FB Share
Email This Page
add comment
Print

Sheridan reports: "People who ate canned soup for five days straight saw their urinary levels of the chemical bisphenol A spike 1,200 percent compared to those who ate fresh soup, US researchers said on Tuesday. The randomized study, described as 'one of the first to quantify BPA levels in humans after ingestion of canned foods,' was done by Harvard University researchers and appears in the Journal of the American Medical Association's November 23 issue."

Bisphenol A, used in the linings of many canned foods, was found in elevated levels in people who ate canned soup for five days, US researchers said. (photo: Monika Graff/UPI)
Bisphenol A, used in the linings of many canned foods, was found in elevated levels in people who ate canned soup for five days, US researchers said. (photo: Monika Graff/UPI)




Bisphenol A Spikes 1,200% After Eating Canned Soup

By Kerry Sheridan, Agence France-Presse

26 November 11

 

eople who ate canned soup for five days straight saw their urinary levels of the chemical bisphenol A spike 1,200 percent compared to those who ate fresh soup, US researchers said on Tuesday.

The randomized study, described as "one of the first to quantify BPA levels in humans after ingestion of canned foods," was done by Harvard University researchers and appears in the Journal of the American Medical Association's November 23 issue.

"We've known for a while that drinking beverages that have been stored in certain hard plastics can increase the amount of BPA in your body," said lead author Jenny Carwile, a doctoral student in the Department of Epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health.

"This study suggests that canned foods may be an even greater concern, especially given their wide use."

The chemical BPA is an endocrine disruptor that has been shown to interfere with reproductive development in animal studies at levels of 50 micrograms per kilogram of body weight and higher, though it remains uncertain if the same effects cross over to humans, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

This study did not measure BPA levels by micrograms per kilogram of body weight, but rather by micrograms per liter of urine, so a direct comparison to the EPA-cited danger level in animals was not possible.

However, previous studies have linked BPA at lower levels than those found in the Harvard study to cardiovascular disease, diabetes and obesity in humans, Carwile told AFP in an email.

BPA is found in the lining of canned foods, cash register receipts, dental fillings, some plastics and polycarbonate bottles marked with the number 7.

Seventy-five people took part in the study, eating a 12-ounce serving of either fresh or canned soup for five days in a row. They were advised not to otherwise alter their regular eating habits.

After a two-day break, the groups switched and ate the opposite type of canned soup.

A urine analysis showed the canned soup eaters had 1,221 percent higher levels of BPA than those who ate the fresh soup.

BPA is typically eliminated in the urine and so any spike is usually considered temporary. The researchers did not measure how long elevated BPA stayed in the body, saying more study would be needed to examine that question.

The US government's health and environmental agencies are considering whether "further action is needed to address human health risks resulting from non-food-packaging uses of BPA," according to the EPA.

France's Agency for Food Health Safety (Anses) in September called for tougher preventive measures, warning that even "low doses" of the chemical had had a "confirmed" effect on lab animals and a "suspected" effect on humans.

Preventing exposure to BPA among infants, pregnant or nursing women was a "priority goal," Anses said.

Meanwhile, the Harvard study authors said their findings should encourage people who eat a lot of canned foods to opt for fresh instead, and should serve as a red flag to manufacturers who use BPA to make cans.

"The magnitude of the rise in urinary BPA we observed after just one serving of soup was unexpected and may be of concern among individuals who regularly consume foods from cans or drink several canned beverages daily," said senior author Karin Michels.

"It may be advisable for manufacturers to consider eliminating BPA from can linings."

 

Comments   

We are concerned about a recent drift towards vitriol in the RSN Reader comments section. There is a fine line between moderation and censorship. No one likes a harsh or confrontational forum atmosphere. At the same time everyone wants to be able to express themselves freely. We'll start by encouraging good judgment. If that doesn't work we'll have to ramp up the moderation.

General guidelines: Avoid personal attacks on other forum members; Avoid remarks that are ethnically derogatory; Do not advocate violence, or any illegal activity.

Remember that making the world better begins with responsible action.

- The RSN Team

 
+35 # pernsey 2011-11-26 19:23
Um I wont be buying canned soup again anytime soon. Im working hard...not always successfully to eat better, this is down right scary as so many soups are now saying on their commercials they are healthy and claiming people lose weight by eating them. In my opinion, a lot of our food isnt very safe, Im working hard at just eating things that arent laced with tons of chemicals...lik e cactus pears and avacado's that are bringing me back to better health.

Canned soup or canned anything are officially off my shopping list and out of my diet!
 
 
+1 # KittatinyHawk 2011-11-27 12:23
Look for organic in veggies, fruits, soups.
I get Annie Chung dry soups and others, feel they are better source of veggies, just wish I could cut the salt out.

I am teaching my spouse to read labels as he just had heart attack. He said wow this takes a long time, I said before you know it, you know to by pass most. Funny how we pay more for the companies to save money, by their removing salt and sugar. They are paid to take the crap by products of cane, salt to put in food. Never had this as kid.
Good Luck
 
 
+13 # Obwon 2011-11-27 06:04
Oh great, many fast food outlets are serving genetically modified foods. Worse yet the FDA has ruled that these foods do not have to be labeled as such, so no one will know what they're eating.

This, even though we're often finding out later, that what was once thought to be safe, in fact was not! A "conspiracy theorist" would say that they're trying to depopulate the planet. If they did, they'd at least have logic on their side.
 
 
+13 # Andrew Hansen 2011-11-27 06:36
Good on ya pernsey. And beyond the BPA risk moving away from industrial canned goods improves more than just individual health. Find some more local foods, even do a little canning on your own. It isn't hard and can actually be social. Even better you can pass it (the food or the skill!) on to friends as a gift or the next generation if that is part of your life.
 
 
+10 # Glen 2011-11-27 06:56
An interesting book on the subject of plastic is Plastic by Susan Freinkel. She illustrates in her study not only the amount of plastic in the environment but how much of it most people come in contact with every day. The first day she recorded touching 196 items containing plastic.

We are surrounded by the stuff, like it or not so there is no surprise that so many thousands of people are developing all manner of health issues, some quite serious.
 
 
+7 # Erdajean 2011-11-27 10:34
Is the lethargy of thought and spirit in this country begotten by the diet of cheapest-possib le-ingredients, mass-produced for the poorest nutrition and the most profit, and sold to the beleaguered, broke and weary?
Back in the Depression most of us had gardens, chickens and sometimes a cow, even in town. (Wouldn't that go over great today in the no-clothesline gated havens?) Most of us had something to cook, right at hand, and no jobs to get in the way. The only bad food I remember from that time was when the community store introduced "store-bought" chili, that came in a roll like sausage. It was AWFUL.
Wrote recently to a mass producer of frozen dinners about their hideous product I had tried to consume. Their response was a coupon for another of the same. Much canned soup these days reminds me of the water in which dirty plates once were rinsed before washing. Food is probably the worst victim of the current Profit Over All religion. It doesn't even have to be deliberate, for its suspected result.
 
 
+2 # pernsey 2011-11-27 14:29
Quoting Erdajean:
Is the lethargy of thought and spirit in this country begotten by the diet of cheapest-possible-ingredients, mass-produced for the poorest nutrition and the most profit, and sold to the beleaguered, broke and weary?
Back in the Depression most of us had gardens, chickens and sometimes a cow, even in town. (Wouldn't that go over great today in the no-clothesline gated havens?) Most of us had something to cook, right at hand, and no jobs to get in the way. The only bad food I remember from that time was when the community store introduced "store-bought" chili, that came in a roll like sausage. It was AWFUL.
Wrote recently to a mass producer of frozen dinners about their hideous product I had tried to consume. Their response was a coupon for another of the same. Much canned soup these days reminds me of the water in which dirty plates once were rinsed before washing. Food is probably the worst victim of the current Profit Over All religion. It doesn't even have to be deliberate, for its suspected result.


The food is processed, carbs,and salt to the point of having no nutritional value, hence the reason we are plagued with obesity in this country. You eat, but your body craves more and more food trying to get some nutritional value and there is very little. I notice my mental attitude has improved with my change of diet also!
 
 
+7 # KittatinyHawk 2011-11-27 12:34
As I am sitting here, apples are peeled, sliced and sitting on a wood stove. In an hour, I will have no additive apple sauce.
I use all sorts of apples, I like Macs but I add a delicious for sugar.
When peaches, pears, in fact any fruit can become the most beautiful sauce just by pealing and putting in pot on low with a touch of liquid on bottom. Takes 20 minutes to 40...voila a sauce to savor, hide for yourself or put in sterilized jars as gifts (do it quick for bring to dinner or learn to freeze.) I say away from canning sweet sauces.
Tomatoes, chop in half, put in pot with liquid at bottom. Let them steam on low
when you see skin bubbling, remove from heat let cool. Peel of skins, put in compost, I feed to chickens. Tak your tomatoes and add what you like, peppers, garlic, fennel etc touch of sea salt and simmer on med/low for 20 minutes until bubbling. Add the spices or herbs you want, let bubble for at least another 5 minutes, remove from heat, let sit til room temp. If your is too watery, then carefully put on heat and cook at med until you see it thicken, must be watched. You now have a base for soup, sauce and look on web...ketchup
There are plenty of good recipes out there for stocks..takes some time yep, usually a good 10 to prep and ten to simmer. Next day the taste is better yet. You Did It.
 
 
+3 # Erdajean 2011-11-27 13:42
Love this, Kittatiny. Takes not much longer to cook your way than to wait in line at the Lardy-Lunch Drivethru.
Am grateful for your wood stove. The insurance company banned wood stoves and heaters where I live. No profit in 'em for Big Oil. All robbers and fiends work together, for the BAD of real people.
 
 
0 # punk 2011-11-27 13:18
i eat only highly processed, ready to eat 'foods' and i'm physically healthy - but i'm losing my mind. i'd rather die than cook and clean
 
 
+2 # Electricrailwaygod 2011-11-28 02:09
Excessive sodium (salt) and sugar in tinned gods (canned food) is a clever device of killing off the poor who can in most cases only afford this sort of crap. It is the "Zyklon-B Giftgas" of the 21st Century! (The food corporations had indeed learned from the Nazis)!

I seriously recommend at all costs to stay clear of any tinned goods, period!
 

THE NEW STREAMLINED RSN LOGIN PROCESS: Register once, then login and you are ready to comment. All you need is a Username and a Password of your choosing and you are free to comment whenever you like! Welcome to the Reader Supported News community.

RSNRSN