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Boardman writes: “An unintendedly brilliant example of self-induced moral blindness to racist behavior comes from Pat Boone, the octogenarian multi-millionaire musician whose fortune was built on racist exploitation of black music in a racist music industry devoted to catering to America's white racism."

(photo: CNN)
(photo: CNN)


“It’s Not Polite to Say Nigger in Public....”

By William Boardman, Reader Supported News

26 June 15

 

“Racism, we are not cured of it. And, and, and it’s not just a matter of, uh, it not being polite to say nigger in public. That’s not the measure of whether racism still exists or not. It’s not just a matter of overt discrimination. Societies don’t, overnight, completely erase everything that happened two to three hundred years prior.”

– President Obama, June 22,
on Marc Maron podcast


his piece will end with a brief personal experience I had recently, an experience that illuminates what the President is saying and raises the question of whether it’s polite to say “nigger” in private. My experience underscores that what the President is saying is obviously and profoundly true, and has been since long before he was born. And my recent experience illustrates the abiding armor of denial and determined ignorance that allows people to enjoy the advantages of a racist society without having to acknowledge that it exists. 

An unintendedly brilliant example of self-induced moral blindness to racist behavior comes from Pat Boone, the octogenarian multi-millionaire musician whose fortune was built on racist exploitation of black music in a racist music industry devoted to catering to America’s white racism. Boone’s fundamentalist Christian self-delusions about race appeared on WND (aka WorldNetDaily), self-described as “an independent news company dedicated to uncompromising journalism, seeking truth and justice and revitalizing the role of the free press as a guardian of liberty.”

According to Boone, it’s President Obama’s fault for not preaching that “racial divides and prejudice had greatly diminished and that our society was truly becoming colorblind.” Having said that, Boone provided a white racist analysis of the killing of two black children, Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown, unarmed and shot by reckless white men. As for Charleston, where an avowed white racist killed nine black people in church in hope of starting a race war, Boone explains it away as having a “racist element,” but being “inspired by Satan”! While blaming Obama for “erasing” God from public life, Boone pleads for a return to America as a Christian nation – but he does not mention that American Christianity was a powerful defender of American slavery. 

This mode of thinking, or rather this mode of avoiding real thought, is endemic to a large section of the American population and has been, in one form or another, since before there was a United States. How else do you get a Constitution in which slaves don’t get to vote, but do get counted as three-fifths of a person in order to inflate Congressional representation of slave owners? Orwell called it Doublethink in “1984,” but it’s a much older American tradition. 

One form of denial is feigned shock that “Obama said the N-word!” 

Assorted television babble-heads on CNN, NBC, MSNBC, CBS, Fox and elsewhere got all a-twitter over the President’s saying “nigger,” which they sanitized to “the N-word” with such characterizations as “extremely direct language” and “shock value” and “jarring comment” and “electric” and “one of the most charged racial slurs in the English language” – all of which are projections of the commentators&” subjectivity. They are not at all accurate descriptions of what the President said, which was detached, measured, analytical, and precisely accurate. But who wants to hear that on TV? As Wolf Blitzer put it on CNN, “Many people may find this offensive.” CNN’s black legal analyst said the word should never be used. In sharp disagreement, CNN black anchor Don Lemon articulately defended adult conversation about difficult issues on television (for example, on Democracy NOW). 

By paying attention only to the President’s use of the word “nigger” and not to his much broader context, television’s purveyors of conventional wisdom manage to deny the relevance of the President’s larger point: that racism has been endemic to American (and pre-American) culture for some 300 years and that racist thinking remains alive and well in many forms. Focusing on the President’s use of “nigger” as an excuse not to talk about racism in America is, arguably, just another form of racism in America. 

Larry Wilmore on The Nightly Show reduced the TV babble to its ultimate Fox-accusing absurdity, President Obama saying “nigger” in a State of the Union speech. Wilmore also played clips of other presidents saying “nigger,” albeit in a less thoughtful way than Obama: 

  • Nixon: “Our niggers are better than their niggers”

  • LBJ: “there’s more niggers voting there than white folks”

Wilmore also indicated that, while there’s apparently no record of presidents like Washington or Jefferson saying “nigger,” they did own one or more. 

Another effect of all the empty blather about the President saying “nigger” is to distract from the empty gestures about various Confederate flags. American devotion to the Confederate flag is, literally, insane or dishonest or hypocritical, or all three, or pick your word. Why? All Confederate flags are symbols of treason against the United States of America, and somehow it’s OK to celebrate them and merchandise them and pretend they’re something they never were. The Confederacy committed treason as defined by the Constitution and too many people would do it all over again, for the same racist reasons.

What does one young South Carolinian tell us about America today? 

So here’s the personal experience I mentioned. Over the weekend of June 20-21, I was at a family wedding in northern Maryland. The Sunday before Obama’s podcast became public, I was at a post-wedding cookout with maybe 20 people of various ages, many in their twenties. It was a definitely non-political social gathering. 

One young man in his mid-twenties was there as the new beau of the bride’s sister. He was pleasant, attractive, well-spoken, polite, and had grown up in South Carolina. During our first conversation with several other people in the kitchen, David (not his real name) spoke enthusiastically of his work with horses and Brahma cattle. He described a roping gone wrong when he was forced to jump his horse over a fallen Brahma cow, whose horn scored his horse’s underbelly. He seemed comfortable and at ease as the conversation shifted from person to person. He gave no hint of any socially disruptive opinions or behavior. But he was drinking. 

Some time later I wandered into a conversation David was having with the bride’s mother on the screen porch. This conversation was already political. David was complaining about Jon Stewart on The Daily Show for calling out Charleston for having streets named after Civil War generals and otherwise ridiculing South Carolina’s history. Stewart was about to start a race war, David argued, without mentioning Dylann Roof killing nine people. David said he was concerned about a race war because someone had already shot at the Confederate flag at the Capitol. David said we should just let history be history, and besides some people treated their slaves well.

By the time our hostess came into this conversation, David was talking about Obama being Kenyan and like that. Our hostess told him firmly not to talk like that in her house. When he didn’t seem to get the point, I leaned in and suggested that maybe we should both be quiet. He admitted he’d been drinking, but throughout this conversation he remained polite, friendly, quiet, apparently sincere in beliefs he didn’t seem to think anyone would find unusual. He came across as a basically sweet kid. 

The last thing he said to me, before others took him swimming, he said with the same earnest pleasantness. He said, “I don’t hate niggers.” 



William M. Boardman has over 40 years experience in theatre, radio, TV, print journalism, and non-fiction, including 20 years in the Vermont judiciary. He has received honors from Writers Guild of America, Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Vermont Life magazine, and an Emmy Award nomination from the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

Reader Supported News is the Publication of Origin for this work. Permission to republish is freely granted with credit and a link back to Reader Supported News.

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+60 # Radscal 2015-06-26 14:48
Thanks for making this personal, William. I'm sure all of us have related stories. Being a blue-eyed USian, I've had people assume to know my sympathies since I was a teen.

This is true for both whites and blacks I've met.

Racial prejudice cannot be legislated away. That requires cultural shifts that take generations, and the US has seen some significant movement in that way.

But racism (meaning systemic discriminatory use of power) can be made illegal, and can be prosecuted. The US has made some significant steps there, too... but not nearly what we can and should demand.

Symbolism is powerful. ALL symbols of pride in the slave system and those who fought for it should be taken down from all public spaces.

Yes, some will see that as "igniting a race war." But they are wrong. The race war has been going on here since 1619, and a century earlier in the former Spanish colonies.

One signal of a truce is to strike the colors of a warring side. If we are to signal a meaningful desire to end the race war once and for all, those symbols must be struck from all public spaces.
 
 
+12 # Merlin 2015-06-26 21:47
Radscal 2015-06-26 14:48

Extremely well said Radscal!

"Symbolism is powerful. ALL symbols of pride in the slave system and those who fought for it should be taken down from all public spaces."
 
 
+27 # jwb110 2015-06-26 18:19
And you can bet that Mitch McConnell and his ilk have been calling the President a "nigger" all the time he has been in office. And if you asked any one of them if they had called him a "nigger" they would go all Mark Furman on you.
And as for Pat Boone, he was always a light weight but very much like an Eva Peron, he/she was at the right place at the right time. At least Peron gave back to the mixed races that she came from. Not a lot but more than anyone expected.
The thing I most don't get about the new Christian/Polit ical rhetoric is that they don't seem to remember that they will have their sins laid before them on the judgement day of which they so crave. Rhetoric is a lie wrapped up in a Christian.
 
 
+22 # elkingo 2015-06-26 19:00
In philosophy, there is distinction of the "use" and the "mention" of a term. The latter means talking about the term,not the object indicated by it. The difference between say: Boston has 6,000,000 people, and "Boston" has 6 letters. Obama mentioned the term, he did not use it.It was a sensible, serious and courageous thing to do. And it is ground-breaking .

But there's more. Whitey's (our) insane prohibition of using the term at all, imbues it with a kind of reverse holy or perhaps satanic power. It must not be uttered at all! This puts it with the actual Jewish name for God, which one may not utter. The best way I know to keep the power of the vile and poisonous epithet is to imbue it with the "sacrosanct" transcendent power of a shibboleth! I like to believe that the President knows this too, and it partially informs his use...uh, mention of it. Bravo Barack! A a true contribution!

O and:Nigger: Nigger: Nigger!: a salute to all my fellow Nigger friends,of whatever color.
 
 
+9 # economagic 2015-06-26 21:29
Amen.
 
 
+7 # Radscal 2015-06-26 23:04
And your and jwb's comments demonstrate what some of my black friends said they were concerned about when Obama used the term.

Now (some) "whitey's" are going to feel empowered to use the term.

Let's be clear here. For MANY black people, that word was the LAST FRIGGING THING THEY HEARD before dying often painful and always demeaning deaths.

Yes, it is sacrosanct. And NO, you have not earned the "right" to toss it around as you please.
 
 
0 # bmiluski 2015-06-28 13:11
IF nigger is such a hateful word then WHY do black men, women, and children use is with such ease? Are the words I can or cannot use determined by the color of my skin?
 
 
+2 # WBoardman 2015-06-28 15:52
bmiluski might find these distinctions helpful:

Mentioning the word (thanks, elkingo, above) should not be
prohibited, not even by custom, because its weight is real and continuing and needs to be examined and understood.

Why do [some] black people use "niggah" so easily?
Ask one, next time you hear it.
My understanding is shaky, but it makes sense
to take such a hateful, ugly word and use is as a talisman
against itself in an effort to rob it of some of its power.

Then there's the obvious:
"nigger" said by a black person is very different from
"nigger" said by white, Asian, or any other people.

Linguistically, "nigger" perpetuates slavery.
 
 
-2 # bmiluski 2015-06-29 10:00
What a bunch of bullshit WBOARDMAN.... How dare you (or anyone of any color) assume what MY meaning of the word is. The very fact that it's use is restricted to only a certain peoples DOES indeed give it weight.
 
 
-44 # BKnowswhitt2 2015-06-26 19:01
Boardman you're going deep picking on an 80's year old crooner and legend Pat Boone as your example of rascist attitude. You offer no explanation for the current young attitudes like what happened in Charleston SC. I however offer some. Hate and Racism are Learned they are Taught .. and not innate. I agree with Pat Boone that the 'Prince of Darkness' is responsible. How so you say? Something like this. All the right reasons come into this young man's mind . i dont' pretend to know what actually might have happened so here goes: He's been programmed anti government anti north authoritarian right response to his or his families current dilemma in life .. he thinks (this of course is assuming that he is not mentally disordered first and i mean clinically) .. so he carries out the act. Prince of Darkness right at hand all the way leading him and others disillusioned by their reality .. to the final episode in that church ... then the Fallen Angel is looking back .. ha ha ha ha ... Got Ya!!! Yeah the Devil in simple terms. Too simple you say? Then i say be ware my friend .. Mr Boone is correct all killing all hate are the direct opposite of good and love .. and that be known as works of The Fallen Angel ... Amen
 
 
+17 # economagic 2015-06-26 21:53
I'm an aTHEIST personally, but I would not necessarily take issue with any of that as long as it is understood as an alternative way of saying the same thing. But I would point out that many people seem to believe seriously that blaming it on Satan absolves them of any personal responsibility.

Satan also mislead all of those who carefully taught Dylan Roof, and all of the people who taught them. But each one also had opportunities to recognize that such teaching was in direct opposition to other things they had been taught and to start asking questions on that basis.

In the church in which I grew up they sang a hymn by James Russell Lowell:

"Once to every man and nation
Comes the moment to decide
In the strife of truth with falsehood
For the good or evil side."

I really liked that hymn, but as I grew older I came to realize that like many hymns of the Church it is good poetry but bad philosophy. (Many are bad poetry AND bad philosophy.) That moment does not come once in any person's life. Rather, every moment is that moment, when we choose what we will do in the next moment. Let's agree not to delve into the morass of free will, but stipulate that humans are not automatons or puppets but in some sense moral beings. As such we make moral choices in every moment. If you want to call making a choice for evil succumbing to the Devil, OK, but let's not forget that one always has in some sense the opportunity to refuse to succumb, or at least to ask why.
 
 
-10 # BKnowswhitt2 2015-06-27 12:04
Christianity is all about Free Will and i know atheists and all of them good people. I'm saying there is evil in every part about that shooting and a higher evil power if you believe the story of the fallen angel .. and it works it's 'Magic' through all that's going on including negative debate argumentation about the flag in SC the civil war .. liberal vs dem rich vs poor the entire game is gamed by that which you dont' believe .. so i believe ... just me view .. no more than that i think ...
 
 
+9 # kalpal 2015-06-27 05:27
How strange that in "the house of the lord" the prince of darkness can incite mass murder? The problem with religion is that it requires a willful insanity which is then asserted to be truly sane because a belief in baseless BS is far more valid than any facts can ever be.

That is meant to show that if it is good then surely a perfect god is responsible but if it is bad then one of god's creations is responsible while still being perfect within the evil that is wrought?
 
 
-10 # BKnowswhitt2 2015-06-27 12:07
There is no house of the lord and evil angel .. broke away from that .. on his own deluding and running his own show ... The World as a whole reason for Christ .. only explanation as it's unfathomobole otherwise ... lies at the core of all wrong doing and yes you can choose to acknowledge it or not .. does not make it go away ...
 
 
+13 # vt143 2015-06-27 08:40
To blame this Roof's act and all racism as "Satan's fault" it to pass the blame. It's way too easy to say that. We all have to look into ourselves and see where the hate is. We have learned it, not from Satan, but from our society.
 
 
-47 # BKnowswhitt2 2015-06-26 19:16
Final Point: Proof in the pudding that it's the Prince of Darkness Fallen Angel as depicted and reason for the world and spiritual struggle we are in and it's in ever single part of our society and the world as a hole is ... that kid in S.C. killed what 11 people in what? A church. And who were they and what were they practicing? Christianity as best they could ... Prince of Darkness .. clear and present danger ...
 
 
+8 # kalpal 2015-06-27 05:30
When you begin with a baseless assumption your conclusion is even more lacking than the baseless assumption that underpins your preconceived conclusion. You started with zilch and ended with less than bupkis.
 
 
-7 # BKnowswhitt2 2015-06-27 12:16
Ignoring even a remote possibility that i am correct on this one and dismissing it as rubbish is your Free Will to choose ... and means you only trust that which you can logically determine by what is measurable and in front of you .. that is lacking as far as i am concerned .. wish you the best though ...
 
 
-4 # BKnowswhitt2 2015-06-27 13:12
Please allow me to introduce myself
I'm a man of wealth and taste
I've been around for a long, long year
Stole many a man's soul and faith
And I was 'round when Jesus Christ
Had his moment of doubt and pain
Made damn sure that Pilate
Washed his hands and sealed his fate
Pleased to meet you
Hope you guess my name
But what's puzzling you
Is the nature of my game
I stuck around St. Petersburg
When I saw it was a time for a change
Killed the czar and his ministers
Anastasia screamed in vain
I rode a tank
Held a general's rank
When the blitzkrieg raged
And the bodies stank
Pleased to meet you
Hope you guess my name, oh yeah
Ah, what's puzzling you
Is the nature of my game, oh yeah
I watched with glee
While your kings and queens
Fought for ten decades
For the gods they made
I shouted out,
"Who killed the Kennedys?"
When after all
It was you and me
Let me please introduce myself
I'm a man of wealth and taste
And I laid traps for troubadours
Who get killed before they reached Bombay
 
 
-3 # BKnowswhitt2 2015-06-27 13:14
Pleased to meet you
Hope you guessed my name, oh yeah
But what's puzzling you
Is the nature of my game, oh yeah, get down, baby
Pleased to meet you
Hope you guessed my name, oh yeah
But what's confusing you
Is just the nature of my game
Just as every cop is a criminal
And all the sinners saints
As heads is tails
Just call me Lucifer
Cause I'm in need of some restraint
So if you meet me
Have some courtesy
Have some sympathy, and some taste
Use all your well-learned politesse
Or I'll lay your soul to waste, um yeah
Pleased to meet you
Hope you guessed my name, um yeah
But what's puzzling you
Is the nature of my game, um mean it, get down
Woo, who
Oh yeah, get on down
Oh yeah
Oh yeah!
Tell me baby, what's my name
Tell me honey, can ya guess my name
Tell me baby, what's my name
I tell you one time, you're to blame
Ooo, who
Ooo, who, who
Oh, yeah
What's me name
Tell me, baby, what's my name
Tell me, sweetie, what's my name
Ooo, who, who
Oh, yeah
 
 
-2 # BKnowswhitt2 2015-06-27 15:23
Slaughter in the church was religious persecution. The Black culture in America is primarily Christian upholding ... MLK led the final chapter to race relations by turning the other cheek with non violent protest and resistance to un Christian Principles of slavery prejudice and racism. It's impossible to dismiss religion and in particular Christianity with what happened in the Church in Charleston ...
 
 
+22 # dipierro4 2015-06-26 19:29
...Boone explains it away as having a “racist element,” but being “inspired by Satan”!...

Mr. Boone is in his dotage. Be gentle with him. We progressives have brains that will decay with age as well -- just wait!

LBJ may have used the N-word, but when the chips were down, he did the right thing, knowing that his party would lose the South, and probably knowing that his own people would regard him as a traitor forever.

"...and besides some people treated their slaves well...."

Think of the building full of workers killed in India, making products for us. And the Shirtwaist Factory deaths. And the workers killed in Charlotte, NC, due to being locked inside a building that burned. Farmworkers around our nation exposed to toxic chemicals and not being told. So many workers without any medical insurance at all. Workers Compensation laws presently being gutted so that workers cannot get good medical care. Compare: Jefferson allowed only the very best physicians to treat his slaves.

The point is NOT that slavery is okay. Rather, the capitalist system has always exploited workers, and slavery is just one instance of this. It's easy (and very comfortable) to bash slavery because it's so obviously wrong on its face; but this should not give us an excuse to deny and excuse other evils that are as bad or worse in some ways, just easier to deny.
 
 
+14 # Merlin 2015-06-26 22:16
dipierro4 2015-06-26 19:29
“Mr. Boone is in his dotage. Be gentle with him. We progressives have brains that will decay with age as well -- just wait!”

I don’t have to wait! I am 80, and my mind is just fine, thank you! Besides, age is no excuse for expressing racism. A hateful attitude, and that is what racism represents, is as nasty at 80 as it is at 20.

As noted in the article, Boone was:

“…the octogenarian multi-millionai re musician whose fortune was built on racist exploitation of black music in a racist music industry devoted to catering to America’s white racism.”

Look into Boone’s history and you will find that Boardman is correct. It is well known that some white musicians literally stole the black creativity and profited on that thievery, giving nothing to the Black musicians they stole it from. AND… Boone was not 80 years old when he did this! He was a young man!

Your posts, here and below, are attempting to justify racism and slavery, even if you are doing it obliquely. That simply does not work, no matter how you try to pull it off.

For instance. you say:
“The prohibition comes from the demands of Black folk. No question about that.”

This pure horsepucky! You are blaming the victim. Your “reasoning” is convoluted.
 
 
+3 # Radscal 2015-06-26 23:22
Thank you, Merlin.

Boone not only got wealthy stealing black music, but his Christian Taliban excuse for racist terrorism managed to survive the Civil Rights Movement, which he saw play out right before his eyes.

He actually knew full well how the music industry screwed over blacks, and to his credit, he stood up to the network multiple times to insist blacks be seen on American Bandstand, despite threats from (mostly) Southern channels.
 
 
+12 # williamb3 2015-06-26 19:31
Too many people didn't seem to understand (or claimed not to understand) why President Obama used the word. But I got it right away. My philosophy on such things is, let's not hide behind euphemisms like "N-word". I prefer to come right out and say, "nigger". Not because I like the word--emphatica lly, I don't. It's to face it down and tell it, "I'm not afraid of you. I'm going to use it to show you how sorry you are." By doing that, I believe you deprive it of whatever power it has.
 
 
+8 # Radscal 2015-06-26 23:25
Are you black?

If not, then you never had a reason to fear hearing the word.

It is not up to white people to decide when and how that murderous epithet has lost its ability to invoke terror.

And Obama was quite clear when he said that white people JUST NOT SAYING the word is NOT ENOUGH.
 
 
+22 # Barbell 2015-06-26 19:48
We also have friends in Charleston, SC who have made similar comments, to-wit; "the Negroes were much happier as slaves than they are now". She had not been drinking and seemed astounded that we took offense to her comment.
 
 
-20 # dipierro4 2015-06-26 20:49
Is there a grain of truth in that? Black folk today have "legal" freedom, but in the environments where most of them live, their health indices are poor, they are exposed to violence, they live in crowded population centers that really are destructive to the human psyche, they suffer a lot of environmental pollution with effects on the body and brain, etc. They never know a quiet night of hearing only the sounds of nature and being lit by moonlight.

If someone gave me a choice of being reborn again tomorrow in North Philly or Southeast Durham or Raleigh, or OTOH in a rural environment with a pretty decent slavemaster, I'm not sure I wouldn't choose the latter. Some of the old slaves made it to 100 years old. If I grew up in some of the places above, what would my chances of that be? And what would my memories be?
 
 
-1 # economagic 2015-06-26 22:05
One hundred years of what?

Every person is free to choose: Even a slave is free to resist and choose the lash and possibly death rather than to accept one's servitude. Many of the founders, and many others who came after, would have hoped that they made the former choice, that is, to die rather than to live as slaves.

I'm not condemning the choice to live in slavery, and I'm certainly not praising the situation in which many people of all races live as a result of that other fundamentalist religion of which "Capitalism" is just the current name and form.

But it is difficult not to see a choice of servitude as chattel over an opportunity to struggle for freedom, thereby giving up some of the most fundamental aspects of what it means to be human, as nihilistic.
 
 
+15 # Radscal 2015-06-26 23:30
What a load of crap!

No human being prefers to live as property with no rights.

The average life expectancy of "freshwater slaves" was 5 years!
 
 
+4 # kalpal 2015-06-27 05:32
So if less than 1/1000th of 1% of slaves lived a less than horrific life, then surely the rest who had been overworked, whipped and raped did OK?
 
 
+16 # oakes721 2015-06-26 20:14
Columbus sent word back to the aristocracy that the "Indians" could be easily enslaved. Plantations needed cheap labor. Racism was invented for this economic purpose: to keep the poor at each others throats and away from the rich. It's been said that the word 'economy' means the transfer of wealth from the poor to the rich.
 
 
-1 # bmiluski 2015-06-28 13:17
Oh honey.....slave ry has been around for millennia. Who do you think kidnapped and then sold their "brothers" to the white man?
 
 
-15 # dipierro4 2015-06-26 20:32
I can't agree. Of course, our (whitey's) aversion to the N-word, and condemnation of its use, allow us a certain hypocritical satisfaction. But that is not the whole story.

The prohibition comes from the demands of Black folk. No question about that. I would not dare use that word in front of a Black person and you know it well.

I recall one day I heard a white guy – I think a homeless guy, maybe a bit mentally ill – get into some disagreement with a Black guy, on a downtown street. Nothing physical, just some words. The guy said "Nigger!" At that point, EVERY Black male on that block, on both sides of the street -- at least a half dozen -- and I think even on the next block -- EVERY one of them, stopped whatever they were doing, turned around, simultaneously as robots or as soldiers on a drill (it was eerie to see!), and began following the guy, to the end of the block, around the corner, and out of my sight. After that, I don't know what happened. I did not want to see. You're telling me that this is just a manifestation of "Whitey's... insane prohibition of using the term"?? Uh ... no.

Not to say that That Word is okay. In our time and place, it's not, for white folks. I'm a little resentful that it's bad only for us, and yes, I think Black folks (many, but not all) use this to get over on us. But one has to make a decision to look for the best in other people and hope for the best, or stay angry at them. One way, you have an okay life, the other way you don't.
 
 
+6 # economagic 2015-06-26 22:14
You overlook the fact that Whitey continues to spit in the face of the nigger, giving "him" constant reason to remain a lot angrier than most African American's are most of the time. And of course I'm being exceedingly genteel, since many Whities actually kill niggers in preference to spitting in their faces.

As a white senior citizen I'm not really entitled to say this. I have not experienced any of that myself, and my use of The Word should be viewed with suspicion for that reason. But I have every reason to consider it accurate, and a reality of present-day American life that we Whities gloss over at OUR peril.
 
 
+9 # Radscal 2015-06-26 23:42
"I'm a little resentful that it's bad only for us"

Awww. Poor "whitey."

Tell ya what. When blacks have the same opportunities for good stuff as whites, and you have the same opportunities to be harassed as blacks, then let's talk about whether or not it's cool for whites to use the N-word.
 
 
+2 # bmiluski 2015-06-28 13:19
Well Radscal....let' s hope you remember that the next time you call a WOMAN.... girl.
 
 
-26 # egbegb 2015-06-26 21:25
But America, in general, is not racist. You have provided no convincing evidence to the contrary. The "White people are racist" meme is an urban legend. It's simply false. Nowhere can you find statistics to back up your nonsensical claim.

In short, it is propaganda and you know it.
 
 
+6 # reiverpacific 2015-06-26 22:00
A couple of personal experiences relating to the South, one irritating, one good.
A draftsman that I was obliged to use on parts of some projects when I worked for a multi-national engineering and construction company based in Boise, Idaho, was a real big-mouth from Ga, who took a vacation in L.A. (Gawd knows why), telling anybody that would listen on his return, that his truck would veer towards Niggers when he passed them. When somebody told him that that was racist language, he replied simply "I ain't no "Racialist" (sic) -I just don' like Niggers"!
Conversely in Lexington, KY, I was hired regularly to play classical guitar at the garden parties of a Doyen from one of the established upper class, horse-owning dynasties, respected and obsequiously bowed-to by the wannabes of the city, county and state, and found her to be utterly charming, unpretentious and, on speaking frankly to her black head servant and cook, was told that they couln' ha' asked, or prayed for a better employer in all the World.
I used to take my four year old daughter to most of these pleasant (and well paid) gatherings. So enchanted with her was the genial hostess, at one party I heard her remarking to her eldest son that if he didn't give her a grandchild soon, she was going to leave all her money and property to my wee lassie.
I snuck up to him just after that broad hint and said to him sotto voce, "I'll give you $10,000.00 to get fixed and I'll pay for the operation"!
He took it well.
 
 
+15 # lfeuille 2015-06-26 22:05
Quoting egbegb:
But America, in general, is not racist. You have provided no convincing evidence to the contrary. The "White people are racist" meme is an urban legend. It's simply false. Nowhere can you find statistics to back up your nonsensical claim.

In short, it is propaganda and you know it.


This comment illustrates the point of the article perfectly. Clueless denialism.
 
 
0 # vicnada 2015-06-29 23:01
Quoting lfeuille:

This comment illustrates the point of the article perfectly. Clueless denialism.

We will never make progress on racism--nor prejudice of any kind--without first and foremost acknowledging that we are ALL racist, we are ALL prejudiced. Our lives need to be an act of self-education, of throwing off our prejudicial views that were inherited or part of our schooling. We discover that our struggle to become more truly human requires, as the first step, that we fully assume and accept our limitation and short-sightedne ss. And this is most uncomfortably reflected in those whom we most judge.
 
 
+6 # reiverpacific 2015-06-26 22:06
Quoting egbegb:
But America, in general, is not racist. You have provided no convincing evidence to the contrary. The "White people are racist" meme is an urban legend. It's simply false. Nowhere can you find statistics to back up your nonsensical claim.

In short, it is propaganda and you know it.


-So let's have YOUR statistics to disprove it, o' Bubba.
You canna accuse somebody that you are accusing of the same thing and expect to be taken seriously.
This aint Newsmax, US News and World Report, a Supermarket check-out Tabloid nor the Fixed News, Ripoff MuckDoc Fantasy-channel y'know!
Put up or bugger-off!
 
 
+7 # kalpal 2015-06-27 05:34
America in general is rabidly racist. Anyone claiming the contrary is a marrow deep liar.
 
 
+2 # chinaski 2015-06-28 14:19
Quoting kalpal:
America in general is rabidly racist. Anyone claiming the contrary is a marrow deep liar.

Quoting egbegb:
But America, in general, is not racist. You have provided no convincing evidence to the contrary. The "White people are racist" meme is an urban legend. It's simply false. Nowhere can you find statistics to back up your nonsensical claim.

In short, it is propaganda and you know it.

Well Sherman, looks like we'll have to fire up the waybac machine and set our dial for 1988 and Peggy McIntosh's Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack.
http://www.deanza.edu/faculty/lewisjulie/White%20Priviledge%20Unpacking%20the%20Invisible%20Knapsack.pdf
One doesn't have to be a cross-burning, confederate flag waving, niggerhatin white redneck to be involved in racism. All it takes is a day to day lack of awareness of living in a world of priviledge, one that has all the built-in transparency of alleged birthright. Advantages that dont look like advantages because they were always there, always put out on the buffet. Everybody gets them free, right?
Not everybody, and thats all it takes.
 
 
-10 # Patriot 2015-06-26 21:34
"...racist exploitation of black music in a racist music industry devoted to catering to America’s white racism."

Nothing is worse than rewriting history to make it fit someone's contemporary point of view. Boardman is wrong: The '50s explosion of rock-n-roll played a huge part in breaching the rock-solid wall of separation and discrimination that had been built between Negro and Caucasian Americans. This is neither the place nor the moment to pursue that statement, but it is accepted as historical fact, and trying to make it something else is just plain wrong.

My two cents' worth!

Anyone who'd care to pursue the conversation is welcome to contact me. I am one of the friendlies, not one of the hostiles; please don't shoot! (grin)
 
 
+9 # lfeuille 2015-06-26 22:07
Quoting Patriot:
"...racist exploitation of black music in a racist music industry devoted to catering to America’s white racism."

Nothing is worse than rewriting history to make it fit someone's contemporary point of view. Boardman is wrong: The '50s explosion of rock-n-roll played a huge part in breaching the rock-solid wall of separation and discrimination that had been built between Negro and Caucasian Americans. This is neither the place nor the moment to pursue that statement, but it is accepted as historical fact, and trying to make it something else is just plain wrong.

My two cents' worth!

Anyone who'd care to pursue the conversation is welcome to contact me. I am one of the friendlies, not one of the hostiles; please don't shoot! (grin)


That may be how whites saw it, but many "Negros" saw it as exploitation.
 
 
+8 # Radscal 2015-06-26 23:51
It is true that rock and roll broke down quite a few racial barriers. In fact, that's exactly why so many whites referred to it as "the devil's music" and busted integrated rock shows.

That does not refute the point that white singers "covered" blacks' songs specifically so as to make money, knowing full well that they were cutting those black artists' financial throats in the process.

Pat Boone's cover of Little Richard's "Tutti Frutti" is not only criminal, but embarrassing.

The real thing:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F13JNjpNW6c

Boone's horrendous (but vastly more air-played and so more profitable) rendition:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZFxTvffJqOg
 
 
+8 # WBoardman 2015-06-27 08:36
Patriot confuses historical reality at one time
with historical change at another.

In the early fifties black music – known as "race music" –
and black musicians were cruelly exploited by the
music industry.

That the industry changed in the midst of the Civil Rights
movement is actually evidence that the injustices were
real.

For every Charlie Christian playing with Benny Goodman
there were likely many more who could play only segregated venues, whose music was ripped off, and who never
received just compensation.

That the music industry evolved toward integration was
possible only because it was so racially divided
for so long.

Black music is part of the mainstream now, but in a
sense it remains largely segregated – the big difference
being that black artists now reap the rewards of their
creativity more often.
 
 
-1 # BKnowswhitt2 2015-06-27 22:15
Boardman you should see the History of Jazz on NetFlix former Public Broadcasting ... part and parcel and paralleled the struggle for race rights .. Jazz derived from Gospel which became first Jazz then Blues is the only historically proven truly America and American born music of our culture. Tied to Christianity and Gospel the messangers came forth .... and that music through that medium changed the hearts adn minds of myriads .. leading to the changes we espouse ... the throwbacks the hate that is ongoing .. again i give those credits to the Fallen Angel ... and the African American Culture will back me up on that as well lessons learned ... we're not done yet .. Evil still prevalent even amongst debate in the blog ..
 
 
+4 # reiverpacific 2015-06-27 09:24
@ "Patriot".
Rock 'n Roll was commercially usurped by white recording companies, resisted by especially Southern politicians. There is a 50's clip of the fierce condemnation of "Nigger Music" and it's deleterious effect on "our" youth being blurted out by a politico in the Halls of Power.
This is the kind of stuffed-shirt attitude that helped to spur the youth rebellion of the 1960's both here, the UK and the rest of Europe.
Here's a clip of the great Count Basie and a small core ensemble extracted from the famous big band, playing his own "Basie Boogie" and they'd been doing this number as a "Novelty" since the 1940's https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OByckZIxtCE.
If THAT isn't Rock 'n Roll, with the body movements of the horn players and the raspy tone of the Sax, then I don't know what is. There are recordings of Big Bill Broonzy playing this very same form back in the 30's.
It springs from the the slaves being "permitted" to dance and drum in New Orleans' Congo Square, "As it was deemed of no value, therefore was not taken from them", then their purchase of band instruments after the Civil war disbandments, followed by branching out into Jazz, Blues and Gospel as America's only major and ORIGINAL arts form to Global culture.
Finally, when Cornetist Freddy Keppard of New Oreleans was offered the first chance to record "Jass", he turned it down with the comment "The Whites'll just copy it and exploit it".
True to form, the Original Dixieland Jazz Band did just that!
 
 
-8 # seeuingoa 2015-06-27 01:55
Nigger, N for negro,

and

Wigger, W for white
 
 
-4 # dquandle 2015-06-27 02:13
"albeit in a less thoughtful way than Obama"

Obama's hypocrisy is staggering. His "thoughtful" use will be followed by volleys of Hellfire missiles eviscerating other non-whites, from Predator drones, throughout the world, as he has done over the past 6.5 years.

His version of charity and "equality", with or without vile epithets, come at the tip of a flying bomb. It's still lynching.
 
 
+8 # kalpal 2015-06-27 05:42
I first landed on this continent at the end of 1962. I did not speak English and was ignorant of cultural norms. I kept quiet and watched Americans. I learned English from TV, school and listening to Americans speak. Quite often I hear derogatory terms about various groups. At first I assumed that it was accepted usage till I became aware that context determined if the usage was acceptable in public or only in private. I heard many women speak of the hired women who cooked their meals and cared for their children and cleaned their houses in very derogatory fashion but not in front of the people being discussed. America is still racist but publicly so. I no longer hear anyone say, "my best friend is nigger." I do hear that word muttered under one's breath when one feels he is not being deferred to as he expects.
 
 
+2 # tomtom 2015-06-29 01:20
We dehumanize those people we exploit. We do not refer to people we consider equal with derogatory descriptions. I have been hired bcause I am a white male, over more qualified women, blacks, Latinos, people more qualified. Great for me, but, I gained at the expense of of the deserving party. Inferior products and discrimnation, because of bigotry. It's a lose, lose, situation. Hatred is bad for business and humanity.
 

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