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Cole writes: "Nimoy said, 'I reach out to you as someone who is troubled to see the conflict between Israelis and Palestinians continue apparently without an end in sight.'"

Leonard Nimoy in 2013. (photo: Fred Prouser/Reuters)
Leonard Nimoy in 2013. (photo: Fred Prouser/Reuters)


Leonard Nimoy's Last Wishes for Israel and Palestine

By Juan Cole, Informed Comment

28 February 15

 

eonard Nimoy, who played Mr. Spock on Star Trek, speaks out as a Jewish American in favor of a two-state solution and a divided Jerusalem.

Nimoy said,

‘ “I reach out to you as someone who is troubled to see the conflict between Israelis and Palestinians continue apparently without an end in sight.

“In fact, there is an end in sight. It’s known as the two-state solution–a secure, democratic Israel as the Jewish State alongside an independent Palestinian state. Even Israel’s nationalist Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu, has come to see this as the shape of the future. The problem is how to reach that end point. It’s something we should be concerned about–not only as world citizens, but as Americans.

“You might recall the episode in the original Star Trek series called, Let That Be Your Last Battlefield. Two men, half black, half white, are the last survivors of their peoples who have been at war with each other for thousands of years, yet the Enterprise crew could find no differences separating these two raging men.

“But the antagonists were keenly aware of their differences–one man was white on the right side, the other was black on the right side. And they were prepared to battle to the death to defend the memory of their people who died from the atrocities committed by the other.

“The story was a myth, of course, and by invoking it I don’t mean to belittle the very real issues that divide Israelis and Palestinians. What I do mean to suggest is that the time for recriminations is over. Assigning blame over all other priorities is self-defeating. Myth can be a snare. The two sides need our help to evade the snare and search for a way to compromise.

“The Middle East is only getting more tumultuous. The upheavals throughout the region show that what happens in the Middle East can’t help but affect us in the United States. This year, we’ve seen oil prices rise sharply and America become involved militarily in Libya. The cost to American lives and our economy continues to rise at a time when unemployment and deficits are sapping our country’s strength.” ‘

Nimoy’s letter is at Americans for Peace Now.

Relevant is this video of Nimoy speaking on the Jewish values in Star Trek:

Leonard Nimoy. (photo: juancole.com)
Leonard Nimoy. (photo: juancole.com)

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+60 # ronnewmexico 2015-02-28 13:11
A good good man, I regret his passing.

To no surprise we see in the main only his superficial side displayed at this moment.
Star trek….it was what made him famous…but it was not the bigger part of the man by any means.
This type of thing here displayed and his visual art... clearly was.
 
 
+39 # fredboy 2015-02-28 14:49
He was right.

There can never be peace in a land of fear and hatred.
 
 
+18 # Secular Humanist 2015-03-01 01:54
So we must find ways to allay the fears and reconcile the hatred.
 
 
+40 # goodsensecynic 2015-02-28 15:14
On March 3, 2019, we will mark the 100th anniversary of a letter sent by Saudi Prince Feisal to Zionist leader (and future US Supreme Court Justice) Felix Frankfurter.

See: http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/History/FeisalFrankfurterCorrespondence.html

Feisel correctly identifies the problem faced by Arabs and Jews and correctly points the way to a successful future. Writes Feisal:

"We feel that the Arabs and Jews are cousins in having suffered similar oppressions at the hands of powers stronger than themselves ...

[O]ur two movements complete one another. The Jewish movement is national and not imperialist. Our movement is national and not imperialist, and there is room ... for us both. Indeed I think that neither can be a real success without the other."

Seems about right to me.
 
 
+27 # Misterioso 2015-02-28 16:31
"The Jewish movement is...not imperialist."

As Feisal soon learned, au contraire. From the very get go, Zionism was imperialist. As their writings attest, Herzl and other early Zionists made this very clear.

Indeed, the 1947-49 war in Palestine proved that Zionists intended to and succeeded in creating a racist, exclusivist, expansionist "Jewish state" in historic Palestine through vastly superior armed might, several massacres, mass rape and intimidation.

Even before Polish born David Ben-Gurion (nee, David Gruen) declared the state of Israel on May 15/48, Jewish forces had already dispossessed and expelled 500,000 Palestinians, which led to necessary intervention by out gunned and out manned Arab state armies. During the ensuing war, Jewish forces and the IDF seized 78% of Palestine, drove out a further 500,000 Palestinians, destroyed over 500 of their towns and villages, including churches, mosques and cemeteries.

Also, before and during its first invasion of Egypt in 1956, in collusion with Britain and France, Israel drove out a further 30,000 Palestinians. And during and after the war it launched on 5 June 1967, Israel seized the rest of Palestine and expelled an additional 250,000 Palestinians (as well as about 200,000 Syrians and Egyptians.)
 
 
-4 # Diane_Wilkinson_Trefethen_aka_tref 2015-02-28 20:01
@Misterioso, Part I
Your account of the 1948 war does not dovetail with the article on that war which appears in WikiPedia. Even taking that article with a large dose of salt, it is clear that it was the Arabs, not the Jews, who massively protested the United Nations partition plan for Palestine which was adopted 29-Nov-1947 and it was the Arabs who blockaded Jewish residents in Jerusalem. While it may be true that Israel had imperialistic ambitions, the Arab nations were the initial aggressors in 1947-1948. It was the Arab League that invaded Palestine and it was the League's Secretary-Gener al Azzam Pasha who declared of the Jewish forces, “It does not matter how many there are. We will sweep them into the sea.” As for your claim, “Even before Polish born David Ben-Gurion (nee, David Gruen) declared the state of Israel on May 15/48, Jewish forces had already dispossessed and expelled 500,000 Palestinians,” that seems highly unlikely. There were a large number of Palestinians who fled the area, true, but it seems that those who left prior to 15-May-1948 did so more from their concerns about what was going to happen than that they were expelled by Jewish forces. After the Arab invasion of Palestine in 1948, the number of refugees from Palestine swelled, in large part due to Israel's military successes. Regardless of the precise time table of that war, there was plenty of militaristic posturing by the Arabs and thus good reason for the Jews to fear them.
 
 
+3 # Misterioso 2015-03-02 12:15
1.

Reality:

To be brief:

Re the 1947 Partition Plan:

The Partition Plan, UNGA Resolution 181, November 27/47 was contrary to the UN Charter (i.e., the right of self-determinat ion), the 1941 US/Britain Atlantic Charter ("to see no territorial changes that do not accord with the freely expressed wishes of the peoples concerned") and of course, in violation of the terms of the League of Nations British Class A Mandate, which prohibited partition (as reiterated in the 1939 MacDonald White Paper.) Hence, Britain’s abstention during the vote. As it was passed by the UNGA, Resolution 181 was also recommendatory only, i.e., non-binding. Furthermore, it was never ratified by the UN Security Council!!

Apart from its illegality, the Partition Plan was also grossly unfair to the native Palestinian Arab citizens. Despite massive immigration, which included tens of thousands of illegal immigrants, by 1948, Jews made up just 31% of the population and only about 30% of them were citizens. (Around ten per cent of the Jewish population consisted of native Palestinian Arab Jews who vehemently opposed Zionism.) Arab Palestinian citizens comprised 69% of the population and privately owned (‘mulk khaas’) 48% of the land area of mandated Palestine.

cont'd.
 
 
+2 # Misterioso 2015-03-02 12:23
2.

Total Jewish privately owned land was between six and seven per cent. About 45% of Palestine’s land area was state owned (i.e., by its citizens) and it was comprised of Communal Property ('mashaa'), Endowment Property, ('waqf'), and Government Property, ('miri'.) Nonetheless, outrageously, the Partition Plan’s proposed Jewish state was to consist of 56% of Palestine, including its most fertile areas!! 42% was to be the Arab state and the remaining two per cent, consisting of Jerusalem and Bethlehem, was to be placed under international control, i.e., a corpus separatum.

Rubbing salt into the wound, The United States quashed a proposal based on international law put forth by Arab delegates at the UN that a referendum be conducted in Palestine to determine the wishes of the majority regarding the Partition Plan. The United States also thwarted their request to have the matter referred to the International Court of Justice.

In protest, Palestinians began a general strike on the 2nd of December. The Haganah (the Jewish army, which along with the Irgun, reserves and home guard then totalled about 60,000 soldiers) immediately instituted full mobilization and called upon all Jews in Palestine aged 17 to 25 to register for military service.

With Britain’s announcement on December 8 that it would end the League of Nations Mandate and withdraw from Palestine on May 15, 1948, Jewish forces began intensifying their attacks against Palestinians.

cont'd
 
 
+2 # Misterioso 2015-03-02 12:31
3.

By early April, all manner of modern weapons purchased by the Jewish Agency and its supporters abroad were pouring into Palestine mainly from the Soviet Union (Czechoslovakia ), as well as from the United States, Canada, and elsewhere. In addition, the Jewish Agency was manufacturing weapons inside the country, including flame-throwers, barrel bombs, and the deadly Davidka heavy mortars.

On April 3, 1948 Ben-Gurion ordered the implementation of Plan Dalet – a carefully prepared military operation to drive Arabs out of that portion of Palestine the Partition Plan had proposed as a Jewish state, and to also conquer and “cleanse” as much as possible of the proposed Arab state and Jerusalem (i.e., both West and East Jerusalem/the Old City.)

Along with 32,000 in the Home Guard and 15,000 in the Settlement Police, Jewish forces consisted of 27,000 well armed and well trained regular troops in the Haganah along with 5,000 in the Irgun and 200 in the Stern Gang. Against them stood a mere 3500 poorly armed
ALA volunteers and a handful of Palestinian irregulars.

cont'd
 
 
+2 # Misterioso 2015-03-02 12:42
4.

There was no contest. Palestinian towns and cities fell quickly to Jewish forces who, apart from military might, carried out massacres and utilized rape and intimidation to instill fear in the defenseless Palestinians so they would flee en masse.

During March, 30,000 Palestinians were dispossessed and driven eastward out of West Jerusalem. On April 21, the coastal city of Haifa was attacked and after two days of intense mortar barrages, 67,000 of its essentially defenceless Palestinian Muslim and Christian inhabitants - other than a small number who were forced to run the city's oil refinery to provide Jewish forces with petrol - were expelled. Most made their way to Lebanon where those still alive and their descendants remain to this day.

With only 350 ALA troops and 250 civilian volunteers to protect it, Jaffa was in dire straits and the British did virtually nothing to protect its inhabitants. On April 25, the Irgun began a relentless mortar bombardment that went on for four days. The city’s defenders managed to repel attacks from Tel Aviv, but it was becoming increasingly difficult as they had no long-range weapons and only deteriorated British ammunition previously brought in by boat from Egypt.

By April 29, Jaffa was completely cut off from the rest of Palestine. The British forced the Haganah to open the highway to Jerusalem and the civilian exodus began.

cont'd
 
 
+2 # Misterioso 2015-03-02 12:51
5.

Within a short period more than 70,000 fled for their lives mainly to the West Bank, Jordan and the Gaza Strip, never to return.

As had occurred in Haifa, the citizens of Jaffa were robbed of $billions (U.S.) in assets and possessions, including their homes, businesses, orchards, vehicles, jewellery, works of art, carpets, furniture, safety deposit box contents, currency, etc. Jewish forces also robbed the Arab citizens of other towns, villages and cities such as Acre, Lydda and Ramleh of all they left behind and even personal possessions at gun point as they fled to safety.

Meanwhile, the Haganah seized vast stores of modern weaponry, ammunition and assorted military supplies abandoned throughout the country by the British in their haste to leave.

By early May, Jewish forces were heavily armed. Supplementing other foreign sources, the Haganah had concluded an agreement with Czechoslovakia the previous 14 January for a huge purchase of arms totalling U.S. $12,280,000. Included in the deal were "24,500 rifles, 5,000 light machine guns, 200 medium machine guns, 54 million rounds of ammunition, and 25 Messerschmitts. Before [the] end of the Mandate, at least 10,740 rifles, 1,200 machine guns, 26 field guns, and 11 million rounds of ammunition [had arrived] in Palestine.

On 15 May 1948, when the British Mandate ended and the “Jewish State” of Israel was declared by Ben-Gurion et al.

cont'd
 
 
+1 # Misterioso 2015-03-02 13:10
6.

As of 15 May 1948, Jewish forces had already expelled 400,000 Palestinians.
(Due to a "typo," I erroneously wrote 500,000 in my first posting.)

As a result, although greatly outnumbered with a total of only 17,706 troops (including by then, 3,830 ALA volunteers) versus nearly 80,000 Jewish soldiers and other combatants, and desperately outgunned, Arab state armies reluctantly intervened with the hope of stemming the accelerating ethnic cleansing of Palestinians.

An immediate U.S. proposal to institute a cease-fire was accepted by the Arabs, but rejected by Israel.

During the war which was inevitably lost by the Arabs (as predicted by the Truman administration) , 78 per cent of Palestine was conquered by Jewish forces and the IDF. An additional 400,000 Palestinians were driven out for a total of 800,000 and more than 500 of their towns and villages were destroyed, including churches, mosques, and cemeteries.

I do apologize for the length of this posting. I can assure you, however, that if you consult the documented historical record, you will discover it is an accurate summation of what took place in historic Palestine at the time.

BTW, when it comes to the Israel-Palestin ian/Arab conflict, never rely on Wikipedia.
 
 
+1 # Romi 2015-03-04 10:47
Wikipedia is not the ultimate source of information on anything.
During the first part of the twentieth century, European Jews began immigrating to Palestine. They bought land from the Turkish absentee landlords, and expelled the Palestinian Arabs who lived on worked on those lands. This caused social dislocation and anger at the Jews, which erupted in 1929 in Hebron.
There are many sources of information on the Middle East, and much of the history is very controversial, of course. You simply cannot rely on one single source of information for any subject, and certainly not for something as complicated as the history of Palestine.
 
 
+1 # Romi 2015-03-04 10:49
NOTE: This comment of mine was in reply to a post by "Tref" on 2-28-15.
 
 
+8 # Diane_Wilkinson_Trefethen_aka_tref 2015-02-28 20:02
@Misterioso, Part II
“And during and after the war it launched on 5 June 1967” - While Israel did indeed launch a surprise air strike against Egypt on 05-Jun-1967, your statement makes it seem as if the attack was completely unwarranted when such was apparently not the case. Egypt was massing troops along the Israeli border, having been fed incorrect intelligence by Russia, and Israel, not having received that intelligence, surmised that Egypt was preparing to attack. Did Israel act precipitously? Perhaps. But given that it was the Arabs who were the aggressors in 1948, it is not surprising that Israel did not sit around and wait in 1967.

Even IF it is true that the Arabs were in large part responsible for the hostilities in 1948 and shoulder at least some responsibility for the 1967 war, none of that justifies the treatment of Palestinians by Israel today, nor the reprehensible occupation of Arab lands. Like the Hatfields and the McCoys, like the Irish Catholic/Protes tant struggles, past wrongs, while providing historical perspective, are no justification for present day wrongs.
 
 
+18 # Merlin 2015-02-28 21:24
tref,
The value, interpretation and use of history’s place in today’s world, is not often understood. I’m glad you have brought this to us in your closing statement here:

Even IF it is true that the Arabs were in large part responsible for the hostilities in 1948 and shoulder at least some responsibility for the 1967 war, none of that justifies the treatment of Palestinians by Israel today, nor the reprehensible occupation of Arab lands. Like the Hatfields and the McCoys, like the Irish Catholic/Protes tant struggles, past wrongs, while providing historical perspective, are no justification for present day wrongs.

Beautifully stated, tref.

Thanks!
 
 
+3 # Misterioso 2015-03-02 13:14
Reality regarding the 1967 war.

This time, to actually be brief:


At 7:45 AM on 5 June 1967, Israel attacked Egypt and thereby, Jordan and Syria who each shared a mutual defense pact with Egypt. The attack took place just hours before Egypt's VP was to fly to Washington for a prearranged June 7th meeting with the Johnson administration to defuse the crisis between Egypt and Israel based on an agreement worked out in Cairo between Nasser and Johnson's envoy, Robert Anderson. In a cable sent to Johnson on May 30, Israel’s PM Eshkol promised not to attack Egypt until June 11 to give diplomacy a chance to succeed. However, on June 4, when it heard about the June 7th meeting and the distinct possibility that it would rule out war, Israel’s cabinet ordered its armed forces to attack Egypt the next day. In short, the war was another massive land grab by Israel.

Prime Minister Menachem Begin, Minister without portfolio in Eshkol's cabinet, while addressing Israel's National Defence College on 8 August 1982: "In June, 1967, we again had a choice. The Egyptian army concentrations in the Sinai did not prove that Nasser was really about to attack us. We must be honest with ourselves. We decided to attack him." (New York Times, 21 August 1982)

Meir Amit, chief of Israel's Mossad: "Egypt was not ready for a war and Nasser did not want a war."
 
 
+1 # Romi 2015-03-04 10:53
To say that Arabs "were the aggressors in 1948" is hardly the case. The Haganah, the Irgun Zvai Leumi, the Stern Gang and other Jewish terrorist groups were organizing in the late thirties and forties in order to appropriate Palestinian lands. The famous massacre of Deir Yassin in May of 1948 was effected by the Irgun in order to terrorize Palestinians into leaving, and it was largely successful. New of the massacre, which occurred in a peaceful Arab village outside Jerusalem, was broadcast throughout Palestine by the Jews, and resulted in terrified Arab villagers leaving their homes and farms, sometimes even with food on the table, and fleeing to Jordan and Syria. This was the origin of the Palestine refugee population.
 
 
+25 # vt143 2015-02-28 15:27
R.I.P.
 
 
+15 # reiverpacific 2015-02-28 15:57
Maybe the Spock character wasn't so far-fetched.
I.e. Breed some of the better, more intelligent and peace-oriented homo-Sapiens with a people from another world that have, through innate wisdom, use of creativity rather than suppressing it, willingness to learn and change for the common good, survived their self-anihilativ e, war for power, greed-driven, self-destructiv e phase and we might just get a better blend of being for the planet and beyond.
I know, I know -but I like the concept.
Sail off into the Great Unknowable Mr Nemoy, where your spirit may 'Live Long and Prosper' ad infinitum.
And thanks for many hours of creative and well-played living of a character you brought to life for so many of us, from a lifelong Sci-Fi nut.
 
 
+1 # NAVYVET 2015-03-02 13:37
You've said it for me, Reiverpacific. I've been a sci-fi fan since age 13 (1949) and was so spoiled from reading the real stuff in books and mags that I cared for only one character on the original series--Mr. Spock--and scarcely ever watched it because I couldn't stand to see the ruin of William Shatner's formerly excellent acting ("Brothers Karamazov", "Andersonville" ) and his travesty of the spoiled brat Captain Kirk character I considered suitable only for 11-year-old males. But Nimoy's 3-dimensional nuanced performance kept me interested enough to try the next two resuscitations with fine plots and great ensemble acting ("Next Generation" and especially "Deep Space 9"). They turned out to be among the best TV I've ever watched. Nimoy was the soul of the original series. He will be missed.
 
 
+20 # Questions, questions 2015-02-28 16:05
Thanks for the good thoughts from and for Mr. Nimoy, and the video too.

Reminds me that when I was visiting Sandomierz, Poland a while back, I came across the remains of a Jewish graveyard, in which a courageous/cons cientious non-Jew had gathered up all the broken gravestones and created a memorial displaying them. And lo and behold, on more than one of them were depicted a pair of hands doing the very same "Volcan" salute!

So I thought, either Jews must actually be from Volcan - or that Spock was actually Jewish! With half my relatives being of Jewish ancestry, I'm glad to know for sure that it's the latter. Live long (in our hearts) and prosper, Leonard Nimoy!
 
 
+12 # ericlipps 2015-02-28 16:19
Spock wasn't Jewish, but I believe Leonard Nimoy was, though to my knowledge he never publicly emphasized it.
 
 
+25 # Misterioso 2015-02-28 16:35
To quote the late Mr. Nimoy, “In fact, there is an end in sight. It’s known as the two-state solution–a secure, democratic Israel as the Jewish State alongside an independent Palestinian state. Even Israel’s nationalist Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu, has come to see this as the shape of the future."

Wrong. Bibi Netanyahu has made it very clear that if he has his way, there will never be a sovereign, contiguous state of Palestine. He is also utterly opposed to any sharing of Jerusalem.
 
 
+38 # dquandle 2015-02-28 16:51
Unfortunately, you are correct. Netanyahu wants lebensraum, through mass murder, repression, torture, and an ever increasing, ghettoized Palestinian population whose lands he continues to steal, whose homes he continues to destroy, and whose lives he continues to obliterate.
 
 
+19 # CarolYost 2015-02-28 17:34
Nimoy was Jewish.

The Vulcan salute was based on a gesture of blessing by rabbis. That's why you see it on gravestones.

There shouldn't be a Jewish state any more than a Muslim, Protestant or Catholic state. One state for all, I think, would be fairest. For a Palestinian state you'd have to return a lot of the land the Zionists stole. Besides, Palestinians in the diaspora are still calling for Right of Return.
 
 
+9 # lfeuille 2015-02-28 21:00
Quoting CarolYost:
Nimoy was Jewish.

The Vulcan salute was based on a gesture of blessing by rabbis. That's why you see it on gravestones.

There shouldn't be a Jewish state any more than a Muslim, Protestant or Catholic state. One state for all, I think, would be fairest. For a Palestinian state you'd have to return a lot of the land the Zionists stole. Besides, Palestinians in the diaspora are still calling for Right of Return.


A single state would be dominated by Israelis in the same way that whites dominated South Africa until the end of apartheid. The Palestinians have to be free from that kind of oppression.
 
 
-2 # tgemberl 2015-03-02 11:37
I don't think a right of return is possible. But I do think a single state might be. A state where Palestinians have the same constitutional rights as Jews. In other words, where they can rent and buy property anywhere as Jews can. It would take awhile for Palestinians to improve their lot, but they'd make progress. It would be the same situation blacks faced when they won civil rights in the 60's: an uphill battle, but one where the laws are on your side.

I don't see how a two-state solution is possible because the area is overpopulated. I'm sure part of the reason Israel has built more settlements on the West Bank is that they just can't squeeze all their people in Israel proper.
 
 
-55 # Firebird 2015-02-28 17:38
When are actors going to stick to acting and not act as if they know the cure for every problem facing the world? As demonstrated by the academy awards, a more pronounced group of publically correct fools has never existed, until Hollywood gained a stage far too big for Hollywood’s limited intelligence. Leonard Nemoy was a decent actor, not great, but just ok, nothing more. His views on solving problems in the Middle East are of no value and let us give him what he deserves. Just let him rest in peace, and please does not expect him to solve the world’s problems from the grave.
 
 
+38 # Dust 2015-02-28 18:56
If his views are of no value, why are yours?
 
 
+42 # ronnewmexico 2015-02-28 19:32
I will second that motion in only one regard….

I certainly wish that so so actor, famous for his B films…Ronald Reagan…had stuck with acting..
 
 
+7 # Merlin 2015-02-28 20:46
Yes, Ron,
In my anger toward raygun, and the damage he did, as well as the Kitchen Cabinet he fronted for, I agree with you.

That said, I see the problem as giving anyone a bully pulpit for their views, just because of their celebrity, be that acting, political, sports or what ever. The result of doing this, however, is the somewhat automatic punishment we gain, by idolizing those we set up as better than ourselves.

Their views, which only represent their own view of the world, are magnified and blown out of shape by the public, via the media, into something that has great importance, because in our “fantasy” we see that person as more than he really is.

In reality, Leonard Nemoy is a man with an opinion, that you can agree with or not. To give his opinion, or any opinion from some celebrity, greater weight than any one of ours, simply because of that celebrity, is denigrating ourselves, and raising that person to the level of a “god.”
 
 
+14 # ronnewmexico 2015-02-28 21:09
I see it in a different way. Not that his view is superior to any others…. but in that he did a public service in expressing his view.

We may argue the pros and cons to his view, as we are doing here, which is necessary and called for.
But to express view especially on such a subject, as the man had no intention to run for office, could not possibly gain anything of monetary value by expressing that…says something of the man.

He cared. He offered view apparently as he cared.
That is more important in my opinion than parsing the particular view. I think the view is a solid one and a well thought one. A perfect opinion on the subject…no. He is no scholor, nor student of the middle east.

I would go to Norman Finkelstein, if I were to go to a person for a opinion to craft as mine personally.

However he cared enough to offer solution when it could only clearly be to his professional and public detriment.
Professionally he would be much better served to do as many do ….say nothing.

So he was a good man for doing that.
 
 
+33 # Diane_Wilkinson_Trefethen_aka_tref 2015-02-28 20:06
I would submit that Leonard Nemoy had as much right to express his views publicly as we all do here on RSN. There is nothing "great" about us either.
 
 
+19 # lfeuille 2015-02-28 21:01
Quoting Firebird:
When are actors going to stick to acting and not act as if they know the cure for every problem facing the world? As demonstrated by the academy awards, a more pronounced group of publically correct fools has never existed, until Hollywood gained a stage far too big for Hollywood’s limited intelligence. Leonard Nemoy was a decent actor, not great, but just ok, nothing more. His views on solving problems in the Middle East are of no value and let us give him what he deserves. Just let him rest in peace, and please does not expect him to solve the world’s problems from the grave.


Actors are citizens like everyone else. They have as much right to speak out as you do.
 
 
+7 # reiverpacific 2015-03-01 14:35
Quoting Firebird:
When are actors going to stick to acting and not act as if they know the cure for every problem facing the world? As demonstrated by the academy awards, a more pronounced group of publically correct fools has never existed, until Hollywood gained a stage far too big for Hollywood’s limited intelligence. Leonard Nemoy was a decent actor, not great, but just ok, nothing more. His views on solving problems in the Middle East are of no value and let us give him what he deserves. Just let him rest in peace, and please does not expect him to solve the world’s problems from the grave.


Well well -a real smart-butt smug comment from what appears to be an armchair activist.
The LEADERS of most countries, mostly lawyers, ex-military, or other power-seekers, are doin' a fuckin' bang-up job, aint they!
What gives you the knowledge or authority to criticize Nemoy's acting, based on one character?
I grew up close to the theater at it highest and humblest levels, am a literature/reci tal buff, have done a bit o' mumming myself, and I found his work excellent.
So you have no problem with Ron Raygun, at best a mediocre B-movie actor (and a fink in Hollywood for the McCarthy era witch-hunts), or Arnie Schwartzenneger (sp?); they didn't exactly keep it to themselves, did they now?!
It's generally acknowledged in the creative community everywhere, that part of an artist of any type's job is to challenge and expose the status-quo and it's hubris!
Gotcha!
 
 
+19 # cordleycoit 2015-02-28 19:16
Strange artists, actors, can find peace and brotherhood-sis terhood. Politicians,ban kers and preachers can only kill. Something is missing.
 
 
+4 # Bruce Gruber 2015-03-01 07:23
Entertainers enjoy a much wider experience than their public. Politicians often seek association with their popularity and exposure. The headiness of stardom attracts political sycophants whose "public" responsibilitie s require that 'image' and 'role' are politically repressed. Artists and actors enjoy the 'game' of portraying alternative and conflicting realities. Politicians, on the other hand, must maintain image and performance constrained by constituent perception of fellowship and agreement.

"Hollywood" is often construed as "liberal" by conservatives. Resentment of the freedom to be curious, dismissive of 'respect' for authority, and critical of institutions undermines confidence in values, traditions and faith in goodness, morality and simplicity - characteristics difficult to defend against the backdrop of reality.
 
 
+5 # Bruce Gruber 2015-03-01 07:35
When 'actors' accept, portray and live those simplicities as real, their performance become uncomplicated. Ronald Reagan simplified the Presidency to a black and white performance typical of "20 mule team borax". Oblivious to the subtle nuances of reality and the complexity and diversity of human civilization, his chauvinism masked the more subtle intent of his handlers.

There is great difference between 'political' actors whose performance panders to a perceived base of public agreement and actors who share their awareness and experience outside their performance to share their perception of reality for the entertainment and education of their public. Their expanded 'view' of reality has been manipulated and propagandized - "simplified", if you will, to weave 'brown' shirts for nearly half our American society.

Israel v Palestine, Democracy (sic) v Communism, Christianity v Islam, 'White' v Black, 'Takers' v job creators, Us v The Other, profit v taxation ... all typify this simplistic camouflage of self-righteous conflict and obstruction against consideration of accommodation ... of humanity. Is not EVERY Prophetic admonition against the concept of "winner Take ALL" ... and in favor of "ALL should be winners"?
 
 
+3 # Shades of gray matter 2015-03-02 01:49
We have to grapple with the fact that many powerful people believe they are best served by an Israel always at war with her neighbors. They are not going to be talked out their "hatred." Gain is what motivates them, not emotions. War serves many interests, especially profits and CONTROL.
 
 
0 # Shmegetti 2015-03-02 17:16
This is to respond to Misterioso and others, there is much that I could contradict in your "facts" but that's not the point.
As Nimoy mentioned when referring to an Episode of Star Trek :
"But the antagonists were keenly aware of their differences–one man was white on the right side, the other was black on the right side. And they were prepared to battle to the death to defend the memory of their people who died from the atrocities committed by the other".
“The story was a myth, of course, and by invoking it I don’t mean to belittle the very real issues that divide Israelis and Palestinians. What I do mean to suggest is that the time for recriminations is over. Assigning blame over all other priorities is self-defeating. Myth can be a snare. The two sides need our help to evade the snare and search for a way to compromise". I do believe that is the way forward and that is what the article is about. Live Long and Prosper Misterioso!
 
 
+1 # Robyn 2015-03-03 16:17
Leonard Nimoy was a great actor and a fine man. His wish for both Israel and Palestine was sincere. R.I.P Mr Nimoy, you will be missed.
 

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