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In a recent Twitter post Libertarian firebrand Rep. Ron Paul wrote: "In a free society, we are supposed to know the truth," he wrote. "In a society where truth becomes treason, we are in big trouble."

Congressman Ron Paul on the presidential campaign trail in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, 01/10/08. (photo: Eric Thayer/Getty Images)
Congressman Ron Paul on the presidential campaign trail in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, 01/10/08. (photo: Eric Thayer/Getty Images)




Ron Paul: What We Need Is More WikiLeaks

By Stephen C. Webster, Reader Supported News

07 December 10

Reader Supported News | Report



Petition in Support of Julian Assange

Also See:
WikiLeaks' Twitter Page: http://twitter.com/wikileaks
WikiLeaks' Support Page: http://wikileaks.ch/support.html
Lieberman Attacks New York Times Over WikiLeaks Documents: http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/dec/07/wikileaks-joe-lieberman-new-york-times-investigated


exas Republican Congressman Ron Paul is no stranger to breaking with his party, but in a recent television appearance the libertarian-leaning Rep. went even further than any member of Congress in defending whistleblower website WikiLeaks.

Speaking to Fox Business host Judge Napolitano on Thursday about recent revelations at the Federal Reserve, Paul's typical candor showed through.

"What we need is more WikiLeaks about the Federal Reserve," he said. "Can you imagine what it'd be like if we had every conversation in the last 10 years with our Federal Reserve people, the Federal Reserve chairman, with all the central bankers of the world and every agreement or quid-pro-quo they have? It would be massive. People would be so outraged."

Paul, a longtime critic of the US Federal Reserve, is the incoming chairman of a House subcommittee on monetary policy. His most recent book, titled "End the Fed," takes aim at central banks the world over, blaming fiat money systems and fractional reserve banking for the world's increasingly volatile economies.

"In a free society we're supposed to know the truth," Paul insisted. "In a society where truth becomes treason, then we're in big trouble. And now, people who are revealing the truth are getting into trouble for it.

He added: "This whole notion that Assange, who's an Australian, that we want to prosecute him for treason - I mean, aren't they jumping to a wild conclusion? [...] I mean, why don't we prosecute The New York Times or anybody that releases this?"

The Texas congressman echoed his message from Fox Business in a twitter post early Friday.

"In a free society, we are supposed to know the truth," he wrote. "In a society where truth becomes treason, we are in big trouble."

Many Republicans have called for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, an Australian, to be prosecuted under the US Espionage Act, or for his site to be deemed a "foreign terrorist organization." The Department of Justice said it was looking into who leaked the massive caches of documents to Assange and whether or not he could be prosecuted.

The site experienced a series of domain take-downs by mid-day Friday, but was back online via an IP address, with mirrors popping up across Europe.

Data released by the Federal Reserve on Wednesday showed that foreign banks were among the biggest recipients of some $3.3 trillion in emergency loans offered by the US central bank amid the 2008 financial crisis.

More than $290 billion worth of mortgage securities were sold to Deutsche Bank, a German lender. Credit Suisse, a Swiss bank, got more than $287 billion in mortgage bonds. Corporations like Caterpillar, General Electric, Harley Davidson, McDonald's, Verizon and Toyota also relied the programs.

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-67 # Shirley Johansen 2010-12-07 23:02
My question for Congressman Paul is does he think it would be acceptable for someone to hack into and then release his professional correspondence? Wanting more transparency and condoning illegal acts are two very different things!
 
 
+61 # banichi 2010-12-07 23:34
What is illegal about the leak? That is the first question! Just because so many are calling it treason (Assange is an Australian, so it is not treason) doesn't make it so. And comparing the exposure of secretive, underhanded, and even illegal correspondence by diplomats can not be compared to the Congressman's personal correspondence. Get real! Assange broke no laws, just exposed the truth!
 
 
+40 # Paul Brodie 2010-12-08 00:07
Assange did not hack into anything. In fact, no one hacked into anything. He was the recipient of information downloaded by an American citizen who had legal access to the information, if not the right to disseminate it to anyone else. At least try to have your facts straight before making ridiculous statements.
 
 
+39 # Carioca 2010-12-08 01:06
Mark Twain said if you always tell the truth, you never have to remember what you said.
 
 
+7 # David H 2010-12-09 10:26
Quoting Carioca:
Mark Twain said if you always tell the truth, you never have to remember what you said.

Twain also said, "A lie can travel halfway around the world while the truth is still putting on its shoes."
 
 
+28 # T Matelson 2010-12-08 08:32
Transparency and Illegal acts need to be connected or criminal behavior reigns. Harsh, but true. I imagine that Ron Paul takes responsibility for what he says and writes so that if his correspondence became public he'd say "yeah" ... I think that, I said that, I did that, and I take responsibility for that. That's the kind of government we need. Otherwise, we have government who do for themselves at our expense, rather than working for the benefit of us, the public. Which would you rather have? I vote for holding leaders responsibile for actions and WORDS even behind the scenes.
 
 
+23 # Sammy 2010-12-08 08:43
I've been following Wikileaks for a while now and I'm fairly certain it's clear that the only thing JA did was publish information given to him. This is not a crime.
 
 
+7 # geraldom 2010-12-08 11:59
Quoting Sammy:
I've been following Wikileaks for a while now and I'm fairly certain it's clear that the only thing JA did was publish information given to him. This is not a crime.


The Obama administration and his "Roberto Gonzales", Eric Holder, realize that it will be difficult to prosecute him for espionage, even though they still may try if they can get his hands on him, and they just might if either the UK and/or Sweden allow his extradition to the United States. But, if that doesn't work out, they plan on charging him with possession of stolen U.S. property. They'll figure something out. They're very good at that, and, if you haven't noticed, the U.S. is very good these days at setting up Kangaroo courts to almost guarantee a conviction. If the U.S. can get physical possession of Assange, and even if he's convicted on the most minor charge, they will find a way to put him in prison for life without parole.

Assange was foolish to allow himself to be arrested in Britain. If I had been him, I would have found some safe haven to go to rather than allow this travesty of justice to play out to its inevitable end.
 
 
+9 # Sam Williams 2010-12-08 10:56
You can be sure US government agents have 'hacked into" Ron Paul's correspondence - and will release it if that satisfies political objectives. Probably yours, too - despite that quaint Amendment IV of the US constitution. Publishing evidence of wrongdoing is covered in the First Amendment.
 
 
+3 # Marivus 2010-12-08 20:29
Quoting Shirley Johansen:
My question for Congressman Paul is does he think it would be acceptable for someone to hack into and then release his professional correspondence? Wanting more transparency and condoning illegal acts are two very different things!

WikiLeaks did not hack into anything. They are only reporting on the info given them, exactly like the New York Times and others did.
 
 
-1 # truth whisperer 2010-12-11 07:23
Quoting Shirley Johansen:
My question for Congressman Paul is does he think it would be acceptable for someone to hack into and then release his professional correspondence? Wanting more transparency and condoning illegal acts are two very different things!


OMG you are so ignorant and probably ugly. Everything governments and its elacted reps say or do must be known to the public. If this is not possible because some people oppose release it means that those people are doing things that cannot bare the light nof day, and as far as I know governments aren't to function in that manner. If somebody has nothing dirty to hide why not go for 100% transparancy, especially in the case of governments and political parties WHICH ARE THERE TO SERVE THE PEOPLE, NOT TO MISLEAD THEM. Ron Paul is the only sane person in US politics, I think he is one of the few with nothing to hide. But that's just a gues. We should know everything about everybody in politics, that is the essence of democracy, did you forget? And if you are doning things that people aren't supposed to know, you should have your arse fired! That is how a normal society works, but that's a utopia.
 
 
+46 # donna 2010-12-07 23:05
WOW Ron, I am impressed. Finally a voice of reason.
 
 
+9 # Chiniquy 2010-12-08 09:30
Congressman Ron Paul has been like this for many, many years.
 
 
+21 # adarasmum 2010-12-08 00:05
"In a free society, we are supposed to know the truth," he wrote. "In a society where truth becomes treason, we are in big trouble."

and here we are. It's 1984, oh, I mean 2010.

Hacking into people's correspondence?
Do you honestly believe that there is such a thing as safety, on the Internet?

What's good for the goose is good for the gander, and there is nothing to fear, if you are not guilty of unethical behaviour.

That goes for this Congressman too.
 
 
-25 # J D MATTHEWS 2010-12-08 00:31
The truth according to Who. I have heard ab out all I need to from radicals
who declare anything they say as the truth and anything someone who disagrees with them as a lie. Ron Paul
if taken literally wants to end Civil Rights Legleslation, Public School, SS,
Gurantees of penison plans among a multitude of other programs. Remember only defense and Diplomacy and all other Government
programs gone.
 
 
+18 # genierae 2010-12-08 08:20
JD Matthews: You don't have to agree with Ron Paul's politics to agree with his statement concerning WikiLeaks and Assange. Even Republicans speak the truth once in a while, and Ron Paul is one of their most truthful members.
 
 
+14 # T Matelson 2010-12-08 08:41
. . . Not to confuse RON with RAND......
very different shades of a "libertarian" perspective ....
 
 
+6 # Philip Eggers 2010-12-08 12:42
I have usually admired Ron Paul because he is always out front on what he believes. You are right, he would probably end those things if he could. I would never vote for him because I'm a liberal and I believe all those issues are important.
I don't think he has ever called those called anyone a liar who disagrees with him. I think he's an honest guy with whom I almost totally disagree.
 
 
+18 # giraffe 2010-12-08 02:32
With OBAMA's deal with the Republicans today 12/7/2010 - much is being released bout our debts going back decades. These have been hidden -- we have deals with Iran even. We are going down because of all these secrets. We have no democracy if elections are funded by unknown money (thank you USSC) and other secret deals + why aren't the Republicans in jail? Treason has something to do with a public elected official not being truthful. Well here we go - 'NOT EVERYONE WHO MAKES MORE THAN $250K can hire people' so THE REQUEST FOR TAX BREAKS TO CREATE JOBS IS A LIE.

I think the Congress will explode in the next 3 weeks or by the first 3 weeks after the newly elected are seated. Sarah will take care of them with one of her ill-informed mandates - like the one on Kennedy.

Wikileaks did not hack into anyone's files -- they were left unattended for anyone to see. I'm sure the Chinese have seen all of them since it is now known they have hacked into our banks, government - etc.

There are many competent unemployed programmers -- the US Government should have hired a few to seal their secrets -- too late. Now we demand transparency and will get it
 
 
+24 # Ralph Averill 2010-12-08 02:58
Ron Paul has brought up a point no one except Mr. Assange has made. If Wikileaks and Assange are guilty of a crime, aren't the NY Times, the Guardian, Le Monde, Der Spiegal, et al guilty of the same crime? No one has called for their editorial boards to be "taken out" in a black ops raid.
 
 
+18 # John McAlpin 2010-12-08 05:32
Any hero of our time must be an enemy of the people
who rule us!
 
 
+2 # Rev St Claire 2010-12-09 12:32
Thats right John I remember an old saying by WWII bomber pilots "You know your not over the target if your not catching Flak"
We'll I think Mr. Assange is right on target.
 
 
+24 # antineocon 2010-12-08 05:39
Ron Paul has the right take. I never agreed with most of his policies but on this one he is on the mark. Keep it up
 
 
+9 # goodsensecynic 2010-12-08 06:09
Yes, Rep. Paul is a strange sort of fellow, but no one can say as much as he does without occasionally getting something right.

The question for political theorists is: "How much transparency can American government tolerate?" Or, more generally, "How much openness can a liberal democracy tolerate?"

The extant case will not likely become a major event in constitutional, criminal or even civil law. Despite all the anguish about "treason" on the right and all the talk about "shocking" revelations on the left, nothing much was made public that we didn't already know (though some of it was expressed in sillier language than we might have expected).

If any of this gets to the civilian courts, the question will (or should) boil down to this: "What violation of what statute was actually broken, if any?"

Meantime, the important issue concerns administrative punishments already being meted out: "Has the 14th Amendment become Constitutional collateral damage?"
 
 
+3 # giraffe 2010-12-08 19:08
I heard l U.S. government hired lawyer on C-Span the morning 12/8/2010 - state that the US law-makers are "making a law" if they cannot find one to charge WikiLeaks - And he assumed it would apply -- I screamed at my TV (retroactive lawyering is not the standard - but got no answer. Anybody know?_
 
 
+5 # Richard Stands 2010-12-08 22:25
Article 1, Section 9:
"No Bill of Attainder or ex post facto Law shall be passed."
 
 
-17 # CAM 2010-12-08 06:41
Actually, the Espionage Act of 1917 makes it a felony for an unauthorized person to POSSESS or TRANSMIT information relating to the national defense, which information the possesor has reason to believe could be used to the injury of the United States or to the advantage of any foreign nation. Both Assange and the person who helped him to obtain this information are guilty.
 
 
+5 # Creighton 2010-12-08 17:08
How old were you in 1917? Live in antiquity if you want.
 
 
+1 # Richard Stands 2010-12-08 22:29
New York Times Co. v. United States in 1971 supersedes the Espionage Act.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_Times_Co._v._United_States
 
 
+2 # Mike J 2010-12-11 19:36
The Espionage Act of 1917 was/is a law which would make any neo-con drool. It basically says, if you don't agree with the government, you're guilty of a felony. It was used widely to incarcerate even religious conscientious objectors to war (Mennonites, Church of the Brethren, Quakers, Jehovah's Witnesses, Assembly of God, and others). It is past time for it to be dustbinned!
 
 
+4 # afly 2010-12-08 06:43
You guys could of had Ron as your president.

What a shame!
 
 
+14 # Paddy 2010-12-08 06:48
My grand-father was officially a terrorist.
He was a French resistant and he was deported to Buchenwald in 1943. The black triangle on his pajama meant just that: terrorist.
 
 
+13 # lee nason 2010-12-08 07:20
Shirley Johansen's question deserves an answer. I am certain the Dr. Paul would think it a serious privacy assault if someone hacked into and publicized his personal correspondence. But what happened with Manning and Assange is quite different: they hacked into and published the details of business paid for by American taxpayers. This information is bought and paid for by us. We have a natural right to see it and vote accordingly. Individual citizens have a natural right to privacy but taxpayer funded governments have no such natural right.

Manning should, of course, be prosecuted for violating his oath to maintain confidentiality . But the trumped up sex charges against Assange should be dismissed by all reasonable people and we have no right to prosecute him for publishing newsworthy material.

This position may make us uncomfortable but standing up for justice is often uncomfortable.

Lee Nason
 
 
+11 # Commander Zero 2010-12-08 07:53
It is illegal to classify material for political reasons, yet most of the material released by Wikileaks was classified for political reasons.
We know who is the real crimnal.
 
 
+12 # Gordon Berry 2010-12-08 08:19
Good for Ron Paul -
and how about Obama's secret discussions with the republicans when he gave away all the help we need for people earning less than $250,000 per year? We need a transcript of those ugly dealings revealed immediately.
Mr. Obama - you have lost my vote...
 
 
+9 # C.P. 2010-12-08 08:59
Since Assange is Australian, it is dumb to consider his alleged crimes are treasonous to the United States. Besides, he has committed no crime for revealing these cables. His other problem related to alleged sexual advanceds on women are also very suspect. One woman protests because she wanted to use a condom and he did not. Another claims he had sex with her while she was asleep. Really? When did she wake up? Such goofy claims. Real rape is traumatic, not consensual.
 
 
+16 # Chiniquy 2010-12-08 09:40
For the past 100 years or so, our so-called leaders have treated us like mushroom. They keep us in the dark and feed us sh.t

They given us a rosy picture about how American is trying to help other nations around the world but the truth is that we have been taking advantage of them and their natural resources for the benefit of our corporations.

Remember the lie former President Bush told when he said that people around the world hated us because of our freedom and democracy.

The real reason they hate us, is because our foreign policy is hypocritical.
 
 
+12 # xenos 2010-12-08 11:04
GOOD for Paul! Screw Lieberman & all of the fear mongers who hate freedom. Let it out, let it all out. TRY our corrupt leaders, free Assange & call him a hero.
 
 
+4 # futhark 2010-12-08 14:07
Nice to see a politician who is acquainted with the philosophical principles on which our form of government was supposed to be founded and who is not afraid to speak the truth. If only the press had given him the coverage he deserves when he ran for president in 2008, instead of focusing on the phony "hope" and "change" guy and all the other lackeys of the plutocrat oligarchy...
 
 
-4 # Vikingskipper 2010-12-08 14:59
Under Espionage Act of 1917 someone who publishes classified US Government documents with the INTENT to do harm may be prosecuted for treason. Julian comes awfully close to qualifying if you read his public comments about his intent.
 
 
+3 # KevinFarr 2010-12-10 16:53
Quoting Vikingskipper:
Under Espionage Act of 1917 someone who publishes classified US Government documents with the INTENT to do harm may be prosecuted for treason. Julian comes awfully close to qualifying if you read his public comments about his intent.


Color me ignorant, but how can you apply an American federal law against a foreign national living overseas? Would they not need to take advantage of an extant law with international jurisdiction?
 
 
+9 # ivyleigh 2010-12-08 20:34
Was anyone prosecuted for "outing" Valerie Plame? That was certainly a security breach with "intent to do harm" .....The federal government makes it up as they go along to suit themselves.
 
 
+3 # soularddave 2010-12-08 23:24
Vastly more damage was done by those who CONSPIRED to 'out' vallerie Plame, who worked for our "intellegence' agencies. The 'outing' was strictly a political act to punish her husband for his own "wicked leak' of the truth about the phony reason for invading Iraq.

Funny how the New York Times always seems to publish *what THEY say* and what we need to know. The beauty of RSN is that we get to talk about all "that stuff" as we reach our own conclusions.
 

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