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Gibson writes: "Your lining up to buy Apple's latest product is enabling their abuse of workers around the world, including in the United States. Of course, Apple isn't the only one guilty of this."

Members of the media look at the new iPhone 6 during Apple's launch event in Cupertino, Calif., on Tuesday. (photo: EPA)
Members of the media look at the new iPhone 6 during Apple's launch event in Cupertino, Calif., on Tuesday. (photo: EPA)


How the iPhone 6 Helps Perpetuate Modern-Day Slavery

By Carl Gibson, Reader Supported News

10 September 14

 

“How do we have this amazing microtechnology? Because the factory where they’re making these, they jump off the fucking roof because it’s a nightmare in there. You really have a choice – you can have candles and horses and be a little kinder to each other, or let someone suffer immeasurably far away just so you can leave a mean comment on YouTube while you’re taking a shit.” ~ Louis C.K., Of Course, But Maybe

he iPhone 6 is coming out soon. But you don’t need one. Your lining up to buy Apple’s latest product is enabling their abuse of workers around the world, including in the United States. Of course, Apple isn’t the only one guilty of this. The HP laptop I’m using to write this article was made in the same way. As is the Samsung smartphone I used to tweet this article after it was published. But Apple is the most glaring example that our need for shiny new gadgets perpetuates atrocities.

Since 1998, seven million people have died in a civil war that continues to plague the Eastern region of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The war began when Rwanda-backed rebels attempted an overthrow of the Congolese government. The government teamed up with local militias known as the “Mai Mai,” who are known to occupy local villages, steal resources, and rape women. The DRC has become known as the “rape capital of the world,” in which marauders use rape as a weapon of coercion. Today, Mai Mai fighters and corrupt members of the Congolese military both enslave children in the DRC to mine columbite and tantalum, which together can form coltan, a necessary ingredient in modern laptops and smartphones.

As this mini-documentary from the Pulitzer Center shows, children as young as 13 are forced to work in the mines for as little as 2 dollars a day. They wear no safety protection, carry a store-bought, battery-powered flashlight, and often die from brutal working conditions that result in suffocation, cave-ins, and death from sheer exhaustion. Multinational corporations like Apple, Samsung, Dell, and HP all depend on the Congolese mining operations for their raw materials, as 80% of the world’s coltan supply comes from the region. The children have no other option but to work in the mines, because school is beyond the financial means of ordinary Congolese families.

The raw materials mined in Congo are then sent to factories in China – most notably, the Foxconn plant in Shenzhen. The factory has been described by local media as a “labor camp,” in which teenage students are sought out for employment and are forced to work more than double or even triple the overtime limit (36 hours a month under China’s labor laws), and workers are routinely uncompensated for injuries suffered on the job. Seventeen workers attempted suicide, and 14 died jumping from the roof of the building in 2010. The company responded by putting anti-suicide nets around the building, and forced employees to sign agreements stating that their employer would be exempt from lawsuits brought by family members in the event of their suicide. Foxconn claims to have raised workers’ wages to $298 per month, but workers say those pay raises never came.

After the raw materials for phones and computers are mined by underpaid and overworked Congolese teenagers, and those materials are assembled by underpaid and overworked Chinese teenagers, American teenagers and adults making poverty wages are then put to work in Apple stores hawking the new phones and computers. This is not unlike the triangular slave trade of the 18th century, in which African slaves were traded to America, American sugar and tobacco was traded to Europe, and European textiles, rum, and manufactured goods were traded to Africa. This time, the slaves are in Africa and Asia, and Americans are forced into wage slavery by an economy that encourages corporations to distribute profits upward to executives, while paying workers less and less.

This Forbes article describes how little Apple’s 30,000 Apple store employees nationwide make compared to Apple CEO Tim Cook, who received stock options last year worth $570 million. The average Apple store employee makes $11 to $12 an hour. Sure, it’s higher than the federal minimum wage, but that only amounts to $23,400 to $24,960 in pre-tax income for a full-time employee working 52 weeks in a year. That means even though Apple is raking in massive, record profits by selling expensive technology, and even though Apple has twice more cash on hand than the U.S. Treasury, and even though Apple pays a far lower effective tax rate than the average American family, their workers make so little that they qualify for food stamps and Medicaid.

However, it isn’t just low-paid Apple store workers who are getting shafted. Tech engineers and coding experts looking for work in Silicon Valley have recently found themselves on the end of a wage restriction conspiracy. A Pando.com investigation published leaked emails showing that leading tech companies like Google, Apple, Dreamworks, Comcast, eBay, Lucasfilm, and others have been conspiring together to keep wages for tech engineers at a set rate, violating workers’ rights to seek competitive compensation. The wage conspiracy encompasses over 1,000,000 employees at over a dozen companies.

Corporations like Apple and HP could do the right thing by simply entering into contracts with the Congolese and Chinese governments to ensure that raw materials are mined and products are manufactured by workers who are paid a living wage and given adequate benefits. They could pay American workers at least $15 an hour, and provide opportunities for high-performing employees to share in some of the skyrocketing profits that were normally only preserved for executives and wealthy shareholders. All of this would result in iPhones and iPads costing a few dollars more. But American consumers would still be more than willing to buy shiny new gadgets for a little more if they knew they were made sustainably.

The decision will ultimately be up to us, the buyers. We either have to collectively decide that we’ll hold onto our current products as long as we can until the promise of sustainable manufacturing is made, or to line up like cattle for the next level of expensive gadgets made possible by a tremendous amount of human suffering.



Carl Gibson, 27, is co-founder of US Uncut, a nonviolent grassroots movement that mobilized thousands to protest corporate tax dodging and budget cuts in the months leading up to Occupy Wall Street. Carl and other US Uncut activists are featured in the documentary We're Not Broke, which premiered at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival. Carl is also the author of How to Oust a Congressman, an instructional manual on getting rid of corrupt members of Congress and state legislatures based on his experience in the 2012 elections in New Hampshire. He lives in Sacramento, California.

Reader Supported News is the Publication of Origin for this work. Permission to republish is freely granted with credit and a link back to Reader Supported News.

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+26 # A P 2014-09-10 09:43
Great information, as but one example of how big corporations can "afford" to do far more than they are.

Other than to make a point, singling out Apple is pointless. Apple operates within the framework it finds itself, just like consumers operate withing the economy/society they find themselves.

The fundamental changes required to shift attitudes and actions in either case are not under either group's control.

Yes, awareness is the first step, but the core issues are at the level of corporate personhood, fair taxation and breaking the international currency/bankin g cartels.

The BRICS project provides a glimmer of hope in breaking Bretton Woods US$ hegemony, but will it alone lead to fair wages, worker safety and taxation?

No, that involves revoking corporate personhood to make humans responsible for corporate actions and tying corporate tax rates to worker wages/benefits/ conditions. All workers from raw resource extraction to product sales, internationally .
 
 
-45 # DD1946 2014-09-10 10:36
I hate these articles that vilify just one company by name. I am not so dumb that I don't know the others are committing the same abuses. If some company isn't then tell us who they are!

And Mr. Gibson---what kind of phone do YOU have???
 
 
+62 # Billsy 2014-09-10 11:45
I suggest you channel your outrage into rereading the article. Mr. Gibson acknowledged the complicity of HP & Samsung, manufacturers of the gadgets of his choice. He continued to point out that Apple was the best known, most financially successful and most egregious example of this kind of abuse. This article coincides with the flurry of excited news articles on Apple's latest product release.
 
 
+20 # reiverpacific 2014-09-10 15:50
Quoting DD1946:
I hate these articles that vilify just one company by name. I am not so dumb that I don't know the others are committing the same abuses. If some company isn't then tell us who they are!

And Mr. Gibson---what kind of phone do YOU have???

Quoting DD1946:
I hate these articles that vilify just one company by name. I am not so dumb that I don't know the others are committing the same abuses. If some company isn't then tell us who they are!

And Mr. Gibson---what kind of phone do YOU have???


"The HP laptop I’m using to write this article was made in the same way. As is the Samsung smartphone I used to tweet this article after it was published." [Quote from article].
Sheesh -what a grouch and a short-sighted one at that!
Now y'r point was again----?
 
 
+21 # Nominae 2014-09-10 16:36
Quoting DD1946:
I hate these articles that vilify just one company by name. I am not so dumb that I don't know the others are committing the same abuses. If some company isn't then tell us who they are!

And Mr. Gibson---what kind of phone do YOU have???


So, here we see the result of apparent scanning of an article and subsequent rush to comment.

The answers to all of your questions above are contained *IN* the very article that you are so adamant about trashing.

And, if you "hate" an article, that's what your "next page" controller is for.

No one is forcing you to read it.
 
 
+69 # MsAnnaNOLA 2014-09-10 09:54
It would be more beneficial to tell us which companies are doing it right. I want to know what choice would be better.
 
 
+15 # Billsy 2014-09-10 11:46
Nice sentiment, but at present there are none. Readers might choose Credo mobile for their cellular coverage but I truly wonder how many RSN supporters would do just that?
 
 
+1 # TheeKruger 2014-09-10 17:57
Register for Woeigo and give us a couple more months to collect data and users. (:
 
 
0 # backwards_cinderella 2014-09-11 04:11
obviously there are no companies that are doing it "right".
 
 
+2 # pessimizor 2014-09-11 04:38
Quoting MsAnnaNOLA:
It would be more beneficial to tell us which companies are doing it right. I want to know what choice would be better.


https://www.fairphone.com/
 
 
+40 # reiverpacific 2014-09-10 10:02
It's good that Mr Gibson is bringing this subject to light -'cept on RSN, I imagine that a goodly percentage of progressive readers and posters are already familiar with much of it.
But just look around you: like many of my peer group and older, I'm beginning to fear the loss of conversational ability and inter-personal relationships as I witness everybody from middle-age to youth wandering around like dream-walkers attached to their "Smart" devices as if they were their human appendages and not the other way around, hardly able to answer a question or make a statement without hauling a phone or tablet out of some recess in their clothing or purse and twiddling something for reference.
I had a cell phone when very few people had them. They looked like a blunt weapon in a holster on my belt, as I did many construction inspections in remote areas at the time but it's getting really invasive now, especially in places where I play "live" music and people just sit and gawp at screens vacantly rather than listen. I blew a gasket during Labor Day Weekend and walked out of a Wine Bar I'd been playing in weekly for >five years (needless to say for the last time) as it was crowded, claustrophobic, and everybody seemed to be competing to see who could yell loudest into smart phones.
The point is, does ANYBODY, realistically, think that these toy-addicted folks could give a shit about the gobal consequences of their dependence, same as bananas, or coke or -you name it?
I doubt it!
 
 
+14 # Glen 2014-09-10 12:09
reiverpacific, you at least are capable of standing on the outside looking in. Your comments remind me of a little book titled The Lost Art of Letter Writing. Essays I've read point out the loss of conversation, also. An editorial in, of all things, a monthly newsletter put out by an electric company, related a dinner in which the author sat across from his mother-in-law. They sat among folks yakking on phones, texting, yapping at one another and a television blaring in another room. The mother-in-law looked at him and asked, Isn't anybody LISTENING?

Have to insert this. A friend of mine was invited on a date by a woman he liked and assumed it was mutual. She offered to drive the 20 miles to the next town for dinner and movie. She then proceeded to talk on her phone the entire trip. At the first traffic light in the town, he got out of the car and walked all the way back to his house.

We eschewing those head gadgets to the extreme now used, will from now on be on the outside, keeping company with just a handful of conversationali sts and letter writers.
 
 
+5 # reiverpacific 2014-09-10 13:57
Quoting Glen:
reiverpacific, you at least are capable of standing on the outside looking in. Your comments remind me of a little book titled The Lost Art of Letter Writing. Essays I've read point out the loss of conversation, also. An editorial in, of all things, a monthly newsletter put out by an electric company, related a dinner in which the author sat across from his mother-in-law. They sat among folks yakking on phones, texting, yapping at one another and a television blaring in another room. The mother-in-law looked at him and asked, Isn't anybody LISTENING?

Have to insert this. A friend of mine was invited on a date by a woman he liked and assumed it was mutual. She offered to drive the 20 miles to the next town for dinner and movie. She then proceeded to talk on her phone the entire trip. At the first traffic light in the town, he got out of the car and walked all the way back to his house.

We eschewing those head gadgets to the extreme now used, will from now on be on the outside, keeping company with just a handful of conversationalists and letter writers.


Nice story; -heh-heh!
Wonder if she went to the movie alone and kept yakkin' on her phone?
 
 
-18 # MidwesTom 2014-09-10 10:06
More than 3 Billion people, of the world's 7 Billion earn less than $2.00 per day. Any pay above that is appreciated in these desperately poor generally overcrowd countries. It appears evil to us, but any paying work is appreciated there.
 
 
+20 # reiverpacific 2014-09-10 11:27
Quoting MidwesTom:
More than 3 Billion people, of the world's 7 Billion earn less than $2.00 per day. Any pay above that is appreciated in these desperately poor generally overcrowd countries. It appears evil to us, but any paying work is appreciated there.


Possibly but it's not that easy.
The HUGE profits generated by these people for their corporate masters could in a SMALL part be put to provide them with a better life but it's the plutocrats who don't seem to be able to be happy with their existing and still growing abundance.
I grant them the costs of doing business, credit and reasonable reward for inventing and making available something largely beneficial. But obscene profits whilst exploiting the needy is the very essence and definition of capitalism, concurrently the model AND the myth that "Capitalism = Freedom" (But for a few, just like "Americans for Prosperity" and such).
It's not just US companies: I used to watch sadly, women being driven to Indian-owned garment factories in cattle trucks past our office in Bandung, Java, Indonesia from Gawd knows what kind of accommodations.
I myself was chastised for paying my driver and domestic staff a bit over the odds when I lived there, under the specious reasoning that "I'd just get them used to making so much"!
As Tatanka Leyote (Sitting Bull) presciently observed on touring the US with Buffalo Bill's Show "The Wasicu (White Man) can make everything but has never learned to distribute it".
 
 
+12 # Nominae 2014-09-10 16:43
Quoting MidwesTom:
More than 3 Billion people, of the world's 7 Billion earn less than $2.00 per day. Any pay above that is appreciated in these desperately poor generally overcrowd countries. It appears evil to us, but any paying work is appreciated there.


Damned Skippy -

Just like the African agricultural Slaves of the United States from the 1600s to the mid 1800s, these people simply *love* to be kept in chains (physical and economic).

The fact that someone, somewhere in the world *will* take a job at 5 cents a day due to extreme hardship does not make that phenomenon an "equitable arrangement".

So much for the modern apologists for chattel slavery.
 
 
+24 # jazzman633 2014-09-10 10:22
reiver, I couldn't agree more.

Something very important is being lost. Call it respect, human interaction, the courtesy of attention, or the ability to sustain a simple conversation). Every year I get more creeped out by the growing dependence on these devices -- so far advanced now that people risk their very lives behind the wheel, just to check their stupid email.

Emerson wrote "You own a cow; the cow owns you." He would be amazed to see whole rooms full of people staring at their little screens. As one tech writer said, "We are all Jobs' slaves now." Not me.

I have a flip phone that I use for phone calls and an occasional photo. Sometimes the built-in flashlight comes in handy.
 
 
+4 # reiverpacific 2014-09-10 16:53
Quoting jazzman633:
reiver, I couldn't agree more.

Something very important is being lost. Call it respect, human interaction, the courtesy of attention, or the ability to sustain a simple conversation). Every year I get more creeped out by the growing dependence on these devices -- so far advanced now that people risk their very lives behind the wheel, just to check their stupid email.

Emerson wrote "You own a cow; the cow owns you." He would be amazed to see whole rooms full of people staring at their little screens. As one tech writer said, "We are all Jobs' slaves now." Not me.

I have a flip phone that I use for phone calls and an occasional photo. Sometimes the built-in flashlight comes in handy.

I dig Jazz bro': my wife and I share a "Smart" phone -and it's too damn smart for me. We only use it on trips.
All that stuff it does gives me brain damage just looking at the screen!
"♫ Give me the simple life ♫♪"!
 
 
+11 # vmricks 2014-09-10 11:08
Yes, the Apple workers and electronic workers worldwide are exploited. Did you know that the US economic practices (for all workers) are based on practices initiated and honed during and since the Transatlantic Slave Trade (1444-1888)? This is a forbidden topic. Until workers worldwide, regardless of ethnic group, understand ourselves as their disposable cargo, nothing will change. The European Oligarchy (yes, the infamous .01%) figured out then how to use 5 continents to hide their mischief and collect their profits. The details may change, but the process is 500 years old. For more on this subject read Through the Lens of the Transatlantic Slave Trade (2013) or follow my blog, www.honoringtheheart.com. Vinita Ricks
 
 
+21 # Anarchist 23 2014-09-10 11:27
We no longer live int he country that triumphed at the end of World War II, that advertised itself as the land of freedom and democracy. We now live in a Fascist Theocratic Oligarchy of the Plutocracy and we are nothing but colonized people..of course most don't realize it because they have cell phones, McDonald's and 150 channels of dreck on their TV...something which used to be free but now costs a large chunk of change. Remember the Borg from Star Trek 2nd Generation? Are you assimilated? No TV, no cell phone for me...and my computer is practically 10 years old! Meanwhile, you can wonder how long it will be until a big corporation which pays not taxes comes for your water, your land, your mountain...or leaves you town empty and dying when it off-shores its production and your local economy!PS...ch eck the cause of death statistics for this country and see how well the internal war is going against you, the populace!
 
 
+14 # Johnny 2014-09-10 13:31
The capitalists pretty much have us by the balls. Intel is in nearly every electronic gizmo, so you can't boycott it without giving up your computers. And because they own the media through which most Americans get their world view, they have brainwashed most American workers to accept wage slavery in return for Sunday afternoon football on television.
 
 
-9 # HiHho 2014-09-10 14:12
Oh, Please!

The logical extension of this theory is that RSN is guilty of the same thing by making content so powerful that readers want to access it from their smartphones.
 
 
-1 # reiverpacific 2014-09-10 15:55
Quoting HiHho:
Oh, Please!

The logical extension of this theory is that RSN is guilty of the same thing by making content so powerful that readers want to access it from their smartphones.


Eh????
In Planet Earth-based English purty-puleeze.
 
 
-4 # HiHho 2014-09-11 13:08
I asked 7 readers who I consider to Progressives and none of them had any problem in understanding the post. In fact, number 6 stated that the meaning should be easily understood by any Progressive intellectual.
 
 
+6 # macky 2014-09-10 15:21
the spirit of compassion needs to be taught to every beating heart in the world. this can be accomplished
 
 
-6 # RLF 2014-09-10 18:07
I feel really bad for the Americans who's jobs were sent overseas to this Chinese factory because they were so successful fighting for the right to be treated decently at work. I don't really care about the Chinese workers until they care about themselves. Until they fight for their own rights as employes they will be treated badly and the person who's job they took will continue to be pressured to take Chinese wages!

Charity begins at home!
 
 
-2 # backwards_cinderella 2014-09-11 04:14
whose jobs ...
 
 
-2 # macky 2014-09-10 15:23
the bad would be stopped.then these things won't
happen
 
 
-10 # andeqoo 2014-09-10 17:45
PAUSE.

Use a grammar checker if you want to be taken seriously as a writer.

The iPhone6 is coming out soon


. But you don’t need one.
sentence fragment.

Your
You're.

lining up to buy Apple’s latest product is enabling their abuse of workers around the world, including in the United States.

Step your game up.

Sincerely,

Every English teacher you've ever had.
 
 
-4 # RLF 2014-09-10 18:11
Do you think that buying any product produced in any number of third world countries doesn't create abused workers? Wake up...they will stop being abused when THEY fix their government...an d we'll stop being abused when we fix ours. A bunch of spoiled brats that feel like they have to have the latest stupid gadgets, no matter what they be, contribute...li ke the computer, phone, tablet you wrote the above on.
 
 
+4 # reiverpacific 2014-09-11 15:17
Quoting RLF:
Do you think that buying any product produced in any number of third world countries doesn't create abused workers? Wake up...they will stop being abused when THEY fix their government...and we'll stop being abused when we fix ours. A bunch of spoiled brats that feel like they have to have the latest stupid gadgets, no matter what they be, contribute...like the computer, phone, tablet you wrote the above on.


Stupid, ignorant comment.
Have you ever been to any of these African nations, China, Indonesia, Korea, Bangladesh or anywhere else that base quite a chunk of their economy on sweatshop labor and seen what the odds are against them "Doing anything" against their hard-ass, bloody-minded, corrupt, military-domina ted governments -most of which have "Most favored Nation" status with the good ol' US which is possibly their largest consumer base AND which it's Military/Corpor ate behemoth of a death-industry has most likely sold their government arms to keep them in their places too.
I've often been gobsmacked by people who have shitty low-paying jobs HERE sending me an email self-identified as "From my iPhone"; they're hardly cheap.
Wake up yourself!
 
 
-2 # RLF 2014-09-12 05:44
And the US government is not militarized at all...it will be simple for us to change our own government? The only way the 'free market' works for a developed country is when all of the others come up to them or they go down to the others. Horse sense...and I'm not willing to go down to Chinese wages...how about you Reiver???

You comment is knee jerk supposed liberalism...bu t just knee jerk!
 
 
+2 # reiverpacific 2014-09-12 10:34
Quoting RLF:
And the US government is not militarized at all...it will be simple for us to change our own government? The only way the 'free market' works for a developed country is when all of the others come up to them or they go down to the others. Horse sense...and I'm not willing to go down to Chinese wages...how about you Reiver???

You comment is knee jerk supposed liberalism...but just knee jerk!


"Knee-jerk"?
One of the favorite expressions of reactionary ignoramuses who've never been around much and limited themselves to a small box.
I've SEEN this shit first hand, in MANY countries.
Try reading the post again, especially the bit about the US Corporate/Milit ary behemoth by arming and trading with their rulers; that's how they "Go down" to them and reward their corruption.
You completely missed the point of my statement so "Avaunt and quit my sight---".
BTW, I'm not a "Liberal' -I'm a full-blown Socialist!
 
 
0 # RLF 2014-09-12 13:58
And I would consider myself a socialist as well. When the poor abused Chinese workers organize for better working conditions, then I have their back...until then I'll work on import duties and taxes on corp. profits. As for militarized governments...I think the Chinese produce plenty of that themselves. The people killed in this countrie's fight for worker rights were killed by non-government Pinkertons and private armies but we still got it done.
 
 
+12 # CarlGibson 2014-09-11 06:46
My use of "your" vs. "you're" is actually correct in this instance, and my proofreader backs me up on this. "You're" is a contraction for "you are," and saying "you are...is enabling" is grammatically incorrect. But thanks for being a grammar nazi. I hope it made you feel important for a second.

Also, a fun fact: the guy who proofread Hitler's speeches was a grammar nazi.
 
 
+3 # reiverpacific 2014-09-11 15:20
Quoting CarlGibson:
My use of "your" vs. "you're" is actually correct in this instance, and my proofreader backs me up on this. "You're" is a contraction for "you are," and saying "you are...is enabling" is grammatically incorrect. But thanks for being a grammar nazi. I hope it made you feel important for a second.

Also, a fun fact: the guy who proofread Hitler's speeches was a grammar nazi.


Heh-heh!
Good retort-sharpish to somebody who must be a Helluva lotta fun to be around.
We get 'em from time to time on RSN.
 
 
+4 # Ledya 2014-09-11 15:16
I think you're mistaken. The sentence "Your lining up to buy Apple's latest product is enabling their abuse of workers around the world, including the United States" makes correct use of the word 'your'. I see Mr. Gibson himself has corrected you on this. Perhaps you should consider the message of the article rather than look to point out the nonexistent grammatical errors. English teachers also do that, right? Analyze content?
 
 
0 # rhgreen 2014-09-10 19:37
I'm guessing that a Blackberry would be better. (I have a BB Torch.) They used to be made in Waterloo Ontario under Ontario and Canadian labour laws, which are probably more stringent than in the US. Now, with BB struggling back, I suspect that more of the materials and labour are 3rd world. But even so I'm guessing that a BB product is less abusive of workers than an Apple product.
 
 
+4 # Jwood 2014-09-11 00:52
I agree that all these large companies do a very poor job of paying and caring for their lower-tier workers correctly. But c'mon, you can't really put the abuse American workers suffer in the same category as that of the Asian and African worker. I would much rather be "hawking" about Apple's products than working at a mine or a factory with what are truly poor conditions. So although I think work should be done here in the US to improve conditions, I feel that places like Africa, Asia and even South America are in a more dire need for help. They may not share your nationality, but the fight should instead be for the humanist effort.
 
 
+3 # Ledya 2014-09-11 15:59
I appreciate your opinion and how well it was stated, and to some extent, I agree. However, we must be just as willing to stand up for the rights of low income workers here is Canada or the U.S. to autonomy and human dignity as we are for those in the "second" or "third world". No matter where you live, you should be able to access fair and adequate work and wages so that you can support yourself. Western poverty is just as legitimate as poverty elsewhere and although it might not be as dire, we shouldn't ignore or belittle it.
 
 
0 # topernic 2014-09-12 09:53
You don't get it. There is no 'right' way or 'fair' way. Reread the Louis CK quote at the beginning. It is not a joke if you are serious about the way things work.
 
 
0 # papillon 2014-09-14 14:05
people who want their fancy, unnecessary, stupidity-encou raging devices should have to gather the materials and construct them themselves. then those who had them would actually deserve them. and if nobody's willing, so what? the world would be better off.
apple tech support advisors in the u.s. only make minimum wage, though their supervisors dangle the carrot of bonus pay over their noses but fail to pay out if the advisors get a negative (or neutral!) customer survey that wasn't even about that particular advisor... or if the advisor's average call time isn't 10-12 minutes.
 
 
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