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Excerpt: "We are now dealing with a vast intelligence-industrial complex that is largely unaccountable to its citizens. This alarming, unchecked growth of the intelligence sector and the increasingly heavy reliance on subcontractors to carry out core intelligence tasks...have intensified since the 9/11attacks."


"Where oversight and accountability have failed, Snowden's leaks have opened up a vital public debate on our rights and privacy." (photo: Democracy In Action)


The NSA's Intelligence-Industrial Complex

By Valerie Plame Wilson, Joe Wilson, Guardian UK

24 June 13

 

Where oversight and accountability have failed, Snowden's leaks have opened up a vital public debate on our rights and privacy.

et's be absolutely clear about the news that the NSA collects massive amounts of information on US citizens - from emails, to telephone calls, to videos, under the Prism program and other Fisa court orders: this story has nothing to do with Edward Snowden. As interesting as his flight to Hong Kong might be, the pole-dancing girlfriend, and interviews from undisclosed locations, his fate is just a sideshow to the essential issues of national security versus constitutional guarantees of privacy, which his disclosures have surfaced in sharp relief.

Snowden will be hunted relentlessly and, when finally found, with glee, brought back to the US in handcuffs and severely punished. (If Private Bradley Manning's obscene conditions while incarcerated are any indication, it won't be pleasant for Snowden either, even while awaiting trial.) Snowden has already been the object of scorn and derision from the Washington establishment and mainstream media, but, once again, the focus is misplaced on the transiently shiny object. The relevant issue should be: what exactly is the US government doing in the people's name to "keep us safe" from terrorists?

Prism and other NSA data-mining programs might indeed be very effective in hunting and capturing actual terrorists, but we don't have enough information as a society to make that decision. Despite laudable efforts led by Senators Ron Wyden and Mark Udall to bring this to the public's attention that were continually thwarted by the administration because everything about this program was deemed "too secret", Congress could not even exercise its oversight responsibilities. The intelligence community and their friends on the Hill do not have a right to interpret our rights absent such a discussion.

The shock and surprise that Snowden exposed these secrets is hard to understand when over 1.4 million Americans hold "top secret" security clearances. When that many have access to sensitive information, is it really so difficult to envision a leak?

We are now dealing with a vast intelligence-industrial complex that is largely unaccountable to its citizens. This alarming, unchecked growth of the intelligence sector and the increasingly heavy reliance on subcontractors to carry out core intelligence tasks - now estimated to account for approximately 60% of the intelligence budget - have intensified since the 9/11 attacks and what was, arguably, our regrettable over-reaction to them.

The roots of this trend go back at least as far as the Reagan era, when the political right became obsessed with limiting government and denigrating those who worked for the public sector. It began a wave of privatization - because everything was held to be more "cost-efficient" when done by the private sector - and that only deepened with the political polarization following the election of 2000. As it turns out, the promises of cheaper, more efficient services were hollow, but inertia carried the day.

Today, the intelligence sector is so immense that no one person can manage, or even comprehend, its reach. When an operation in the field goes south, who would we prefer to try and correct the damage: a government employee whose loyalty belongs to his country (despite a modest salary), or the subcontractor who wants to ensure that his much fatter paycheck keeps coming?

Early polls of Americans about their privacy concerns that the government might be collecting metadata from phone calls and emails indicates that there is little alarm; there appears to be, in fact, an acceptance of or resignation to these practices. To date, there is no proof that the government has used this information to pursue and harass US citizens based on their political views. There are no J Edgar Hoover-like "enemy lists" ... yet. But it is not so difficult to envision a scenario where any of us has a link, via a friend of a friend, to someone on the terrorist watchlist. What then? You may have no idea who this person is, but a supercomputer in Fort Meade (or, soon, at the Utah Data Center near Salt Lake City) will have made this connection. And then you could have some explaining to do to an over-zealous prosecutor.

On this spying business, officials from Director of National Intelligence James Clapper to self-important senators are, in effect, telling Americans not to worry: it's not that big a deal, and "trust us" because they're keeping US citizens safe. This position must be turned on its head and opened up to a genuine discussion about the necessary, dynamic tension between security and privacy. As it now stands, these programs are ripe for abuse unless we establish ground rules and barriers between authentic national security interests and potential political chicanery.

The irony of former Vice-President Dick Cheney wringing his hands over the release of classified information is hard to watch. Cheney calls Snowden a traitor. Snowden may not be a hero, but the fact is that we owe him a debt of gratitude for finally bringing this question into the public square for the robust discussion it deserves.


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+33 # cordleycoit 2013-06-24 11:02
We who have been physically tortured for simply doing our jobs are aware of tation losing yet another war to the corprete state.he truth you speak to. By nineteen sixty three we could see the rot in the forest of national security. We listened to and attempted to report to a sleeping nation the misdeeds of the intelligence community. Not that most of the people in the information business were also on the government payroll, more that the majority did not want to hear the bad news. Mean while the spy masters were crushing whole cultures under the Iron Fist of market capitalism. The boot is implanted in out throats,brother s and sisters.
 
 
+43 # MsAnnaNOLA 2013-06-24 11:05
It is disingenuous to call for reform. This is blatantly illegal and unconstitutiona l. The people responsible should be prosecuted. The programs should be shut down.

This is not about terrorism. This is about blackmailing high government, judicial and political figures to control the government.

Please see whistle blower Russ Tice at boilingfrogspos t.com, they tapped Obama before he was in Congress. What other future officials are being tapped now and what will their information be used for? Democracy cannot work when officials are not free to vote their conscience on behalf of the people.

http://www.boilingfrogspost.com/2013/06/19/podcast-show-112-nsa-whistleblower-goes-on-record-reveals-new-information-names-culprits/
 
 
+11 # karenvista 2013-06-24 19:50
Thank you for reminding everyone to see Russ Tice's interview. He told us much more than Ed Snowden has so far.

I was called crazy today for telling a group what Russ Tice, who retired from the NSA, revealed.

It answers all your questions.

Don't miss it!!
 
 
+47 # Milarepa 2013-06-24 11:13
Sweden has had the so-called FRA surveillance law since July 2008, a sort of Swedish NSA Prism. It seems to have made absolutely no difference. I live in Stockholm and I'm not aware of a single prosecution based on material obtained through government snooping. That doesn't mean I trust their goodwill. Assange, Manning, now Snowden, have done the world a real service for showing what is really happening. They've brought us down to earth, into reality. All three are fighting for their lives against the NSA-USA moloch. They have shown that David can make Goliath wobble. The question now is: Is Goliath reformable? The answer is obvious: Of course not.
 
 
-14 # tabonsell 2013-06-24 15:33
And I have been trying to tell RSN readers the same thing for the past two weeks. No one has been harmed.

I have been trying to tell RSN fans the exact same thing that Plame and Wilson are saying in this essay.

I have tried to explain the many steps NSA goes through to protect you privacy, and there are at least six (and some time more than six). Try thinking about them.

1 computer eliminates all connections that are domestic.

2 computer eliminates all reference to connections not tied to terrorist territory, safe houses and keeps that showing unusual patterns.

3 NSA must get a warrant to intercept conversations and emails of those few remaining phone numbers or other identifying links.

4 computer scans handful of conversations and emails for key words or phrases. Correspondence not containing those keys are eliminated

5 the handful that are left are read or listened to by people who have gone through the most-strenuous background check and have proved their integrity to be above questioning.

6 any employe doing anything to break the trust, loses the top secret clearance and is terminated.

(wiretapping Obama was done by a criminal Bush administration, laws were soon rewritten)

Plame and Wilson are right to point to the Reagan-Bush mindset to see the problem is private-sector contractors, not dedicated agency personnel who adhere to the six protections above.

But, for telling truth to those in panic mode only brings attacks and contempt.
 
 
+13 # karenvista 2013-06-24 19:55
Do you work for the NSA in a position to know what you are talking about?

What is that position?

Do you know Russ Tice?

If not, why not?

Give us one reason to believe you.
 
 
-5 # tabonsell 2013-06-26 16:13
I told you before. I spent a few years at NSA as a member of the US Air Force Security Service and as a civilian while attending Georgetown University Graduate school of Government, where I obtained my expertise of the US constitution.

I know the type of people at NSA; RSN readers do not.

I know the intelligence and aptitude tests ones must pass to get into the business; others don't.

I know the background checks they must pass; you don't

I know NSA's mission; you don't.

I know the hurdles NSA goes over to protect your privacy; you don't. (they have been listed, but I see many who think they know it all can't understand them)

I know how easy it is to be fired for misconduct; you don't.

I know the trust and integrity an NSA employee must demonstrate; you don't.

I know that George E. Bush used NSA illegally; maybe you do, but you seem to think the same is going on now, even though the laws were rewritten after Bush's crime spree.
 
 
+6 # jamander4 2013-06-24 21:59
Reply to Tabonsell's 6 points

1. computer collects all available data. Computer targets some data. Stores all data for possible future use.

2. Computer stores all data and collates to find patterns. All data includes copies of phone calls, emails, internet search history, credit card records and data obtained from private data firms

3. NSA and other government actors need a warrant to intercept conversations only if they are going to use the intercepted conversations directly in court . Since this information can be used to initiate targeted killing a warrant is really not very significant where targeted killing is involved. And if the intercept isn't used directly?

4. computer scans millions and possibly billions of calls over time. All data obtained is stored for possible future use.

5. The huge number step 4 produces is ranked by computer. A small number are read by NSA employees. The remainder are stored for future use.

6. any employee doing anything to break the trust, loses the top secret clearance and is terminated. The problem with this is the trust means the trust of the employ
 
 
+5 # RLF 2013-06-25 05:51
And you know this how and by people you trust. Sadam had weapons of mass destruction too! Hook, line, and sinker baby...does it hurt?
 
 
-2 # RobertMStahl 2013-06-25 06:34
You are right, unfortunately. It is hard to understand how people are so willing to vote down before a study, even if the path to understanding is quite blocked. There is a hollowness in culture. Maybe you would do more good to present the path to your wisdom rather that the 'means to an end' which is totalitarian. In any event, you have this one statistic that is quite pertinent, and I will give you a thumb up.
 
 
+3 # MsAnnaNOLA 2013-06-25 09:24
Follow up interview with Russ Tice....

http://www.corbettreport.com/interview-685-russ-tice-reveals-the-truth-about-nsa-spying/

They are lying about minimization. It is a bold faced lie.
 
 
+1 # RobertMStahl 2013-06-25 06:53
The game, as disastrous as it is in the overall landscape, is what Saul Bellow called "fluency." You say over and over what your intent is, then that is what it becomes. It is, sort of, a Faustian contortionist game, ignoring the real 'make the world you live in' possibility to turn the laws of nature upside down, like paper gold in the derivatives marketplace.

In 2003, days, maybe hours, before the invasion of Iraq, the art piece in front of the IMAX theater in Birmingham, AL where I live was destroyed, and it was based on a phone call of mine where I told a friend that it contained the hope of 'purity' in evolution that was flailing for our invasion, a collective murder. I knew this technology for spying then, also.

After 'fixing' it many months later only because I asked if they had insurance, since then the artist's message has been denied running steam, or worse, flipped on its head at times.

Originally, it depicted universal scientific unity, a black marble obelisk with large square base and water flowing, then with vertical spire extending above to a height about 30 feet, also black marble and triangular, with steam emanating the whole vertical distance from all three vertices. In perfect "fluency" form, they replaced the steam with fire, absolutely sick. I have a picture I can send. But, this is the message that is coming through loud and clear, now, so unfortunate related to learning, or learning to learn as Gregory Bateson says. Be a step in time.
 
 
+35 # jwb110 2013-06-24 12:02
Once the Caesars took over the Roman Republic in order to protect the Empire. They then promised to return the Republic once the danger was passed. The Republic was never return and the Caesars ruled right down to the Fall of Rome.
 
 
+4 # RLF 2013-06-25 05:54
Since WWII the security apparatus has been telling us we don't need to know...they had our best interests at heart. It was BS then and it is BS now. They don't know what is good for us and never did...they are just all like Obama, went to Harvard and think they are smarter than people down on the farm that actually do shit!
 
 
+10 # Kootenay Coyote 2013-06-24 12:41
Delicious Irony from two in the heart of the fray.
 
 
+14 # AMLLLLL 2013-06-24 12:45
Agree, Milarepa. If there were to be some kind of reform, it would be more like a morphing, kind of like when the lovely people at Blackwater had to morph into a new company, Xe, after getting caught in reckless behavior and general assholeism. It looks dauntless trying to make our government more transparent and accountable. It is THEY who should be shaking in their boots, not we the people.
 
 
+7 # photonracer 2013-06-24 18:56
[quote name="AMLLLLL"] Agree, Milarepa. If there were to be some kind of reform, it would be more like a morphing, kind of like when the lovely people at Blackwater had to morph into a new company, Xe, after getting caught in reckless behavior and general assholeism.
OMG I love that new word "assholeism". In all sincerity, Thank you.
 
 
+24 # wleming 2013-06-24 12:52
remember what happened to ray bonner at the new york times when he wrote that el mozote had been the site of a massacre by u.s. trained forces: he was fired and replaced-- and reagen went on lying. been going on for a long time folks...
 
 
+38 # Annette Saint John Lawrence 2013-06-24 15:14
I think the a more relevant question is: What is anyone in our US government doing in the people's name to "keep us safe" from the CIA, National Security and the whole of the military industrial complex? They are the terrorists we need protection from.
 
 
+1 # Rita Walpole Ague 2013-06-25 09:58
Amen, sister Annette. Ready for two true stories re. the "...terrorists we need protection from."?

1. It took me a couple of days to gather up my courage and i.d. who it was in '08 who stood at the door and kept elected delegates and alternates standing out in the bitter cold, needlessly, for hours, and then sent some away, in an intimidating manner. I'd witnessed this firsthand, and replied who it was - an NSA agent, then head of the local Colo. Springs ACLU, on whose board I then served. Shortly thereafter, my 100% disabled vet brother and I experienced a middle of the night, very intimidating non-burgler break in, with our neighbor reporting same to local cops. Cops came that night (I slept through it), and next day, after learning from both my brother and our neighbor what had happened, I stopped at the local station to add to the police report what my brother had experienced. When the cop asked me if anyone was trying to threaten or intimidate me, I told him the NSA agent story. Cop's reply: My grandmother was at that assembly, and nearly froze in the cold. He then advised that I get as open and visible as possible on things, for much needed protection.

2. By accident, I heard two govt. agents discussing 'weather control satellites'. Verify these WCS'ers I have, including hearing from an inside source that any insider outing info. re. them will cause death v. mere firing.
 
 
+15 # wrodwell 2013-06-24 16:14
Overwhelming "security" has only one goal: to keep in power those who do not want their power curtailed by any means or by anyone. When the two Patriot Acts were voted into law, they were the equivalent of letting the Fox into the Henhouse - twice. How odd that President Obama recently informed us that the "global war on terror" will be winding down while conversely, domestic security data mining is experiencing a quantum leap up. Given this glaring contradiction, it's chillingly clear that the ultimate goal of our massive, secret surveillance system is to intimidate and control the greatest enemy of all - the American people. Woe to us if we let it happen.
 
 
+2 # Jack Gibson 2013-06-24 18:58
Sounds like the writing of true believers in "intelligence", in a so-called "constitutional republic" keeping important information from the people that it is important for them to know, and the writing of people who still put far too much faith in a now totally out of control government that wants to subjugate, oppress, "castrate the true liberty(ies) and freedom(s)" from, and repress us all. Thus, all of you pro-"intelligen ce", anti-true-liber ty-and-freedom, people make me sick.

In a truly, fully and completely free country and society, all such abusive, liberty-and-fre edom-violating- and-destroying evil is not allowed to exist. But your ilk have been so successfully brainwashed to believe in its so-called "necessity" that you can no longer see the true forest for the trees.

Ever since We the People allowed the creation of monstrosities like the "alphabet agencies", and the corruption of the others, it was just a matter of time before we were no longer a truly, fully and completely free nation. And, voila, that's exactly where we are today because we made the mistake as a people of blindly trusting government; as if there weren't plenty of history to more than sufficiently prove the absolute folly of that!

- Continued -
 
 
+3 # Jack Gibson 2013-06-25 00:16
So, all of you people who believe in the false so-called "rightness" of spying on other nations, and our own people, and who write about it, please go away. You are NOT true defenders of real liberty and freedom, regardless of what you say that is correct; and it is due to "compromisers with evil" like yourselves, that we are where we are now.
 
 
+8 # fredboy 2013-06-24 19:42
What is appalling is we as taxpayers are paying the clowns exorbitant amounts to spy on US! Yet most Americans let it happen, scared shitless to ever open their mouths.

I borrow the final line in the amazing play "A Good Man is Hard To Find" -- IS ANYONE OUT THERE BREATHING?
 
 
+7 # blizmo1 2013-06-24 21:06
Quoting fredboy:
What is appalling is we as taxpayers are paying the clowns exorbitant amounts to spy on US! Yet most Americans let it happen, scared shitless to ever open their mouths.

I borrow the final line in the amazing play "A Good Man is Hard To Find" -- IS ANYONE OUT THERE BREATHING?



Yep, I can't believe the blowback I've been getting in the "social blogosphere," with my posts about Manning and Snowdon -- wow! I think I might be turned in by my scared-shitless social group! (Who needs NSA and US Attorneys when you have the populace so cowed they turn on themselves?)
 
 
+3 # jwhzpr 2013-06-26 15:58
Hastings was certainly courageous and believed in reporting the truth and was probably murdered for it. I fear for Snowden. It will be very easy for him to be erased while fleeing our great democracy and then some lie will be shoveled to the masses about his demise which they will swallow without question. I never thought I would see the day when Orwell's 1984 would be surpassed by a president who was elected on a somewhat progressive agenda. Karl Rove gave no apology for using 1984 as his playbook for the Bush administration. But Obama surpassing it? Unbelievable. I was repulsed when the tea-partiers portrayed him as a hitler. . . but to know that he has admitted using drone strikes to kill American citizens without any adherence to the constitution is, well reminiscent of Hitler's SS, or millions of people in dictatorships who have "disappeared."
 
 
+14 # treadlightly 2013-06-24 20:04
I am trying to imagine a force equal to the task of making our government surrender to the will of the 300 million citizens who they are supposed to represent.
What would such a force look like? How can it remain peaceful yet defeat the most powerful military this world has seen?
If we fail to support the whistle blowers now, we will be missing an opportunity that may never come again.
 
 
+1 # blizmo1 2013-06-24 21:08
Quoting treadlightly:
I am trying to imagine a force equal to the task of making our government surrender to the will of the 300 million citizens who they are supposed to represent.
What would such a force look like? How can it remain peaceful yet defeat the most powerful military this world has seen?
If we fail to support the whistle blowers now, we will be missing an opportunity that may never come again.



True, true!! Speak out, stand up and let the dissention begin.

BRADLEY MANNING NEEDS TO HEAR FROM YOU --

Commander, HHC USAG
Attn: PFC Bradley Manning
239 Sheridan Ave, Bld 417
JBM-HH, VA 22211
 
 
-1 # jamander4 2013-06-24 20:54
There are no J Edgar Hoover-like "enemy lists" that we have knowledge of at the present time. Do such lists exist it's a secret so we wouldn't know if they did exist. Is it any better to spy on everyone to deterimine who the authorities don't like this week instead of just spying on those people on a list? Everyone includes every one on every list so there is no need for a list.
 
 
+6 # geraldom 2013-06-24 21:46
One of the biggest advantages that the United States has in its continuing downward spiral into becoming a despotic state and in continuing these illegal endless wars of aggression for world empire is the abundance of patriotic ignorant and naive individuals waiting in the wings to be used as cannon fodder to replace the people that have come before them and who have woken up to reality, unfortunately too late, to the real world.

A majority of the soldiers who came back from Vietnam, after the damage had already been done, woke up and realized the real agenda of the United States, but there were young gung-ho men waiting in the wings to fight our future wars until they themselves woke up to reality.

The very same can be said about people like Valerie Plame and her husband, Joe Wilson, who worked for the U.S. intelligence community. It's unfortunate that by the time they wake up to reality as to what our government and our country are really about, the damage has already done.

We've reached a point in this country, a point of no return, where the damage that has been done over the years has become more or less permanent, where there is no possibility of undoing it.

Even now there are enough young naive but patriotic men waiting in the wings who are willing to join the U.S. military as well as public servants like Valerie Plame and Joe Wilson who are willing to join the U.S. intelligence community to continue on with our destructive legacy.
 
 
0 # Milarepa 2013-06-25 00:09
Sweden is a small chickenshiite country. Sweden's FRA law means nothing globally, even though I wouldn't be surprised
it it's been used outside Sweden. The NSA Prism moloch is a different thing altogether, it affects the entire world population.
You can compare meerkats with molochs but why would you?
 
 
-2 # RobertMStahl 2013-06-25 06:28
Where is Indira Singh? The electronic landscape is new on the cultural horizon, a culture with a hole in the center. How do we plug that hole? Post-Darwinism is the only answer, but Darwin 'works' even for machinery. Those who love nature do not appreciate it on the level of OCCUPATION that machines running electricity through them maintain. Pure survival of the fittest leads to gestalt, particularly with the need to give these machines full authority to edge out humanity (Francisco J. Varela).
It is only a small part of the equation, but it is, perhaps, more pertinent than any other, that a smart second grade student could program the artificial intelligence required to 'follow the money' around the planet, or to stop subways from crashing in Japan, or develop existing oil fields, mainly because it is parallel processing AND and occupation. It learns because it gets used to its environment. Not to completely lose the context of major works like that of the Lindisfarne Association scientists, mostly deceased at this point, or other works like Laws of Form by G. Spencer Brown, or Ralph Abraham's math, or GUT-CP, but, without knowing the simple possibilities of how OCCUPATIONS become possible, how do we understand what it is we are losing? Where is Indira Singh? And, Paul Craig Roberts for President.
 
 
+2 # Milarepa 2013-06-25 07:41
To me, it's a lot worse than it looks. And a lot better. People are being crushed all over the place. Others, like most of us, avoid being crushed every day. I'm happy I'm alive and functioning with some degree of normalcy. Good luck Assange, Manning, Snowden and all the other fighters for freedom!
 
 
+4 # mjc 2013-06-25 08:04
The American public sometimes seems blissfully unaware of the invasion of their privacy. Witness the Facebook parameters or even certain public discussion sites...like HuffPo?? who know way too much about each one of us. Perhaps that is why the revelations of Snowden or even of the Valerie Plame Wilson and Joe Wilson really only raised the hackles on liberals' backs. The real problem is not the invasion of privacy but the ultimate use of that information, especially when our governments, state, local and national, can deny your basic civil rights. Know that seems obvious but the privacy of an individual in this country and perhaps many others is viewed as pathological, anti-social, and especially anti-patriot. The case of Bradley Manning, escorted to his trial by brutes twice his size, has aroused very little outcry. Voters might have thought that replacing a Bush with Obama would end the intrusions but a look at one of Obama's opening support for FISA should have warned all of us. The media is happy to appear true blue, patriotic, supportive of this war against terrorists...as David Gregory demonstrated very recently...and big government is here to stay so we need help in slogging through the issues. Many don't even try and therein lies the problem.
 
 
+1 # rhgreen 2013-06-25 10:44
"Snowden will be hunted relentlessly and, when finally found, with glee, brought back to the US in handcuffs and severely punished." I just hope they're wrong on this one. The rest of the article I like.
 
 
+2 # Kathymoi 2013-06-25 14:43
A question that needs attention is "What is national security?" What does the security of the nation depend on? That requires a definition of "the nation". The security that might be endangered by exposing the vast Prism project of the NSA is not the security of American citizens or the security of the people who live within the boundaries of the continental United States. Whose security is it? It seems ever more clear by the day that the government is in business for itself, and its billionaire friends in multinational corporations. The government's definition of national security is certainly not the definition that the citizenry holds of its security. Let's define our terms.
 
 
+3 # laureljensen 2013-06-26 07:50
I do appreciate Plame/Wilson commenting on the state of the US intelligence Goliath but take exception to this:

"To date, there is no proof that the government has used this information to pursue and harass US citizens based on their political views. There are no J Edgar Hoover-like "enemy lists" ... yet."

There are indeed enemy lists of US citizens based on political views (if that's a term we want to accept and I question that wisdom). Activists of all stripes, anti-war, environmental, animal rights, occupy, and probably many, many, others are definitely on "lists". The FBI makes photographs of available to local and state law enforcement agencies ahead of protests for instance.

I've personally seen "leaders" arrested at protests as they simply march in the street - no apparent reason, they were doing the same thing everyone else was. Definitely on some kind of list.

I've also participated in attempted "flash mob" protests, all non-violent and perfectly within the law, that used e-mail to notify where and when the protest would take place only to have police present in masse to thwart the attempt. Were they monitoring and "reading" the communications? Very likely. Also possible that there were, and are, undercover cops/agents embedded in the activist community - compiling "lists" for one thing.

So let's not think that they are simply collecting all the data and aggregating it. IT'S NOT TRUE.
 
 
+3 # hondacivic21218 2013-06-26 11:03
NSA's monetary cost effectiveness?
Does anyone have a guess?
How many $billions has each aborted (alleged)terror ist plot cost the taxpayer?
 
 
+4 # hondacivic21218 2013-06-26 11:06
In its ignorance of electronics technology,I think congress has been bamboozled into giving NSA a bottomless well of $$.
 
 
+3 # Walter J Smith 2013-06-26 11:55
RE the first two paragraphs.

Let's be absolutely clear here about the relationship between the US Government and our privacy and liberty. To say in any form, question, comment, whatever, the relationship is in terms of the US Government protecting our privacy and our liberty is akin to saying the wolves & foxes are the best guardians of the henhouse.

HELLO!

The writers almost imply as much, but then, shy away from what they were about to suggest: "We are now dealing with a vast intelligence-in dustrial complex that is largely unaccountable to its citizens."

After that, they drift off into watching Cheney on TV.

Oh, dear.

Yesterday's best and brightest are already proving to be today's worst and dullest.
 

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