality of life, which is made possible by a consistently high voter turnout.

The minimum wage in Denmark is $21 an hour, and McDonald’s workers make enough to provide for their families and even have enough left over to save for retirement. This isn’t because McDonald’s has incredibly nice franchise owners in Denmark, but because a unionized workforce demanded it. Thanks to the union negotiating on behalf of workers, McDonald’s employees in Denmark also enjoy paid vacations, guaranteed overtime pay, and two days off per week. Compare that to the U.S., where the minimum wage is still $7.25 for most McDonald’s workers. Even in Seattle, which has the highest minimum wage in the country at $15 an hour, McDonald’s employees are still making a full six dollars less per hour than their Danish counterparts.

There’s a growing movement in the U.S. to guarantee all fast-food and retail workers a $15 an hour minimum wage and the right to organize a union. President Obama even acknowledged the efforts of these workers and applauded their efforts to fight for a living wage. If we were to demand that all candidates asking for our vote support $15 and a union, and if we voted out all the ones who didn’t, fast-food workers here could enjoy the same pay and benefits as the workers in Denmark. And the American people largely support it – Chicago voters overwhelmingly support a $15 an hour minimum wage by an 87 to 13 margin. And as of this past June, 70 percent of Americans support increasing the minimum wage to at least $10.10 an hour. If all of those Americans voted for candidates who supported a higher minimum wage, it would happen quickly.

Danes also enjoy free college, in which higher education is seen as a basic right and is funded with tax dollars. Two of the world’s top 100 universities are also in Denmark. Compare that to America, where students are expected to take on decades’ worth of debt to get a college education, just for the chance to have a good job that pays, say, $21 an hour. And to pay off this debt, students then have to work jobs in a field that’s likely outside the field they studied. The student debt bubble in America has surpassed the $1.2 trillion mark, and many students are putting off traditional life milestones, like marriage, home ownership, and child-rearing. Our government already spends some $69 billion on student aid of some sort. By spending just $62 billion, public universities, which educate about 76 percent of American college students, could be completely tuition-free. All we need to do is elect people to office who promise to do this, and vote in large numbers.

Speaking of child rearing, Denmark’s government recognizes the economic burden of providing daycare for children of working parents, and provides it free of charge to all taxpayers. With an abnormally low birthrate, Denmark was weighing the possibility of cutting the budget for local nurseries. The free daycare initiative started in 2012 as an incentive to get more parents to have babies. A similar program in the U.S. could help ease the burden on working parents who do not have the financial means to hire a full-time sitter or pay for daycare. All we need to do is elect politicians who promise to do everything they can to make sure mothers and fathers with full-time jobs don’t have to worry about the additional expense of daycare.

Additionally, Denmark views healthcare as a human right for all citizens. Prescription medication is free for all Danes under the age of 18, and extremely affordable for adults. Everyone can choose his own doctor, and patient satisfaction with the Danish healthcare system is much higher than in the U.S. Our healthcare system was rated as the most expensive and inefficient by the World Health Organization, and even though the Affordable Care Act successfully expanded Medicaid to middle-class families and made health insurance more affordable for several million Americans, it’s still captive to the for-profit healthcare industry. Denmark spends just 11 percent of its GDP on healthcare, while healthcare costs sucks up 18 percent of the U.S. economy. If we want better healthcare, we have to hold candidates to the promise of fighting for universal health care, or at the very least, a public option like Medicare for all.

It should be obvious that if we want the society that most Americans polled want – universal healthcare, free college, free childcare, and a $21 an hour minimum wage – all we need to do is elect politicians who stand for these things. It may seem impossible now, but look at how far we’ve come as a society in a relatively short amount of time. Before we abolished slavery it would have seemed impossible that, 150 years later, we would re-elect the first black president of the United States. At the turn of the 20th century, it seemed impossible that women would be able to vote. Now, Hillary Clinton is being talked about as a potential front-runner in the 2016 elections. All we need to do is muster the willpower to get the social reforms we deserve.



Carl Gibson, 26, is co-founder of US Uncut, a nationwide creative direct-action movement that mobilized tens of thousands of activists against corporate tax avoidance and budget cuts in the months leading up to the Occupy Wall Street movement. Carl and other US Uncut activists are featured in the documentary "We're Not Broke," which premiered at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival. He currently lives in Madison, Wisconsin. You can contact him at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , and follow him on twitter at @uncutCG.

Reader Supported News is the Publication of Origin for this work. Permission to republish is freely granted with credit and a link back to Reader Supported News.

e-max.it: your social media marketing partner
 

Comments   

We are concerned about a recent drift towards vitriol in the RSN Reader comments section. There is a fine line between moderation and censorship. No one likes a harsh or confrontational forum atmosphere. At the same time everyone wants to be able to express themselves freely. We'll start by encouraging good judgment. If that doesn't work we'll have to ramp up the moderation.

General guidelines: Avoid personal attacks on other forum members; Avoid remarks that are ethnically derogatory; Do not advocate violence, or any illegal activity.

Remember that making the world better begins with responsible action.

- The RSN Team

 
+14 # elizabethblock 2014-10-21 09:05
Doh.
Maybe we should have a law forbidding anyone who did not vote to criticize the government.
 
 
-1 # RobertMStahl 2014-10-21 13:50
Do the machines REQUIRE a paper trail? I believe this is a fact. Where does management face off with chaos, but, always on the other SIDE of the ripple?
 
 
-5 # RGV.REG 2014-10-21 21:17
IF YOU ARE FORBIDDEN TO CRITICIZE BEFORE VOTING... CHECK THIS OUT !
.
... BEFORE YOU CAN CRITICIZE, YOU MUST VOTE FIRST... AND HERE'S YOUR CHOICES
.
DO YOU WANT YOUR RIGHT HAND CUT OFF, OR
DO YOU WANT YOUR LEFT HAND CUT OFF?
.
REMEMBER, YOU DON'T GET TO CRITICIZE BEFORE YOU VOTE!
...
DO YOU REALLY WANT TO VOTE FOR SOMETHING YOU DON'T WANT?
THINK ABOUT IT!
 
 
+17 # jsluka 2014-10-21 14:37
Dumb comment in response to an ill-informed article. Denmark's political system is totally different from the US one, and that's why it works. It has a multi-party system using party-list proportional representation, like most other democracies in the world today. This means that it isn't just a choice between two equally useless and corrupt parties like it is in the US. In the proportional representation system everyone's vote counts because in an election you get to vote for both a candidate and a party - two separate votes. The candidates who win are elected, but also a number of politicians are appointed based on the number of votes their party receives. This empowers smaller or 'third' parties, who then often hold the balance of power between the larger parties and can influence them. If it was as easy as the author of this article says that all we need to do is vote for the people who have policies we support and against people who have policies we oppose then the system would work we would have changed it long ago. That's why this article is basically an insult to its readers. (Continued below)
 
 
+18 # jsluka 2014-10-21 14:38
(Continued from above) Do not be fooled; the problem is not that people do not vote, the problem is that the system is corrupt and it does not matter who you vote for if your only two choices are between Tweedle-Dumb and Tweedle-Dumber. Both the US parties are pro-corporate and pro-war; so who do we vote for that will change that? The only hope we have is to try to change the system by introducing mixed-member proportional representation so that significant third and fourth parties can emerge. Unfortunately, I can't see that happening.
 
 
+6 # RMDC 2014-10-21 19:39
I agree with jsluka. The US system is rigged and no matter how many people vote the results will always be the same. The two parties are 95% the same and they control US electoral politics.
 
 
-11 # MidwestTom 2014-10-21 21:35
Denmark doesn't have much a military, so that cost iOS minimal. We are the ones 'protecting' them. Nobody is protecting us.

Denmark has a low birthrate; what a blessing; we have a moderate birth rate and millions of people here illegally with more arriving every day. These extra people require schools, are over 50 % of those i jail in our border states. Denmark does't have a 22% un-employent rate like we do (those reported plus those that have dropped out of the labor pool).
 
 
+4 # bingers 2014-10-23 09:59
Quoting elizabethblock:
Doh.
Maybe we should have a law forbidding anyone who did not vote to criticize the government.


No, we should have a law requiring everyone to vote, if they are citizens. Even prisoners. Ad if the state thinks you don't qualify they should go to court BEFORE the election and be required to PROVE it.
 
 
+13 # Capn Canard 2014-10-21 09:07
And notice that those with the most wealth are doing their best to limit voter participation. Both Repukes and Dumocrats run ads to discourage voting.
 
 
+22 # walthe310 2014-10-21 09:13
I support universal suffrage because it is fair to all citizens. Once you begin to limit the right to vote, the question becomes who can vote and who decides who can vote. It becomes a very divisive question that can only be avoided by universal suffrage.

A property qualification has been a sticking point since the Greeks invented democracy more than 2000 years ago. Property owners are supposedly the responsible members of society and they often resent paying taxes for government services to the poor. They argue that the poor will sell their votes to the highest bidders. That may be true to some extent, but owning property or other wealth does not make an individual an informed voter. Without the vote, segments of the population can be safely ignored by government. That in turn produces a weaker society.
 
 
+15 # Barbara K 2014-10-21 09:36
I think that the gerrymandering should be reversed back to where it was in 2007 and ended. No more gerrymandering allowed anywhere. Use a National standard for voters and deny no one a vote. That should go a long way to making at least the voting fair again.

VOTE THE LUNATICS OUT FROM LOCAL TO DC

..
 
 
+13 # ritawalpoleague 2014-10-21 10:57
Barbara K, please take time to view the documentary I saw after the '08 non-election, with numerous League of Women Voters. Title of said documentary, "The Uncounted".

Detail it did, what I'd heard for a number of years, from both my now ex-husband, a pioneer in the software industry, and his co-harts. It is easy breezy for election fraud to occur, via the 'fixing' of any and all elections via software manipulation. I call it:
VOTE DEATH BY DIEBOLD.

What is essential is immediate confirmation, for each and every voter, that his/her vote has been counted, how it has been made, and also what that entire vote cast has done the entire tally. This could and should be done by paper ballot, each with a confidential number on it, that, when scanned, appears as described above, on a screen at each voting site. Every voter then should be permitted to get a paper copy of what has appeared on screen, including their confidential number, for whom and what they have voted, the tally, etc..

Time for us folks to wake up, and with courage and determination plus, fix the dreadful mess we are now in. Yes, Barbara K, gerrymandering should be ended, this time permanently, vs. the current m.o., as well as buying off of pols. via lobbying, via lobbyists such as AIPAC. Sad but true, far too many pols. today, from both major parties, are bought off puppet clowns of the 1% villainaires, now our actual rulers.
 
 
+8 # wantrealdemocracy 2014-10-21 09:24
We need to "muster the will power"? Like this horrible level of corruption in our government is our fault? Mr. Gibson did not mention the bribes that our 'honored Members of Congress' take. He said nothing about the computer ballots that can not be checked for validity, or the 24/7 bombardment of propaganda that spread lies to the voters with bright colors and music that has been studied as to making a positive reaction to our emotions.

Our electoral system is so flawed and corrupt that it is too late to consider how to fix it. The two party system is so powerful that no candidate has any chance to get elected if they have not been approved by the small group of very wealthy people who make up the plutocracy that run this nation.

Voting under these conditions only gives the bought and paid for elected officials some degree of legitimacy which they do not deserve. If you still want to go though this farce, do not vote for any candidate who is a member of either of the two corporately funded major political parties.

The only way we have any chance of changing our rotten government is to get out on the street in resistance.
 
 
+6 # tedrey 2014-10-21 09:35
If the party that promised the Danish voter social welfare also had a history of fracking, drone warfare, over-militarize d police, collusion with oppressive banks and corporations, and a general inability to carry through on its social welfare promises, that voter might have a more difficult decision at the polls.
 
 
+2 # Johnny 2014-10-21 10:06
This is a painful choice: in the 1930s German voters could vote for the party that had saved the economy and provided jobs and comfortable income; but there also was the little matter of extreme racism. U.S. voters can vote for Democrats who promise social services (even though we all know they will not deliver, even if they control both houses and the presidency); but there is the little matter of wars of aggression and genocide. How will we explain to our children that we voted for the Nazi Party, or the Democratic Party, because of its economic program while ignoring its policy of mass murder?
 
 
+3 # bingers 2014-10-23 09:55
Quoting Johnny:
This is a painful choice: in the 1930s German voters could vote for the party that had saved the economy and provided jobs and comfortable income; but there also was the little matter of extreme racism. U.S. voters can vote for Democrats who promise social services (even though we all know they will not deliver, even if they control both houses and the presidency); but there is the little matter of wars of aggression and genocide. How will we explain to our children that we voted for the Nazi Party, or the Democratic Party, because of its economic program while ignoring its policy of mass murder?


No we don't know that. In fact they did deliver on 80% of their stated agenda during the 2 months of the filibuster proof Senate.
 
 
+3 # toma8012 2014-10-21 11:41
Ummm, *neither* corporate party is in favor of *any* of those policy changes . . . which is why *NOT* voting for the corporate parties is preferable. Either vote green party or justice party or don't vote at all, lest you continue being an enabler, like the hordes of liberals who keep propping up the corporate democratic party by voting for them under the misguided notion that they are "the lesser of two evils".
 
 
-1 # EmilyCragg 2014-10-21 12:14
I agree, changes are needed. For one thing the UCC [commercial corporate statutes and codes] need to be routed and obsoleted, and Common Laws need to be put in their place, so that Groundless, pointless wars for profit become criminal acts of violence for their perpetrators.

Then campaign funding needs to revert to government's responsibility, so nobody can just buy into to politics.

But the fact is, the entire voting system is rigged top-to-bottom, at the precinct level, the vote counting level, the software level and the Court level where disputes come up.

So voting is a pointless exercise at this time because the two parties together run ONE REGIME, THE WAR PARTY.

Emily Windsor-Cragg
 
 
-18 # ln3181984@gmail.com 2014-10-21 13:12
Denmark pays $21/hour which equates to $3.59/hour in USD...
 
 
+13 # CarlGibson 2014-10-21 15:34
No, they pay $21 USD an hour.

"In 2011, it paid wages of 530 million Danish kroner to what would be equal to 2,040 full-time workers. That’s different from talking about what the typical worker actually got. Still, when you do the math, the company paid the mathematically average full-time worker about $46,700 that year"

http://www.politifact.com/punditfact/statements/2014/sep/03/other-98/can-you-make-45000year-mcdonalds-denmark/

But thanks for trying to be unnecessarily contrarian. Who cares if you don't know what you're talking about?
 
 
+6 # amye 2014-10-21 13:44
Dude, its just not that easy when you have a 2 party system and your only choice is a democrat or a republican! How can you vote for someone who stands for the values you espouse if they are not on the ballot?
 
 
-1 # toma8012 2014-10-21 17:42
Exactly. The author completely skirts the root issue here, which is the inherent corruption within the system itself, where two corporate parties masquerade as "choices" when in reality, you have no choice. Either vote third party (i.e., the only candidates who actually support the issues stated in the article) or don't vote at all. Every time you vote for a republican or a democrat, you are putting your stamp of approval on the corruption and enabling its perpetuation. Wake up, liberals!
 
 
+3 # JJS 2014-10-23 04:50
Voting in the general elections is not the "be all end all" of voting and participation in democracy. There is also choosing a candidate for the party in the primary elections.

In the 80's-90's the Republicans pushed really hard to have open primaries where any registered voter could vote in any party's primary. It did not pass in all states and I don't think they are pushing that agenda as much today. This allowed many registered Independents and Reps to vote in the Democrat's primaries and choose which candidates would represent the Dems. Of course the Dems could turn around and try to influence the Reps primary but it was not an agenda (open primaries) the Dems pushed. Plus, many Independents are Tea Party or Libertarian.

It is even more important to vote in the primary elections if you are concerned about the direction a particular party is going. To "Vote early and often" means that you vote in the primary, then you vote in every general election, not just the year the POTUS is running.
 
 
+4 # bingers 2014-10-23 09:52
Quoting toma8012:
Exactly. The author completely skirts the root issue here, which is the inherent corruption within the system itself, where two corporate parties masquerade as "choices" when in reality, you have no choice. Either vote third party (i.e., the only candidates who actually support the issues stated in the article) or don't vote at all. Every time you vote for a republican or a democrat, you are putting your stamp of approval on the corruption and enabling its perpetuation. Wake up, liberals!


Sorry, but there is o true equivalence between the parties. And third party votes amount to nothing less than a vote for Republicans and paradoxically a vote to destroy democracy.
 
 
+4 # lewagner 2014-10-21 19:46
Quoting amye:
Dude, its just not that easy when you have a 2 party system and your only choice is a democrat or a republican! How can you vote for someone who stands for the values you espouse if they are not on the ballot?

Exactly. I couldn't have said it better myself!!
 
 
+3 # socrates2 2014-10-23 11:03
amye, when was the last time you voted or actually read your ballot?
Every single alternative candidate and third (fourth, fifth, sixth, etc.) party is listed. The problem is that that may be the first time in your life you've heard of them! The fact is few alternative candidates can afford the big speech cash required to buy costly media "time."
As a citizen-voter, the burden is on you to investigate who the non-duopoly candidates are in your neighborhood/pr ecinct, read their platforms, volunteer to help them, donate to their campaign, spread the word, etc.
Sitting back and relying on TV/radio, billboard ads paid for by corporate sponsors to hand you candidates willing to "deliver you from evil" just won't do post-"Citizens United." It's time the grown-ups took control of their future.
Look at where Bernaysian, status quo voting "behaviors" have delivered us...
Be well.
 
 
+10 # Ken Halt 2014-10-21 20:40
It amazes me that many people commenting here have given up on US democracy. Yes, it is in bad shape, but that is because the US electorate is not engaged (think voting) and not informed (think intellectually lazy couch potatoes). Carl Gibson is making the point that democracy can work, and does work, in other nations because the populace informs itself and votes. The European socialist democracies have a better quality of life and higher standard of living than the US. Germany, with a quarter the population of the US, exports four times the manufactured goods. Voters in those countries paid attention and voted intelligently. Look at the US voters' choices: Ronald Reagan, Arnold Schwarzenner, Hulk Hogan, Mitch McConnell, Scott Walker, Newt Gingrich, Darrel Issa, Paul Ryan, Tom DeLay, Rick Perry, etc. There are a few elected officials fighting for the little guy, Elizabeth Warren, Barbara Lee, Bernie Sanders, Alan Grayson, to name a few of the most prominent. Voters can add to that number by engaging and voting, they can pressure others to legislate for "...the general welfare...". No, it won't happen overnight, it will be a long slog, in the wake of three decades of conservative malfeasance, to rebuild a responsive US democracy. It will take grit and determination, but it can be done, and it is worth doing. Thank you, Carl Gibson, for pointing out the reason for the failure of US democracy.
 
 
+4 # Vardoz 2014-10-22 09:00
We can do it but we must believe in ourselves and in BIG numbers!!!! When you have nothing you have nothing to lose by trying- So don't throw in the towel and VOTE FOR THOSE WHO CARE ABOUT YOU. Don't buy the words of the lying GOP that has brought down our nation, cut food stamps by 8 billion while giving billions per day for war, voted against the women against violence act, refused to raise the minimum wage and are climate change deniers. They support the polluters and those who would rob us of all that we need to survive and thrive! So lets show them we can do it and tell your rep no more stealing votes with those Dielbold voting machines!!!! we want watch dog groups and paper trails! I just called Leahy, head of the judiciary committee, he's got a lot of clout and told him we need watch dog groups all across the nation to make sure these lying, criminal crazy GOP reps don't steal the vote! This has nothing to do with ID laws this has to do with stealing votes and absentee ballots which the GOP has been indulging in due to not enough oversight- so EVERYONE needs to call their rep and tell them we don't want our vote stolen! We want more oversight.
 
 
+2 # bingers 2014-10-23 09:47
here is a downside to more people voting. Since a country needs both left and right wing participation, and increased participation would doom the Republican party to rump status....
 
 
+2 # bingers 2014-10-23 09:48
(Not to argue that the right doesn't currently have their heads firmly implanted in their rumps)
 
 
+1 # socrates2 2014-10-23 11:27
Ken Halt, I don't know where you vote, but in my ballot names of authentic candidates with very real, solid, alternative worldviews were printed--right next to the likes of hacks Reagan and Arnie. Recall Barry Commoner? Ralph Nader? Peter Camejo? Laura Wells? etc.
As a voter, I have it in my power to choose whom I will delegate my power to as my representative. I owe it to myself to find out who that individual is, will be, and what s/he really stands for. Will they stand by their word? Will they represent *me* honorably with the delegated power?
Watching corporate-groom ed candidates on the tube kissing babies or walking down immaculately hosed-down blue collar avenues shaking hands in slow motion with "salt-of-the-ea rth" central casting types to a Mantovani or down-tempo harmonica soundtrack doesn't cut it...
Be well.
 
 
+3 # JJS 2014-10-24 04:53
Quoting socrates2:
Ken Halt, I don't know where you vote, but in my ballot names of authentic candidates with very real, solid, alternative worldviews were printed--right next to the likes of hacks Reagan and Arnie. Recall Barry Commoner? Ralph Nader? Peter Camejo? Laura Wells? etc. ...

But those alternate candidates you mention were NOT chosen by the electorate, even if they were on the ballot, these bozos were chosen: "Ronald Reagan, Arnold Schwarzenner, Hulk Hogan, Mitch McConnell, Scott Walker, Newt Gingrich, Darrel Issa, Paul Ryan, Tom DeLay, Rick Perry, etc."(-Ken Halt)
All and more bozos elected to represent the people. Unbelievable!

I try to only patronize commercial free, community supported forms of media for that very reason you mention of avoiding the garbage campaign and commercial/corp orate advertising.
 
 
-1 # DougNJ 2014-10-26 22:40
The supposed "advantages" of the Danish economic environment, as put forth in your McDonalds example, is all SMOKE AND MIRRORS.

$21 per hour vs. $7.25 per hour seems like a drastic difference. BUT, let's look at the buying power of those 2 apparently disparate incomes:

Denmark:

$21.00 per hour
- 11.68 Income Tax @ 55.6%
= 9.32
- 1.68 Social Security Tax @ 8%
$ 7.64 Net Income per hour

Cost of Big Macs in Denmark:

$ 5.37 Menu price
+ 1.34 Sales Tax @ 25%
$ 6.71 Actual cost of Big Mac in Denmark

Now lets look at how many Danish Big Macs that hour of income can purchase:

7.64 Net Income per hour
÷ 6.71 Price of Big Mac
= 1.14 Big Macs per each hour of labo
 
 
-1 # DougNJ 2014-10-26 22:41
USA:

$ 7.25 per hour
- 0.00 Income Tax (Annual Income below minimum level to be taxed)
= 7.25
- .40 Social Security Tax @ 7.65%
$ 6.85 Net Income per hour

Cost of Big Macs in USA:

$ 4.68 Menu price
+ .32 Sales Tax @ 7%
$ 5.00 Actual cost of Big Mac in USA

Now lets look at how many Big Macs that hour of income can purchase in the USA:

6.85 Net Income per hour
÷ 5.00 Price of Big Mac
= 1.37 Big Macs per each hour of labor

Uhhhmmmm….. seems like working and buying food is a better deal for the minimum wage earner in the USA than it is for the "average" McDonald's employee in Denmark.

By the way, you based your argument on the "average" pay for full-time employees at Danish McDonald's ($46,700 per year), which encompasses higher-paid management individuals, who undoubtedly earn much higher levels of pay than the statistical "average". What are the wage rates BELOW that statistical average of $21 per hour? They can't, by definition, be $21.
 
 
+1 # tedrey 2014-10-27 10:13
But as Carl points out, the Dane gets a lot more than Big Macs with his salary. He also gets free health care, free college, free child care, and a more solid social security than ours, all of which the American worker has to pay himself out of his income. I think the Dane's better off. (So does my Danish nephew, by the way.)
 
 
0 # Buddha 2014-10-27 12:01
"Do you want a higher minimum wage? Free childcare? Universal healthcare? A free college education? Then vote for politicians who support those things, and vote out those who don’t."

And if neither of the available candidates in our two-party duopoly really support these ideas, then like most Americans you are just shit out of luck...
 

THE NEW STREAMLINED RSN LOGIN PROCESS: Register once, then login and you are ready to comment. All you need is a Username and a Password of your choosing and you are free to comment whenever you like! Welcome to the Reader Supported News community.

RSNRSN