RSN Fundraising Banner
FB Share
Email This Page
add comment
Print

Excerpt: "Dozens of tribal members from several Native American nations took to horseback on Friday to protest the proposed construction of an oil pipeline which would cross the Missouri river just yards from tribal lands in North Dakota."

Dozens of tribal members from several Native American nations took to horseback on Friday to protest against the proposed construction of an oil pipeline in North Dakota. (photo: Megan Mitchell/NBC)
Dozens of tribal members from several Native American nations took to horseback on Friday to protest against the proposed construction of an oil pipeline in North Dakota. (photo: Megan Mitchell/NBC)


Native American Nations Unite to Ride Against Proposed North Dakota Pipeline

By Nicky Woolf, Raw Story

02 April 16

 

bout 200 people rode on horseback to protest against pipeline that encroaches on tribal lands and could pollute Missouri river: ‘We’re looking out for all people’

Dozens of tribal members from several Native American nations took to horseback on Friday to protest the proposed construction of an oil pipeline which would cross the Missouri river just yards from tribal lands in North Dakota.

The group of tribal members, which numbered around 200, according to a tribal spokesman, said they were worried that the Dakota Access Pipeline, proposed by a subsidiary of the Dallas, Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners, would lead to contamination of the river. The proposed route also passes through lands of historical significance to the Standing Rock Lakota Sioux Nation, including burial grounds.

“They’re going under the river 500 yards from my son’s grave, my father’s grave, my aunt who I buried last week,” said Ladonna Allard, a member of the Standing Rock nation and the closest landowner to the proposed pipeline. “I really love my land, and if that pipeline breaks everything is gone.”

“We must fight every inch of our lives to protect the water,” Allard said.

A “spiritual camp” will be set up starting Saturday at the point where the proposed pipeline would cross the river, and the tribal members plan to stay and protest indefinitely.

The group is composed of members of the Standing Rock nation as well as others from North and South Dakota nations, including the Cheyenne River Lakota and the Rosebud Sioux. They joined together to ride, run and walk from the Tribal Administration Building north to Cannonball, North Dakota, on the reservation’s northern edge.

The Missouri river is the primary source of drinking water for the tribal reservation, according to Doug Crow Ghost, a spokesperson for the Standing Rock Sioux and the director of the tribe’s water office, who joined the protest on Friday. Tribal members also fish in the river, he said.

“Because we are going to be fighting this giant, all the rest of the nations came on horseback to say ‘we support you’,” said Allard. “That is why this horse ride is so important to us. Because we’re not alone in this fight. All of our nations are coming to stand with us, and all our allies and partners. This pipeline is illegal.”

The pipeline is currently waiting on a decision from a colonel in the Army Corps of Engineers, who oversees such projects, on whether Dakota Access will be granted a permit to proceed, according to Dallas Goldtooth, a Keep It In The Ground campaign organizer for the Indigenous Environmental Network. The tribes are petitioning for an environmental impact study, which has not at this point been done, into the pipeline.

Goldtooth is optimistic about the tribe’s chances of stopping the pipeline. “It infringes on the tribe’s water rights, which are guaranteed by treaties, and the protocols associated with those rights were not followed,” he said. “The tribes have a really strong standing-point on this issue and we’re confident that we’ll see a whole environmental impact study enacted.”

Energy Transfer Partners did not respond to a request for comment.

“Although we do live on a reservation, the land that [the Dakota Access pipeline is] going to be crossing is on original land that was given us by treaty,” said Dakota Kidder, a member of the Standing Rock nation. “This is where it gets people fired up when you talk about broken treaties.”

“Without water there is no life, and this is our main source,” Kidder added. “It’s not just our issue. Everybody downriver of us is going to be affected, all the way down to the Gulf of Mexico. We’re not just looking out for ourselves; we’re looking out for all people.”

e-max.it: your social media marketing partner
 

Comments   

A note of caution regarding our comment sections:

For months a stream of media reports have warned of coordinated propaganda efforts targeting political websites based in the U.S., particularly in the run-up to the 2016 presidential election.

We too were alarmed at the patterns we were, and still are, seeing. It is clear that the provocateurs are far more savvy, disciplined, and purposeful than anything we have ever experienced before.

It is also clear that we still have elements of the same activity in our article discussion forums at this time.

We have hosted and encouraged reader expression since the turn of the century. The comments of our readers are the most vibrant, best-used interactive feature at Reader Supported News. Accordingly, we are strongly resistant to interrupting those services.

It is, however, important to note that in all likelihood hardened operatives are attempting to shape the dialog our community seeks to engage in.

Adapt and overcome.

Marc Ash
Founder, Reader Supported News

 
+15 # tigerlillie 2016-04-02 19:35
Hope the FBI doesn't send in the tanks again.
 
 
+12 # NAVYVET 2016-04-02 22:28
I'm part Shawnee and proud of it. PLEASE, PLEASE, Mr. Goldtooth, don't count on greedy whites honoring old treaties!! Especially this administration.

Hello, Rosebud! I love you! Nobody would remember us, but on our honeymoon my husband and I spent some time there, sleeping in our tent and meeting and greeting terrific people by day. We were taken on a grand tour to observe, among other depressing things, dry land, bad housing and the "company store", where unhealthy food 'way outnumbered fresh fruit and veggies, and where prices were 3 times higher than in a Bismarck supermarket we'd stopped in. The bread was out of date, and nothing but white squishy bread was on the shelf. No wonder actor Jay Silverheels ("Tonto") said "Ugh!" so often. I expect he was reacting as we did to the contents of a reservation store. But water is even more vital. Give us a website and a way to petition and make our voices heard from far away!
 
 
+18 # dotlady 2016-04-02 23:23
Good luck with stopping the pipeline - there are thousands of people standing with you in spirit all over this country (and the world) who are trying to stop such pipelines coming for their water and homes.
 
 
+13 # treerapper 2016-04-03 07:46
All water is something's drinking water. Water is a treasure whether it's on land that is sacred to First Peoples or not. Water needs to be protected wherever it flows.

We have seen the disregard that the Extraction Industry and Governments have for water. This is not just a Native tradition fight - his has to be everyone's fight no matter where you live.
 
 
+11 # LarrySherk 2016-04-03 13:00
Bless the indomitability of our Native Americans! We tried to disappear that embarrassment, but these brave, indigenous people would not go away. In fact, they have long predicted that WE would go away. And here we are, manufacturing our own collapse as fast as possible.
 
 
0 # E-Mon 2016-04-06 01:01
I've often thought the perfect world would be one with the technology of the white race coupled with the red race's reverence for Mother Earth and the four elements.
 

THE NEW STREAMLINED RSN LOGIN PROCESS: Register once, then login and you are ready to comment. All you need is a Username and a Password of your choosing and you are free to comment whenever you like! Welcome to the Reader Supported News community.

RSNRSN