RSN Fundraising Banner
FB Share
Email This Page
add comment
Print

Gibson writes: "We look tremendously foolish to the rest of the world when we try to dictate how other countries should behave, considering the vast number of critical problems the US faces internally."

Secretary of State John Kerry. (photo: Michael Springer/Getty Images)
Secretary of State John Kerry. (photo: Michael Springer/Getty Images)


Nine Reasons Our Foreign Policy Makes Us Look Like Complete Hypocrites

By Carl Gibson, Reader Supported News

24 June 14

 

n Chapter 7 of the Book of Matthew, during Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount, Jesus talks directly to hypocrites who judge the actions of others while being oblivious to their own faults.

“How can you say to your brother, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ and behold, the log is in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your brother’s eye.” 
– Matthew, Chapter 7, verses 4 and 5

Our political leadership should take some cues from this passage as we approach a solution to deal with the turmoil of Russia’s intrusion into Ukraine, Iraq’s impending downfall that came as a direct result of our past meddlings, and other foreign policy crises to come. We look tremendously foolish to the rest of the world when we try to dictate how other countries should behave, considering the vast number of critical problems the US faces internally.

Here are a few logs the US should take out of its own eye before telling Iraq and Russia how to handle the specks in theirs.

1. We have the worst health care system in the developed world.

A recent study showed that of the top Western industrialized nations, the United States has the worst health care system. That’s no surprise, considering that only in the US is it acceptable for the illness and injury of citizens to be a commodity from which others can profit. To put this into perspective, the average hip replacement in the US costs $40,364. In Spain, that same operation costs $7,731. This means one can fly to Spain, live in Madrid for two years, learn Spanish, run with the bulls, get trampled, get their hip replaced again, and fly back to the US while still coming out ahead. Britain’s National Health Services came out on top of the survey, as citizens who are critically ill or injured can get life-saving medical treatment and be sent home just as a result of paying taxes.

2. We intentionally saddle college students with a lifetime of debt servitude.

The student debt bubble has now surpassed the $1.2 trillion mark, which is even more than America’s accumulated credit card debt. This is a direct result of states investing less in public higher education and making students pay for the bulk of their education. And because wages are already so low, student loans are, in many cases, used for basic survival rather than tuition payments. The average amount of debt each college graduate owes is just under $30,000. This means that even if a student manages to secure a job in an economy where there at least two applicants for every job opening, it will take years of consistent payments for that graduate to be in the black again.

To contrast, most other developed Western nations allow students to go to college for little to no cost of their own, seeing the education of a citizen as an investment in the country’s well-being. When Quebec proposed a tuition increase from $2,200 to $3,800 over a six-year period, hundreds of thousands of students took to the streets in protest.

3. We effectively have an oligarchy, where the rich can buy their own politicians.

The idea of the US invading Iraq to “spread democracy” is laughable, considering the complete absence of democracy in our own country. In a country of 310,000,000 people, we have a body of a little over 500 people making decisions on the behalf of all of us. Most of those few hundred people are millionaires. And most of the time, these millionaires who supposedly represent us spend more time – roughly 30 to 70 percent of it – with other millionaires, courting donations for their next re-election campaign, than they do listening and responding to the needs of their constituents. One study from Princeton University concluded that the US government in its current form has more in common with an oligarchy – where a small number of wealthy people run the government – than a democracy. Another study found that members of Congress were more free to schedule meetings with people who identified as donors than with people who identified as constituents. It isn’t hard to see why there’s such an uptick of “insurgents” in Iraq who don’t want to see the US spread what we call “democracy” in their country.

4. We punish poor people for enduring the circumstances we forced them into.

In Detroit, Dan Gilbert, the billionaire owner of Quicken Loans, became known as "Subprime Dan" when he made a killing before the burst of the housing bubble by pressuring homeowners into risky subprime loans. Since the 2008 housing market crash, roughly 60,000 Detroit homeowners have been forced to vacate their homes, which has led to massive urban blight and enabled billionaires like Dan Gilbert to buy those homes for pennies on the dollar to gentrify and develop into housing that only the rich can afford.

Now, the few Detroiters who are still lucky to have a place to live are paying increasingly higher rates for water, and in the down economy of Detroit, many have fallen behind on water payments. The city of Detroit has responded by shutting off water for 150,000 households, and is doing so at a rapid rate of 1,500 to 3,000 houses per week. When Detroit raised $1 billion in bonds to pay for infrastructure like water in 2011, Detroit’s unelected emergency manager Kevyn Orr, appointed by bank-friendly governor Rick Snyder, allowed big banks to take a big $537 million bite in interest payments. Even after the big industries made a profit by shipping jobs overseas, and the big banks made a profit by swindling people out of their homes, Detroit’s corporate-owned government won’t allow people owing as little as $150 in water payments to have access to a basic human right.

Another example: a poor single mother in New York had landed a job interview, but no babysitter for her two children, ages 6 and 2, was available during the time scheduled for the interview. She had no choice but to leave her two children in the car for 70 minutes. After the interview, she was arrested for alleged child endangerment. And just recently, child protective services took the two children away from their mother for this alleged endangerment. To sum it up, a woman doing everything she could to earn an income to support her family was punished to the point of having her family taken from her, simply because she couldn’t find a babysitter for 70 minutes.

We have an economy that rewards the rich for being rich, and punishes the poor for being poor. Is it any wonder that foreigners scoff at Americans who say their country is the best in the world?

5. We allow a rape epidemic on our college campuses to go unchecked.

On American college campuses, an average of 1 in 5 women will experience sexual assault. And this is just taking into account the number of instances which are actually reported. The number is likely much greater, because reporting a rape and reliving the traumatic experience for campus authorities is itself a daunting task.

In one case of a student at James Madison University in Virginia, her assailants, who actually recorded video of their sexual assault, were allowed to graduate on time before being expelled from university grounds. The survivor of the assault saw her grades drop as a result of the trauma she suffered, and she lost her financial aid. She had no choice but to drop out.

Why should anyone take our claims of making their country safer at all seriously, when we can’t even make our college campuses safe for women?

6. We send people off to die, and don’t take care of the ones who come back alive.

While politicians reserve two months out of the year, May and November, to honor war veterans, they fail to back up their words with effective policies. After the recent VA scandal that culminated in General Eric Shinseki resigning as the sacrificial lamb, Congress has yet to do anything meaningful to address the years-long backlog that stands between veterans and the health care they earned through their service. But that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

On any given night, there are between 130,000 and 200,000 veterans sleeping on the streets, according to the National Coalition for the Homeless. And every time Congress has had an opportunity to address the plight of veterans, it’s been filibustered by Republicans. In 2010, Senator Patty Murray’s bill to provide aid for homeless veterans with children was filibustered by Mitch McConnell. A bill that would have spent $1 billion to hire veterans for jobs in the public sector was filibustered by 40 senate Republicans in 2012. And just this past February, Senate Republicans once again blocked a bill aimed at providing health care and education to veterans.

The fact that neocons are once again clamoring for troops in Iraq, while they continue to deny returning veterans the help they need and deserve, proves that at least one of the two major parties sees our troops only as cannon fodder not worth a penny if they manage to survive the battlefield. I can’t imagine any country seriously believes we care about their welfare given the way we treat our own war veterans.

7. We make it profitable to systematically incarcerate poor people and minorities.

In America, incarceration is a profitable enterprise. Counties in rural areas hard up for cash are willing to guarantee a certain percentage of occupancy for private prisons, meaning that law enforcement is working extra hard to fill the jails by any means necessary. Usually, this involves heavily patrolling communities of color and low-income neighborhoods, and busting young black men and women for negligible amounts of marijuana. Portugal has done the opposite with great results – a decade ago, the country decided to approach drug addiction as a public health issue rather than a crime, and treated addicts instead of sending them to jail. As a result, Portugal’s addiction rate has gone down by half in the last decade.

The drug war costs us an estimated $20 billion dollars per year from both federal and state governments, while drugs have only been made more widely-available in the process. The continued war on drugs has led to the United States having more black men in prison than there were black men as slaves in the Confederate South. And in a sad parallel to slavery, private prisons are now essentially contractors for major corporations, where work that once paid a livable wage to a unionized employee has been “insourced” to prisoners who do the work for pennies. It’s laughable for the US to deplore slavery in other countries while allowing it to continue at home.

8. We cut our own public services while letting billion-dollar corporations dodge taxes.

Our infrastructure was given a “D+” by architects and engineers, who say our roads and bridges are badly in need of repairs. Our failure to invest properly in public education means our kids are falling far behind students in other countries who are learning much more than we are. And we’ve allowed the last line of hope for the long-term unemployed to be cut off permanently, as Congressional Republicans refuse to extend unemployment compensation for the hardest-hit victims of the economy, saying we “can’t afford” the social safety net. Congressional Republicans also succeeded in cutting the food stamp program by billions of dollars in the last farm bill.

But while Republicans are running around screaming about the deficit, they somehow ignore the more than $100 billion in tax revenue we lose every year through corporate tax loopholes. Major corporations like GE, Bank of America, Wells Fargo, Boeing, Verizon, and dozens of others have paid $0 in federal taxes for several years now, even getting tax refunds in the hundreds of millions instead of paying federal taxes. While there has been extensive awareness about the prevalence of tax loopholes like transfer pricing schemes like the “Double Irish” and the “Dutch Sandwich,” and while there’s been plenty of news about corporations like Apple having more untaxed cash than the U.S. Treasury, members of Congress owned by these same corporations turn a blind eye to this hemorrhaging of funds.

The people of Iraq and Ukraine have reason to scoff when we say we care about building up their public infrastructure, given the neglect those same political leaders have shown about American infrastructure.

9. Our police forces have become unaccountable paramilitary organizations.

As the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have wound down, all the surplus military equipment not getting used in the battlefield is being used at home, by local police forces. All a municipal police department has to do is apply for a grant through the Department of Homeland Security, and it can get tanks, drones, firepower, armor, water cannons, flash bang grenades, LRAD sound devices, and other equipment that has no purpose enforcing the law amongst civilians. As the crackdown on the Occupy movement showed, this military equipment is often used to suppress the democratic rights of citizens nonviolently assembling in public spaces.

When countries like Egypt or Russia use military equipment to suppress peaceful citizen protests, our government is the first to condemn it. But through the continued auspices of the “War on Terror,” our government has sanctioned everything from the mass surveillance of calls and emails to the indefinite detention of US citizens in military jail under the flimsiest of accusations. How can America “bring freedom” to another country when American citizens live under the thumb of a militarized police state?

Before we start sending off troops to bring all the wonderful things we love about America to the rest of the world, maybe we should tend to our own affairs first. Let’s take the log out of our own eye before we talk about the speck in the eye of other countries.



Carl Gibson, 26, is co-founder of US Uncut, a nationwide creative direct-action movement that mobilized tens of thousands of activists against corporate tax avoidance and budget cuts in the months leading up to the Occupy Wall Street movement. Carl and other US Uncut activists are featured in the documentary "We're Not Broke," which premiered at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival. He currently lives in Madison, Wisconsin. You can contact him at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , and follow him on twitter at @uncutCG.

Reader Supported News is the Publication of Origin for this work. Permission to republish is freely granted with credit and a link back to Reader Supported News.

e-max.it: your social media marketing partner
 

Comments   

A note of caution regarding our comment sections:

For months a stream of media reports have warned of coordinated propaganda efforts targeting political websites based in the U.S., particularly in the run-up to the 2016 presidential election.

We too were alarmed at the patterns we were, and still are, seeing. It is clear that the provocateurs are far more savvy, disciplined, and purposeful than anything we have ever experienced before.

It is also clear that we still have elements of the same activity in our article discussion forums at this time.

We have hosted and encouraged reader expression since the turn of the century. The comments of our readers are the most vibrant, best-used interactive feature at Reader Supported News. Accordingly, we are strongly resistant to interrupting those services.

It is, however, important to note that in all likelihood hardened operatives are attempting to shape the dialog our community seeks to engage in.

Adapt and overcome.

Marc Ash
Founder, Reader Supported News

 
+35 # BobboMax 2014-06-24 09:41
I remember, when I was about twelve, thinking how lucky I was to be an American, a citizen of the finest country in the world.
 
 
+11 # Firefox11 2014-06-24 17:48
Quoting BobboMax:
I remember, when I was about twelve, thinking how lucky I was to be an American, a citizen of the finest country in the world.

Yes, I also remember; however, unfortunately "those were the days"...
 
 
+8 # Buddha 2014-06-25 11:30
And it requires the naivete and ignorance of a 12 year old to believe contrary to all statistics that we are the "finest country in the world". Some grow up and learn the truth, some stay with the infantile cluelessness of "American exceptionalism" .
 
 
+30 # fredboy 2014-06-24 09:45
Could also replace the word "Hypocrites" in the headline and replace it with "Idiots."

And date it 1960-present.
 
 
+38 # indian weaver 2014-06-24 10:06
I'd use the terms "fascist terrorists" to define / describe our congress and administration stooges, bought by GE and Halliburton, BofA and JP Morgan, sold out criminals who have to go bye bye asap, one way or another.
 
 
+5 # grandma lynn 2014-06-25 22:06
What about when elected leaders in other countries are chastised verbally by our D.C. leaders as "unresponsive" to their people? Ours sit there, wealthy and well-coifed, suited up and secure, and are unresponsive to OUR needs. I like that point #8 (appreciate / like) that we "cut our public services while letting billion-dollar corporations dodge taxes." I hope we are in some peaceful transition time where the party system will roll over and become better at doing what it is supposed to do, be transformed. I do want it to be peaceful and not a bloody revolution.
 
 
+20 # Kootenay Coyote 2014-06-24 11:29
No, ADD 'idiots'.
 
 
+46 # Blackjack 2014-06-24 10:03
We LOOK like hypocrites because we ARE hypocrites! Our collective behavior is similar to that of someone with a psychological problem that they don't want to address: meddle in everyone else's problems in order to avoid dealing with their own!
 
 
+6 # Firefox11 2014-06-24 17:50
Projection, denial, passive-aggress ive syndrome.
 
 
-55 # MidwesTom 2014-06-24 10:06
I disagree with the first point. If we have the worst healthcare system in the world, why does Mayo Clinic maintain a giant hotel complex (complete with foreign government offices, to house the many international patients who go there for treatment?

Why have most of the medical advances of the past 50 years come from the United States?

I do not see foreign health entities setting up shop here, which one would thank that they might if our system is the worst.
 
 
+56 # BobboMax 2014-06-24 10:53
Tom,

There are clearly islands of excellence in the US health care system, but, in general, you have to have a yacht to get to them, or get lucky and find the right charity. Have you tried getting a room at the Mayo Hotel? The judgments about cost and efficacy apply to all 310 million of us, as taxpayers and patients.

Per capita, Cuba spends 1/10th what we do for health care, with comparable outcomes. Of course, as someone pointed out, that's partly because they're too poor to eat Big Macs. Per capita, the French spend about half what we do, for a health care system that is considered to be the best in the world in almost EVERY aspect- accessibility, longevity, infant mortality, overall level of citizen health and happiness.

On an absolute level, we have a mediocre health care system. On a cost/benefit level, we have one of the worst (unless you happen to be an exec in a big health care org.)
 
 
+3 # grandma lynn 2014-06-25 22:11
Right on - the comment about "too poor to eat Big Macs." Maybe part of our leadership faults in D.C. is that we are left sidelined as anything to be concerned for. My "we" is the most of the people who haven't been educated enough to get it, about healthy lifestyle.

Right now I have a newly-hatched chick who seems to have three hens claiming it, jointly. All three mothers guide that chick around for food and water. By contrast, our "hens" in D.C. ignore the needy "littles" out here in the hinterlands they so-called represent.
 
 
+19 # Kootenay Coyote 2014-06-24 11:32
Q1. ' If we have the worst healthcare system in the world, why does Mayo Clinic...'

A. Because the Rich can pay, & that supports a trickle-down of charity.

Q2. 'Why have most of the medical advances of the past 50 years...'.

A. Nobody problem. But how much reaches most of the needy?
 
 
+17 # Yakpsyche 2014-06-24 13:00
Not absent any places with good care or good docs, like Mayo Clinic, but the worst health care SYSTEM.

The word, system, is key. It refers to the whole network of everything: availability, insurance, cost management and containment, patient outcomes, overall costs, etc. etc.

If one clinic is good it doesn't change the fact that, in comparison to the overall systems in other countries, our overall system is quite poor.
 
 
+2 # JustSayin 2014-06-27 14:16
Quoting Yakpsyche:
Not absent any places with good care or good docs, like Mayo Clinic, but the worst health care SYSTEM.

The word, system, is key. It refers to the whole network of everything: availability, insurance, cost management and containment, patient outcomes, overall costs, etc. etc.

If one clinic is good it doesn't change the fact that, in comparison to the overall systems in other countries, our overall system is quite poor.


There are some incredible health care PROVIDERS in the US but your statement about our SYSTEM, unfortunately, is quite true. MN has the Mayo, OH has the Cleveland Clinic, MA has Mass General and it's affiliates, MD has Johns Hopkins, and on and on. But all of them have their limits for capacity and all are located in metropolitan areas. Most Americans cannot access those places, especially absent financial assistance.
 
 
+8 # ctcarole 2014-06-24 13:25
Tom, I've read your comments with interest for some time now. With every comment you invite the wrath of the many progressives who read RSN. It's important for us to know that there are many people who are on the other side of each of the items presented on this site. I have even, from time to time, learned something that the average reader here wouldn't have presented.

If, from time to time, you learn something from our side, we can all become more educated and more efficient.

Keep writing, Tom.
 
 
+8 # Firefox11 2014-06-24 17:53
Quoting MidwesTom:
I disagree with the first point. If we have the worst healthcare system in the world, why does Mayo Clinic maintain a giant hotel complex (complete with foreign government offices, to house the many international patients who go there for treatment?


Why have most of the medical advances of the past 50 years come from the United States?

I do not see foreign health entities setting up shop here, which one would thank that they might if our system is the worst.


You are partially correct; the problem is, Midwest Tom, that all of that wonderful healthcare is generally only available to the rich in this country, or those foreign nationals who can afford to pay. (Shah of Iran, etc.)
 
 
+3 # Buddha 2014-06-25 11:34
My best friend has for over a decade been suffering an unknown condition (abdominal pain, nausea, measurable fever) that comes and goes, potentially tied to an endocrine issue, that doctor after doctor has been stymied at finding the cause. Her doctor suggested she try Mayo, and he even tried on her behalf to get her admitted there...but she was denied...not interesting enough, not rich enough...and she is still suffering. That's our healthcare system.
 
 
+2 # grandma lynn 2014-06-25 22:15
Just wondering - the "over a decade" clue - maybe Monsanto's GMO seeds / food products are toxic to her.

People should look up and read E.B. White's essay, "The Morning of the Day They Did It." Pretty old essay by now, but in it the people have to take monthly injections to protect them from the toxins in our manufactured food.
 
 
0 # JustSayin 2014-06-27 14:08
Providers like the Mayo and Cleveland Clinics are in no way representative of the US healthcare system. I have much experience with the Cleveland Clinic, and I can tell you that not everybody has access to its care, and not all the providers affiliated with it provide any better than average care. The CC has had its share of the world's dignitaries and extremely wealthy patients, yet many US citizens cannot access the same.

What "foreign health entities" are you speaking of? There are plenty of foreign corporations, medical equipment manufacturers, pharmaceutical companies, etc doing business here. As far as health CARE providers, there are likely government barriers that prevent them from setting up shop. Not to mention cultural attitudes. If foreign providers set up shop here they would lose their financial advantages. Their costs would be equivalent to those of US providers. They would be subject to our regulations. And, ceritus parabus, many Americans would not seek healthcare at a facility with a name that sounded like a Thai restaurant. (This is not a racist remark directed at Thailand but more a commentary on Americans' ignorance!)

As far as medical advances coming from the US, can you back that up? We are by no means the only country that can lay claim to "most of" the advances. Even so, many of those advances don't address common health problems because there's little ROI; they couldn't cover research costs w/out healthcare becoming even MORE expensive.
 
 
+16 # harleysch 2014-06-24 10:16
I wonder why, in an otherwise commendable article, Gibson feels compelled to accept the neo-con formulation about the "turmoil of Russia's intrusion into Ukraine...."

This is reflective of a whole other category of hypocrisy, i.e., of U.S. foreign policy. It was a democratically elected government of Ukraine which rejected the European Union. This was followed by a U.S. NATO-run coup, which forced Putin and Russia to react.

To be consistent, the author must not allow a fraudulent media run narrative, which backs the Obama administration' s continuation of the neo-con "regime change" policy, to be slipped in -- especially as the truth, of the Obama administration' s role in provoking a Russian response, offers further proof of the hypocrisy he is highlighting.
 
 
+33 # Justice 4 Everyone 2014-06-24 10:20
Great article, but………

What about a 10th Reason ??

The total lack of engagement on the part of the American public on foreign policy matters !!

There is a conspiracy on the part of the political establishment to not EVER make foreign policy an election issue. If more politicians are challenged BEFORE elections and held to account AFTERWARDS then maybe…….just maybe there will be a move away from a narrow minded military-led hawkish foreign policy where our governments cherry picks which dictatorships to support (Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Israel, Bahrain) and which to BOMB.

I suspect that both the Democrats and Republicans prefer to leave us members of the public believing that foreign policy is not within our purview. So when the ‘Chickens come home to roost’ there is much caterwauling and pious drivel spoken about our enemies ‘being envious of our freedoms’ etc, etc…..When in fact we are left at the mercy of our lying politicians and their shifty cohorts in the military industrial complex.

If there is one lesson we must learn from the Bush/Cheney/Rum sfeld/Wolfowitz era, it is this……….
We must hold ALL our elected officials to account on ALL MATTERS…..DOMES TIC AND FOREIGN !!!
 
 
+6 # James38 2014-06-24 22:11
How about being a Nation with former top leaders who were war criminals and doing nothing to punish them or even openly admit what the rest of the world knows all too well - that "President" G W Bush, Dick Cheney, Condoleezza Rice, Paul Wolfowitz, and several others from that woefully destructive administration were all clearly war criminals.

They created the "War of Lies" in Iraq, and are responsible for all the US troop deaths and injuries, the death of hundreds of thousands of Iraqis, and the present collapse of the country.

The only foreign policy disaster that equals the Iraq fiasco was the Vietnam Debacle, and the US leaders who created that travesty of "Foreign Policy" were also war criminals. They are unfortunately mostly beyond reach, but never punished. Maybe we could muster up a slap on the wrist for Kissinger before he pops off?

We have young people in prison for life for minor drug offenses. How is it we can not find the courage and honesty to let them go, and put Bush and company in their place?
 
 
+3 # grandma lynn 2014-06-25 22:17
I moan and groan about Obama's/Pelosi' s instant announcement, on his election, that investigating Bush / Cheney for getting us into the Iraq war was off the table. We will not know. That was the Obama / Pelosi preference. I worked for the man's election, and that was hard to take. I don't let it go.
 
 
+23 # Citizen Mike 2014-06-24 11:08
One cause of our problems in the USA is that we have no left whatsoever to voice a moral critique of the problems caused by unrestrained greed. Our labor movement and all varieties of socialist opinion were completely suppressed after WWII with the start of the Cold War and vanished completely, never to return.

On the other hand, the nations of Europe continue to have a lively labor-left that actively participates in the political dialogue and is understood to have a legitimate interest in affairs of state.
 
 
+25 # reiverpacific 2014-06-24 11:19
Quoting MidwesTom:
I disagree with the first point. If we have the worst healthcare system in the world, why does Mayo Clinic maintain a giant hotel complex (complete with foreign government offices, to house the many international patients who go there for treatment?

Why have most of the medical advances of the past 50 years come from the United States?

I do not see foreign health entities setting up shop here, which one would thank that they might if our system is the worst.

This is the only country in the world that has the gall to call itself advanced, in which one can be bankrupted by healthcare bills and indeed this is one of the main reasons for bankruptcy nationwide; -and that's WITH insurance.
I write from bitter personal experience.
If it's not for everybody it's to a system.
And what's the point of making allegedly medical advances if they're not available to the entire population -and can you back this up? Given y'r long history of wildly speculative, provenly wrong and miles off target posts on RSN, y'r credibility is pretty damn low around here: you obviously have a pretty thick skin and brass neck just to keep posting on RSN and expecting us to take these broad-brushed blanket statements as facts.
Only a head-in-the-san d smug, blinkered self-opinionate d chypher insists on defending the indefensible.
 
 
-28 # Roland 2014-06-24 11:45
You are correct, that the way our health care system is set up, it isn’t perfect and the problem with bankruptcy is a black mark against it. However, I would rather be bankrupt than dead. It appears we have among the best equipment and doctors in the world. I believe that if the govt. wasn’t so heavily involved in healthcare (worse now with Obamacare) it wouldn’t be so expensive. Very similar to how the govt. flooded the higher education market with money and raised the cost of college, so that more people are now dependent on the govt. for college money. And, the tax payer is left holding the bag should this bubble pop.
It would have been better to allow insurance companies to compete and for the govt. to give free care to those who can’t afford it.
I know 2 people who had major injuries without insurance. They didn’t have money. They were treated and the hospitals negotiated their bills down to less than they would pay today for basic insurance. Everyone else in essence, is paying for them. Kind of the same with Obamacare.
 
 
+18 # reiverpacific 2014-06-24 11:56
Quoting Roland:
You are correct, that the way our health care system is set up, it isn’t perfect and the problem with bankruptcy is a black mark against it. However, I would rather be bankrupt than dead. It appears we have among the best equipment and doctors in the world. I believe that if the govt. wasn’t so heavily involved in healthcare (worse now with Obamacare) it wouldn’t be so expensive. Very similar to how the govt. flooded the higher education market with money and raised the cost of college, so that more people are now dependent on the govt. for college money. And, the tax payer is left holding the bag should this bubble pop.
It would have been better to allow insurance companies to compete and for the govt. to give free care to those who can’t afford it.
I know 2 people who had major injuries without insurance. They didn’t have money. They were treated and the hospitals negotiated their bills down to less than they would pay today for basic insurance. Everyone else in essence, is paying for them. Kind of the same with Obamacare.

You and I have been down this road before and disagree entirely about most of't.
See, I've EXPERIENCED both in my crazy, round the world, push the envelope, risky-looney ol' life and the British and Australian systems have saved it twice.
No complaints about the quality of care I've received here -just the costs and dictation of what insurance covers; Hospitals DO have slush funds, which just adds to costs.
'Nuff said.
 
 
+19 # MJnevetS 2014-06-24 13:18
"I believe that if the govt. wasn’t so heavily involved in healthcare (worse now with Obamacare) it wouldn’t be so expensive." What you 'believe' and what the facts are happen to be diametrically opposed. The government, through medicare, delivers healthcare at approximately 1/2 to 1/3 the price of insurers. - FACT. The numbers are irrefutable. That is because the government is not trying to pay the multi-million dollar salary of a CEO. They are also not paying an army of employees who's SOLE FUNCTION IS TO FIGURE A WAY TO DENY A HEALTH CLAIM. Numerous medical providers (nurses and doctors), who eventually stopped 'drinking the koolaid', have come out and admitted that they were paid to opine that no treatment was necessary/warra nted/beneficial when they knew the opposite to be true. As an attorney who currently deals with injured clients, I find it shocking what insurance companies will do to avoid paying for treatment which they are contractually liable to pay for. I have successfully sued insurance companies for this behavior, but they continue to do it because most people just accept the lies, or give up after getting months or even years of run around. Roland, you say that "I would rather be bankrupt than dead", that ignores the flawed thinking that citizens in a civilized country should have to CHOOSE BETWEEN BANKRUPTCY AND DEATH! You call that a 1st world civilized nation? I call that cannibalism. We are devouring our own population!
 
 
+6 # Firefox11 2014-06-24 18:28
The predatory capitalists, not the conscious capitalists, are devouring the people; the U.S. resembles the feudal system of long ago-the rich and the poor. The genius of America used to be the creation of a middle class. We all know what happened to that group.
 
 
-3 # Roland 2014-06-25 19:59
Facts Medicare can't continue as is. Both Ds and Rs have stated that. Medicare has $60B of fraud each year. When you compare costs you aren't counting the fraud which private insurers do a better job of preventing. Of course that costs them money to prevent fraud. Sometimes they may go too far. More and more doctors are refusing to accept Medicare.
 
 
+4 # jky1291 2014-06-26 15:39
Roland, the majority of Medicare fraud is perpetrated by the private contractors who supply services to Medicare, NOT by the less expensive government employees, the majority of whom accept less pay because they are legitimately concerned with providing the best patient care with less resources.
 
 
+4 # angelfish 2014-06-24 12:00
Bravo, reiver, WELL said, Indeed!
 
 
+16 # reiverpacific 2014-06-24 11:30
"Justice 4 Everyone"
Giving you point 10, how about;
11. A media which is almost wholly-owned by the Corporate/Milit ary conglomerates that benefit from censoring news and providing content-free programming as stuffing between ever lengthier commercials as the main point of selling stuff to a "Panem et Circences"-cond itioned populace, inducing a passive, ignorant-of-the world and incurious state of mind that will accept all outrages at home and overseas done allegedly in their name without accountability.
And of course the same media excludes alternative voices from the national debate in maintaining a 1.5-party system by demanding outrageous amounts of spending to be shoveled into their seemingly bottomless, gaping maws by the only "permitted" parties between and leading up to elections thanks to Citizens United.
And then there's a #12 addressing SCOTUS, very much linked to #4 and my own #11.
 
 
+11 # geraldom 2014-06-24 12:11
The U.S. doesn't just look hypocritical in terms of its foreign policy, it is in fact, beyond the shadow of any doubt, hypocritical when it comes to its foreign policy. It is guilty as charged!!
 
 
+10 # reiverpacific 2014-06-24 14:44
Quoting geraldom:
The U.S. doesn't just look hypocritical in terms of its foreign policy, it is in fact, beyond the shadow of any doubt, hypocritical when it comes to its foreign policy. It is guilty as charged!!

Exactly!
Like trotting around the word slapping other countries on the wrist for "Human Rights" abuses when they can't hold a candle to Big Bro', claiming to be a Democracy whilst maintaining treasured close trading alliances with some of the worst abusers and repressors, like Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Myanmar, Suharto's Indonesia, LIKUD's Israel and being responsible for the violent usurpation and overthrow of so many regimes attempting to take a peaceful Democratic path (just start at Iran in 1953 and trace an almost annual example through the latter half of the 20th century even before the long-planned Iraq/Afghanista n debacle), replacing them with Fascist, death-squad enforced military dictators who can only be summed up as "Terrorists" to their own peoples, especially the indigenous ones.
Speaking go indigenous peoples, the US has a pretty heavy criminal record of attempted forced assimilation or genocide in dealing with it's own.
Pity that John Kerry, now a billionaire (how DID he pull THAT off whilst in office) even outside of his wife's Heinz heiress fortune, turned to the dark side after having so much courage to speak truth to the same powers that ruined Vietnam for corporate skullduggery.
Maybe THAT's how he got his wealth?
 
 
-29 # Roland 2014-06-24 12:11
Like the author of this article, I would also hate the US, if I believed what he does. Fortunately, most of what he says is either untrue or he leaves out important information. Just one example he rants about GE not paying taxes. GE paid no taxes that year because they had losses carried forward and tax credits from our govt. to encourage clean energy. I thought liberals here would be fine with those tax credits.
 
 
-31 # Roland 2014-06-24 12:22
Article reminds me of this quote -
Ronald Reagan — 'It isn't so much that liberals are ignorant. It's just that they know so many things that aren't so.'
 
 
+13 # reiverpacific 2014-06-24 13:36
Quoting Roland:
Article reminds me of this quote -
Ronald Reagan — 'It isn't so much that liberals are ignorant. It's just that they know so many things that aren't so.'

He also said "Ketchup is a vegetable"!
Mainstream Republicans argue that the Tea Party is disgracing Reagan's legacy. But they're forgetting how Reagan created the template and blueprint for them.
Reagan was the first president to brazenly place foxes in charge of the henhouses at the Cabinet level. Reagan Attorneys General Edwin Meese and William French Smith viciously attacked the very civil rights and equal protection laws they were charged with upholding.
Reagan made a deal with the regime of Ayatollah Khomeini in advance of the 1980 Election, in order to ensure that the American hostages would remain in captivity until after the election.
Under Reagan, the US went from being the world's largest creditor to being the largest debtor nation. Until Reagan, a balanced budget was a sacred cow of the Republican philosophy.
Pretty good for a lousy "B" Movie actor who fooled so many into simplistic "Aw shucks" rationalization for many ills and was a fink for McCarthy's Auto-da-fé.
I'll give you a personal variation on y'r Ronnie-quote back: "It's not so much that Reactionaries (I differentiate such from Conservatives) are ignorant. It's just that if it's true they'll bend it out of shape and if it's false, they'll use it for their own ends anyway".
Feel free to quote me thus anytime.
 
 
+7 # Doll 2014-06-24 14:29
And tomatoes aren't even a vegetable; they are a fruit.

Another Reaganism: Trees pollute.
 
 
-6 # Roland 2014-06-24 15:32
Maybe, the “there you go again” quote is appropriate. I don’t believe he ever said “ketchup is a vegetable”. I know some people in his administration were working “to provide more flexibility in meal planning to local school lunch administrators coping with National School Lunch Plan subsidy cuts enacted by the Omnibus Regulation Acts of 1980 and 1981.[1][2] The regulations allowed administrators the opportunity to credit items not explicitly listed that met nutritional requirements”. Someone else may have said that, but their goof was corrected and I don’t believe it was ever uttered by Reagan. If I am wrong please send reply with the info.
Also, didn’t his spending improve our military and bankrupt Russia. Didn’t that win the cold war? Didn’t that give Clinton his peace dividend which allowed him to cut spending and have a surplus?
Didn’t the economy do well under him?
 
 
+10 # MJnevetS 2014-06-24 13:50
The quote which you paraphrased above was taken from a televised address to the nation on behalf of Barry Goldwater, October 27, 1964. It was written by his (or Goldwater's) Speech writers and was actually cribbed from a 19th century humorist, Josh Billings, who wrote ""It ain't ignorance causes so much trouble; it's folks knowing so much that ain't so."

Reagan also said (when attempting to co-opt another famous quote) "Facts are stupid things." - (at the 1988 Republican National Convention, attempting to quote John Adams, who said, "Facts are stubborn things". There is a Freudian slip if there ever was one!). He also said "Trees cause more pollution than automobiles." and after a visit south of the border: "Well, I learned a lot....I went down to (Latin America) to find out from them and their views. You'd be surprised. They're all individual countries", Further, the foregoing quote is not a jest, it is ignorance. In an interview with Barbara Walters, November 27, 1981 Reagan admitted that as far as his scholastic grades: "I never knew anything above Cs."

However, Reagan's intellectual prowess can be summed up by what foreign leaders said about him during meetings with him as a sitting president: "What planet is he living on?" -President Mitterand of France poses this question about Reagan to Canadian Prime Minister Trudeau. The man was a 'pretty face' with an empty head, who was able to be operated like a puppet.
 
 
+3 # Firefox11 2014-06-24 18:31
Ronald Reagan....hmmmm , the fantasy conservative.
 
 
+4 # Firefox11 2014-06-24 18:31
Were the losses the kind that Enron claimed with its creative bookkeeping, or Chevron and oil companies have claimed for years while making billions on the side?
 
 
-11 # Roland 2014-06-24 18:54
Which losses? The oil companys pay a lot of taxes.
 
 
+8 # reiverpacific 2014-06-24 20:04
Quoting Roland:
Which losses? The oil companys pay a lot of taxes.

Are you kiddin'?
The oil companies dodge more taxes that they pay if -any and don't even come close to restoring or being penalized for the environmental damage they do and do bugger-all to fix, in spite of BP, Texaco, Exxon and the other's hugey expensive Filick'rin' screen commercials (which they doubtless get to write off'n their taxes as "marketing") to the contrary.
You're terribly naive if you buy all that stuff me oul' darlin'.
 
 
-2 # Roland 2014-06-24 20:32
Where do the people here get their info. Oh, thats rignt - here. Hence the problem. Exxon Mobil pays the most taxes of any US corporation followed by Chevron, http://www.forbes.com/pictures/mef45kghl/1-exxon-mobil/
Go to this link and see the tax rates for them You will be surprised.
 
 
0 # grandma lynn 2014-06-25 22:19
Cannot be. GE doesn't have such losses as described here. What is the source of your statement?
 
 
+1 # Roland 2014-06-26 21:54
Just google - ge losses led to paying no taxes - and you wiil get results to show this
 
 
+6 # mgwmgw 2014-06-24 13:14
To use a health analogy, while I agree with the diagnosis, it would be far more useful to discuss the treatment.

To use another analogy, given the situation we have, what is the route from where we are to where we want to be, starting with the first step and not the destination?

We all know that the reason for American government wanting to solve almost all problems with the rest of the world by making war is that making war is very profitable for certain well connected people. That is hard to stop.

We all know that in a plutocracy, rule by the rich, those in power will mostly resist change that takes them out of power.

So, yes, America has a "log in our own eye". So what should we do first about that?
 
 
+7 # geraldom 2014-06-24 13:39
Once upon a time during the Vietnam war, there was a John Kerry who made a great altruistic speech in front of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in April of 1971 against the war in Vietnam in which he, unlike George W. Bush, personally served. Reference the following URL:

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/913184/posts

The following is a video from Democracy Now from 2004 in which you can hear Kerry's speech:

http://www.democracynow.org/2004/2/20/john_kerry_then_hear_kerrys_historic

I would begin at the 6 min mark in the video where Amy Goodman introduces an excerpt from the Winter Soldier hearings and then it goes into Kerry's speech at about the 10 min 15 sec mark.

What happened to that John Kerry? The John Kerry of today who is more than willing to send in U.S. forces into extremely dangerous combat zones of illegal wars of aggression by the United States and who also appears not to care very much about how many indigenous people will have to die in the bargain, is not the John Kerry of 1971.

The John Kerry of today is more like Colin Powell under the Bush administration where General Powell knowingly lied thru his teeth to justify the illegal invasion of Iraq for control of its energy resources.

The irony of what's happening is that it was the illegal invasion of Iraq in 2003 which has led up to today's situation in Iraq. The very criminal is being asked back into Iraq in order to help the puppet leader it put into office.
 
 
+4 # dsepeczi 2014-06-24 14:14
Quoting geraldom:


The irony of what's happening is that it was the illegal invasion of Iraq in 2003 which has led up to today's situation in Iraq. The very criminal is being asked back into Iraq in order to help the puppet leader it put into office.


... watch for more of the same once things settle down in Ukraine and its people are subjected to the US/EU/IMF brand of help, called "austerity".
 
 
-2 # geraldom 2014-06-24 16:43
dsepeczi, I wish you hadn't brought up Ukraine. That is one hell of a sore point with me. I'm trying to figure out what in hell Putin is doing.

As things are getting worse in eastern Ukraine each and everyday and more and more innocent people are dying, including children, from attacks by the Ukraine military, Putin has not only thrown the people of eastern Ukraine underneath the bus, he has given the Ukraine government the green light to do whatever it wants to do to crush the separatist movement in the east:

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2014-06-24/putin-asks-lawmakers-to-rescind-right-to-use-force-in-ukraine

http://news.yahoo.com/russias-putin-asks-upper-house-revoke-military-intervention-101449438.html

He's attempting to go as far out of his way to prove to the west that he's given them the freedom to do whatever they want in eastern Ukraine and Russia will do nothing to stop them

He could've stop this a long time ago with very little if any bloodshed via the use of the Russian military by moving into eastern Ukraine, and he would've been welcomed by its people.

He has acted extremely weak against the United States in Ukraine and will probably, in the end, lose all of Ukraine to the western powers including NATO. But, that is his choice. He's doing everything to guarantee that it will happen.
 
 
0 # dsepeczi 2014-06-25 07:26
Quoting geraldom:
dsepeczi, I wish you hadn't brought up Ukraine. That is one hell of a sore point with me. I'm trying to figure out what in hell Putin is doing.

As things are getting worse in eastern Ukraine each and everyday and more and more innocent people are dying, including children, from attacks by the Ukraine military, Putin has not only thrown the people of eastern Ukraine underneath the bus, he has given the Ukraine government the green light to do whatever it wants to do to crush the separatist movement in the east:

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2014-06-24/putin-asks-lawmakers-to-rescind-right-to-use-force-in-ukraine

http://news.yahoo.com/russias-putin-asks-upper-house-revoke-military-intervention-101449438.html

He's attempting to go as far out of his way to prove to the west that he's given them the freedom to do whatever they want in eastern Ukraine and Russia will do nothing to stop them

He could've stop this a long time ago with very little if any bloodshed via the use of the Russian military by moving into eastern Ukraine, and he would've been welcomed by its people.

He has acted extremely weak against the United States in Ukraine and will probably, in the end, lose all of Ukraine to the western powers including NATO. But, that is his choice. He's doing everything to guarantee that it will happen.


I agree that what's going on in East Ukraine is horrific but what is Putin to do now ? Russia can't win a war against us.
 
 
-1 # geraldom 2014-06-25 08:10
dsepeczi, he can go in with the Russian military, even now. It won't be as bloodless as it would have been if he would have done this early on, but Russia has the same right to protect its own people and its national security as the United States claims it has under similar circumstance.

As far as a confrontation between the United States and Russia, it is my contention that the United States does not want to get into a hot war with Russia that will very well lead up to a nuclear conflict over eastern Ukraine.

At this point, as far as Russia is concerned, if Russia allows eastern Ukraine to fall to Kiev, which will be the equivalent of all of Ukraine coming under the complete control of the United States, Putin, in my opinion, will have signed the death knell of Russia because this will embolden the United States and its western puppet allies in Europe to further encroach eastward into Russian federation territory.

If you were to look at what is going on, what has been going on, this whole thing is ludicrous. This is all happening in Russia's own backyard and Ukraine is one of the last of the Warsaw pact nations, and if Russia lets it go, Putin will have allowed the United States and NATO to fully close off Russia's western border with Europe.

Putin is allowing the United States to constantly threaten him and Russia and doesn't seem to have the balls to tell the U.S. where to go stick it.
 
 
-1 # dsepeczi 2014-06-25 08:55
I agree with all you're saying but I think the unfortunate position that Putin faces is that he "doesn't have the balls" because he doesn't have the army and possibly isn't interested in draining his own country's economy the way we're far too willing to do.
 
 
-3 # geraldom 2014-06-25 18:29
Quoting dsepeczi:
I agree with all you're saying but I think the unfortunate position that Putin faces is that he "doesn't have the balls" because he doesn't have the army and possibly isn't interested in draining his own country's economy the way we're far too willing to do.


I don't understand what you mean when you say that Putin doesn't have the army, dsepeczi. Russia may not have the military that the U.S. has, but it does have a powerful military that can easily push the Ukrainian forces out of eastern Ukraine in order to create a protective shield around the eastern region of Ukraine.

If Russia were to establish a military shield around eastern Ukraine, all of this violence would stop, and all that the U.S. and the EU and the illegal Kiev government can do is jump up and down, scream and complain.

The U.S. may attempt to force more sanctions on Russia, but it is my belief that it will blow back right in its face, and if Russia backs off on protecting eastern Ukraine because of the sanctions, Russia has to know that the U.S. will then know that it will be able to control Russia's actions with sanctions anytime it wants, and that will be all she wrote for Russia as a great nation. Russia might as well then surrender to the U.S. as another vassal state.
 
 
0 # dsepeczi 2014-06-26 10:17
[quote name="geraldom
I don't understand what you mean when you say that Putin doesn't have the army, dsepeczi. Russia may not have the military that the U.S. has, but it does have a powerful military that can easily push the Ukrainian forces out of eastern Ukraine in order to create a protective shield around the eastern region of Ukraine.

If Russia were to establish a military shield around eastern Ukraine, all of this violence would stop, and all that the U.S. and the EU and the illegal Kiev government can do is jump up and down, scream and complain.



You may be right in all you say but, from Putin's perspective, he has to consider the cost of making such a move. No one doubts that Russia could knock out Ukraine's military in less than a week but you may be more sure that America won't take that as an invitation to get involved militarily than Putin is. I don't think the US has any business iterfering in the affairs of Ukraine but I could say the same for Iraq, Iran, Syria, Venezuela ... the list goes on and on .... and that hasn't stopped us from getting involved anyway.
 
 
0 # Caliban 2014-06-27 23:14
Interesting debate, but I believe Putin is just being statesmanlike here. Neither Russia nor the US wants a military conflict here. Frankly, the Ukraine just isn't important enough. Naving secured his naval facilities by re-taking the Crimea, I suspect that Putin, quite sensibly, has 90% of what he wanted and 100% of what he believed he needed.

It is now time for the Ukrainians to learn to live in peace together, for that is also the only road this debt-ridden nation has to a modicum of prosperity.
 
 
+1 # grandma lynn 2014-06-25 22:20
Hell no; we won't go.
 
 
+12 # jayjay 2014-06-24 16:48
I think that USA should now stand for Uncontrolled Surveillance of Americans
 
 
+4 # spercepolnes 2014-06-24 18:53
And the worst part is - you're exporting your trash democracy to other pathetic like minded western governments around the world - those that slavishly worship the pathetic excuses you have as a government. We don't want your lifestyle, thank you very much! We're too busy fighting to try to keep what we already fought for!
 
 
-1 # JustSayin 2014-06-27 14:52
Quoting spercepolnes:
And the worst part is - you're exporting your trash democracy to other pathetic like minded western governments around the world - those that slavishly worship the pathetic excuses you have as a government. We don't want your lifestyle, thank you very much! We're too busy fighting to try to keep what we already fought for!


Australia's "lifestyle" is not that different than the US lifestyle. But lifestyle is not the same as politics.

Western governments are in the Western Hemisphere, not around the world. And most are already some form of democracy.

I do agree that we should not be trying to FORCE democracy on other governments such as those in the Middle East. I think there are better ways to introduce democracy to countries that don't have it but, unfortunately, most countries where a majority of citizens would CHOOSE democracy are ruled by powerful men and groups that refuse to allow that choice. It's true that we have failed in some of our attempts to militarily aid those countries in establishing democratic governments, and failed to adequately support those new governments we have helped establish. Dare we stop trying to help and just sit here idly watching citizens in other countries suffer at the hands of dictators and despots? You and we have so many advantages while they are denied basic freedoms. We may not go about it the best way, and we're not always successful, but it's inconceivable that we would stop trying.
 
 
+3 # Unicorn144 2014-06-24 20:50
This entire article broke my heart ...I donated 15 dollars I really can't afford...but please; keep up the good work....
 
 
+4 # Katpet11 2014-06-25 07:39
I agree with this entire list. So what can we do about all of this. It seems that the politicians have become so blatant because they feel there is nothing we can do. They don't even try to hide there intentions anymore. We have a corrupt media spreading propaganda keeping everyone fighting with their diversionary tactics. You can't have productive conversations with people on FB because there are always the trolls that go in and just incite people to anger. I sometimes wonder if that is what there job is to monitor FB and just stir the pot. I honestly don't put anything past our "government" now. As an ER nurse I have had many occasion to speak with tourist from other countries about their healthcare systems. They all had social medicine and they all loved it. I asked them about the horror stories that we were told about and I was told that they were just that, stories. Just the people in power making us afraid of something else. They had not one complaint about there healthcare. A few of the countries had a few healthcare plan options that you could purchase that were next to nothing that none of the people I spoke to participated in. They also pointed out what a shame it was that here in America we practically work until we die just to try to keep medical coverage. We have been sold lock, stock and barrel and our children have been enslaved to a lifetime of debt with their college loans. I have never felt such shame for this country before.
 
 
+1 # MarioMackiewicz 2014-06-25 12:10
All this is so correct!
The only thing I noticed that the author “blames” the single political party for all this mess.
Except that pretty good stuff!
 
 
0 # dsepeczi 2014-06-26 07:48
Quoting MarioMackiewicz:
All this is so correct!
The only thing I noticed that the author “blames” the single political party for all this mess.
Except that pretty good stuff!


While I can agree that sometimes some of the authors and posters here don't do enough to call out the democrats for their share of the blame, there are also many critics of Obama on these forums too. To what reference in THIS article are you referring to ? I admit that I only glossed over this article a 2nd time before writing my response to you because, well, I already read the article once and don't feel like doing it again, word for word. But the only references I see pointing to Republicans regard them filibustering two VA initiatives that came before them, denying the extension of unemployment benefits and food stamps for those that need it, and their refusal to close tax loopholes for corporations. None of these statements are false. All you have to do is look at who voted against these measures and you'll see a big R behind the majority of congressional votes that killed the initiatives. Republicans haven't hidden behind these votes. They embraced them for reasons I'd disagree with. So what are you taking issue with ? Facts have no bias.
 
 
-1 # JustSayin 2014-06-27 14:29
Quoting MarioMackiewicz:
All this is so correct!
The only thing I noticed that the author “blames” the single political party for all this mess.
Except that pretty good stuff!


What say you about Republicans' proclamation that they would do whatever was necessary to assure that Obama fail in leading our country? And their subsequent attempts, with some success, to do so? I'm not saying Republicans are responsible for ALL our ills. Democrats need accept a fair share of the responsibility. But level-headed citizens must agree that Republicans have, of late, done as much if not more damage to our stature than Democrats.
 
 
-4 # MarioMackiewicz 2014-06-25 12:30
I keep on reading the commentary and one thing comes clear to me
ALL REPUBLICANS ARE EVIL, ALL CONSERVATVES ARE EVIL as well…
Conclusion:
The only smart and sensible people are socialists and liberals in general…

What a bunch of crap!
I am so sick of your compartmentaliz ing .
I thought that this site promotes good creative thinking, but all I see is the place for a bunch sobbing liberals.
What a shame!
 
 
0 # Caliban 2014-06-27 23:23
And at least one whining Right-Winger.
 
 
+1 # David Heizer 2014-06-26 18:10
Except this entire list has nothing to do with foreign policy.
 
 
0 # JustSayin 2014-06-27 14:22
Jon Stewart had an excellent commentary on last night's show (June 26) about many of these issues and especially Republican officials' refusal to fund necessary changes. Though not all the blame can be placed on Republicans!

You can access Stewart's piece on the Comedy Central site or through YouTube.
 

THE NEW STREAMLINED RSN LOGIN PROCESS: Register once, then login and you are ready to comment. All you need is a Username and a Password of your choosing and you are free to comment whenever you like! Welcome to the Reader Supported News community.

RSNRSN