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Noam Chomsky begins: "The US midterm elections register a level of anger, fear and disillusionment in the country like nothing I can recall in my lifetime. Since the Democrats are in power, they bear the brunt of the revulsion over our current socioeconomic and political situation."

Portrait, Noam Chomsky, 06/15/09. (photo: Sam Lahoz)
Portrait, Noam Chomsky, 06/15/09. (photo: Sam Lahoz)

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-5 # Mike Horner 2010-11-09 11:58
For friday discussion
 
 
+5 # Vicki 2010-11-09 16:36
what you are missing is the fact that 1) Rasmussen Polls have just been determined to be the MOST biased towards Repubs and why are you quoting the Financial Times? Really!@
 
 
-29 # Thomas Sawyer 2010-11-09 12:55
This article is right on. What the author does not address is that the fact that up until the late 1960's everyone in this country felt united in our similarity. We received our evening news from one or two sources; the newspapers were known as the Third Estate whose role was to monitor and criticize government for the protection of the citizens who did not follow the dad-to-day actions of government. During the depression this made accepting the situation bearable. Today we are anything but united in many ways. Johnsons's Great Society program resulted in 30 to 40% of our children being raised in single family homes; religious values have been removed from much of the population; the press now promotes government rather than guarding us from it; and the injection of Muslims into America has led to a definite feeling of disunity. The government is so removed from being responsible to the people that the Treasury Secretary can spent $2.0 TRILLION, refuse to say where it went, and nobody cares.
 
 
+4 # Huck Finn 2010-11-09 14:03
This comment has its analysis half right, but it's missing the crucial half, and so is Chomsky's analysis. Race. White Americans were united until the 60's behind equitable and just government policies that tried to provide economic security and opportunity for all. What destroyed this, and gave the financial lunacy of the right its success, was the extension of these policies to African Americans in the 60's. Then began the long withdrawal of white (especially male) support for the New Deal settlement and for government efforts to create a just and equal society. That explains why American workers have accepted the stagnation of real incomes for the last 30 years, and why they have blamed this on Federal government policies, high taxes, and their black fellow workers and citizens. Chomsky is always blind to this kind of historical analysis. Everything for him is a conspiracy against a just people. It's remarkably naive. In fact, the roots of the malaise are deep. We have to root up our racism is we're ever to build a just society for all of us. And as long as most white people fail to realize that, finance and big business will continue to control our politics and our lives.
 
 
-17 # John Henry 2010-11-09 14:21
Mr. Sawyer,
The article cannot be right on if the facts you noted are true. And they are true. Comsky notes,"During the presidential election, Barack Obama’s primary constituency was financial institutions, which have gained remarkable dominance over the economy in the past generation." and a few lines later notes, " Thomas Ferguson’s “investment theory of politics,” which sees elections as occasions when groups of investors coalesce in order to control the state by selecting the architects of policies who will serve their interests."

This adds up. He fails, however, to note the Cloward-Piven strategy embraced by all of Obama's inner circle. He also fails to note that the anthropogenic global warming advocates have been discredited and that the Chicago Climate Exchange is folding up its operations. All of this looks to me like Chomsky is backing up to look for a new approach to his goal of globalization. This piece offers observations that seem correct and, for him, mild. That is a far cry from Noam Chomsky's usual heavy handed support of the dialectic of materialism but it keeps up his unfounded warning of the rise of a renewed NAZI threat from the right.
 
 
+11 # mark 2010-11-09 22:21
the anthropogenic g. warming advocates have been discredited? by whom? and how broadly accepted is this outside your rasmussen polled circle?
 
 
-8 # John Henry 2010-11-11 08:40
By their own falsification of some data and casting out other data and by their specious mathematical modeling.
 
 
-17 # John Henry 2010-11-09 14:31
Mr. Sawyer (part 2) I know how most readers of this site hold as an article of faith that national socialism is a right wing travesty. However, that form of socialism is an outgrowth of the dominant Western European vision of socialism established in England by the Fabian society. Chomsky still accuses everyone on the side of political conservativism of being national socialists. Take warning from that purposeful distortion.
You are right on about the disaster of multicultural goals imposed by government policy beginning under Johnson. Isalam in particular is a belief system that was crafted for warriors and cannot co-exist with a belief system centered on natural law and the corollary natural rights of man. The evidences you cited indicate a governing group dedicated to destruction of our nation. The character of comments this response to your fine statement will likely attract illustrate the degree to which cultural fragmentation has already taken place. Economic fragmentation is being engineered while we breathe.
 
 
+3 # Bob Griffin 2010-11-09 16:48
It appears that Nazism was actually more closely related to Boulangism, an anti-liberal movement.
 
 
+10 # d julien 2010-11-09 23:02
Mr. Henry, I am curious about your characterizatio n of (I assume ) western civ. You say proudly, it is centered on natural law and the corollary natural rights of man. That is half correct. It is natural lawlessness when it comes to how the dominant white power structure treats minority populations. And the natural rights of man are given only to some men who happen to be the right color and backround and sexual orientation. I needn't remind you that Islam had nothing to do with the Nazis. The evoved and superior western civilization produced Hitler and his line of thinking. Don't go scapegoating Muslims or anyone else....
 
 
+4 # Mark 2010-11-10 11:51
Hitler did try to make a deal with some Arab Countries to help him with the "Jewish solution"...Rea d "The Third Reich in Power", the second part of a trilogy by Evans......
 
 
+3 # Geoffrey Abrams 2010-11-12 21:24
And what would you call the reach out from Palestine by Avram Stern of Stern Gang fame to make an alliance with the Nazis through contacts in Vichy Syria during the early years of the war when the Nazis were on the road to victory?
 
 
+1 # Daniel Fletcher 2010-11-10 02:01
Amazingly John, you can be so substantially insightful in some areas...and so warped in others. While I substantially disagree with virtually all of your conclusions I appreciate your thoughtfulness. Out of curiosity, when you use the term "national socialism" do you mean "nationalism" per se? Do you distinguish between economic socialism and "national socialism" ala nationalism?
 
 
+3 # genierae 2010-11-10 07:36
John Henry, even George Bush admits that Islam is a peaceful religion that has been co-opted by a relatively small number of extremists. The word jihad pertains to an inner struggle, not an outer one. You need to read up on Sufism; sufis are the mystics of Islam, and they express it in its purest form. The vast majority of Muslims in this country are peaceful Americans who are no threat to anyone.
 
 
+3 # kramer 2010-11-12 10:33
Sawyer says that in the '60s, we "received our evening news from one or two sources." Is this a good thing?

I ask this because we have a healthy diversity of news sources. And I thought diversity was good?
 
 
+1 # Daniel Fletcher 2010-11-12 14:14
Quoting kramer:
Sawyer says that in the '60s, we "received our evening news from one or two sources." Is this a good thing?

I ask this because we have a healthy diversity of news sources. And I thought diversity was good?


I get your point, but the healthy diversity of news sources you mention exists ONLY if, as you peruse news sources, you do so inclusive of foreign journalism at least, if not more, as rigorously as you would American media. In the US we distinctly DO NOT have a healthy diversity of news sources. Not at all. It is monolithic in it's corporate bias and its apparent utter refusal to even begin to practice traditional investigative journalistic practice. By definition, good journalism "questions the prevailing wisdom" if only to hold accountable those who are projecting what is "supposed" to be the official version of reality...to test that version out.
Maybe my criticism is only applicable to mainstream media, but that's the only media most people consult, and it is pathetic.
 
 
+2 # kramer 2010-11-12 10:36
"the corresponding hollowing-out of domestic production."

translation: The offshoring of jobs from America.

Why?

Start with the World Bank and their many economic infrastructure development projects all over the world.
 
 
-1 # Daniel Fletcher 2010-11-12 14:17
Quoting kramer:
"the corresponding hollowing-out of domestic production."

translation: The offshoring of jobs from America.

Why?

Start with the World Bank and their many economic infrastructure development projects all over the world.


Please explain what this has to do, if anything, with manufacturing jobs being outsourced overseas. Is it necessarily the case that developing foreign infrastructure necessitates the removal of manufacturing from the U.S.? If so, why?
 
 
+13 # John Sharpe 2010-11-09 13:03
Another depressing assessment. But, there's nothing here that we didn't know already--especi ally if one had been looking--and dare I add "thinking"?
 
 
+35 # rm 2010-11-09 13:10
Chomsky misses the point. There was far more anger in 2003 and 2004 when Bush invaded Iraq and then stole the election from Kerry. The anger and frustration were at levels higher than any time since the Vietnam and Civil Rights movements of the 60s and 70s.

Sure some of the Teabagger complaints are real but most people in the movment don't understand the nature of the complaints they make. They do not know that their wages have gone down for 30 years. All they see is too many regulations on business. They want the minimun wage repealed and unions outlawed. If that were to happen thier wages would go down to Mexico's level. The Teabag movement was engineered from the top by esp. people like Limbaugh, Hannity, Beck, and Levine. The Teabag movement has as it hero Sarah Palin who is a creature of the neo-cons. She's anything but a "maverick." The Teabaggers are useful idiots.

The corporate elite who own and run the US are simply milking it dry. They will loot all the wealth in the US because that is what they exist to do. Then they will move on. There's no stopping it. Get used to it.
 
 
+25 # ECON 2010-11-09 13:27
Noam Chomsky excellent article!! Wake up America. You are of banana republic status with the 1 percent owning government through the corporate state edifice of big business.
 
 
+19 # lariokie 2010-11-09 13:34
Noam Chomsky is prophet as well as a distinguished historian. I must say, I am not as sure that history does not repeat itself, regardless of the complexity of our present. One can easily project the Tea Partiers and the militias as Brownshirts, and the right wing leaders as the intelligencia of a Fourth Reich on steroids. Imagine the control such a movement could weild with today's technology? The internet alone is like a "bug" in every American's household.

When our democracy devolves into irrational name-calling and even violence, as it has in the past decade, one need not stretch one's imagination too far to see the parallels with fascism.
 
 
-9 # rock 2010-11-10 00:05
Noam Chomsky may be a distinguished linguistician, but to characterize him as a distinguished historian or a "prophet" is a huge stretch. But then his admirers are distinguished at stretching things.

It is actually far easier to project the SEIU and the New Black Panthers as Brownshirts, and Saul Alinsky and Bill Ayers as the intelligencia of the next Reich.

Let's have a rational discussion about who is doing the irrational name-calling and how to get it toned down.
 
 
+7 # Daniel Fletcher 2010-11-10 09:37
rock, you are establishing your credentials as not knowing as much as you think you do. Note that I'm avoiding name calling here. Your apparent knowledge of Chomsky is remarkable as you mischaracterize his significance completely. He is indeed a disinguished historian and has been remarkably prophetic for years. He has been a remarkably productive intellectual and is cited globaly for his meritorious insight and the development of his ideas. While quite controversial he is a formidable opponent to the right based, if nothing else, on his gifts as an intellect and an acamedician.
As for your second sentance, the absurdity of your observation hardly merits comment.
Yes, a rational discussion about who is doing the irrational name calling and how to get it toned down is valid, but do you appreciate how difficult it is to discuss rationally with people who are using irrational rhetoric? I think many of your views are absurd, which is not name calling but opinion stating, and I think that posts such as your last one are ill informed. Can I say this without you calling me irrational? Or is your conception of "rational" limited to ideas that agree with yours only?
 
 
+20 # Observer 47 2010-11-09 13:39
You are right, Mr. Chomsky, insofar as your reasoning goes. It's disingenous, however, to absolve the banksters and grasping CEOs from blame by saying that their actions are the result of the institutions they inhabit. You've made a false separation between behavior and consequences in that case, and relegated their crimes to a vacuum that doesn't exist in the real world. Also, in regard to the Tea Baggers, you neglect to mention or take into account that the movement is the child of the very corporate oligarchy that the Baggers are protesting. In other words, they're being manipulated by the very forces they say they despise, whipped into a frenzy of hatred against targets trumped up by the men behind the curtain, so as to keep disguised the real villains.
 
 
+12 # Don soeken 2010-11-09 15:32
This is a great comment and I agree with process that is unfolding in the present so-called Tea Party. One of the groups behind this corporate funded movement are the Koch brothers. They are using these uninformed people to increase their profits and the rest of us suffer the consequenses.
 
 
+6 # d julien 2010-11-09 23:07
I think what Chomsky is saying is that corporate decisions are based on short term economic gain for the CEO's and the stockholders. This is by definition. It is apparently legal. And as I recal defenders of capitalism saying- Greed is good. Everyone looks out for his or her own interest and society will benefit. I think the fallicy of this argument is obvious but that is what good capitalists are taught.
 
 
0 # Daniel Fletcher 2010-11-10 02:06
Quoting Observer 47:
You are right, Mr. Chomsky, insofar as your reasoning goes. It's disingenous, however, to absolve the banksters and grasping CEOs from blame by saying that their actions are the result of the institutions they inhabit. You've made a false separation between behavior and consequences in that case, and relegated their crimes to a vacuum that doesn't exist in the real world. Also, in regard to the Tea Baggers, you neglect to mention or take into account that the movement is the child of the very corporate oligarchy that the Baggers are protesting. In other words, they're being manipulated by the very forces they say they despise, whipped into a frenzy of hatred against targets trumped up by the men behind the curtain, so as to keep disguised the real villains.

Are you paying attention John Henry? You're an extremely intelligent person...and a teabagger. I wish you'd explain yourself. Observer 47 defines the group yo identify yourself with quite well. Explain yourself.
 
 
+1 # Kitchen_Philosopher 2010-11-13 15:03
Quoting Observer 47:
Also, in regard to the Tea Baggers, you neglect to mention or take into account that the movement is the child of the very corporate oligarchy that the Baggers are protesting. In other words, they're being manipulated by the very forces they say they despise, whipped into a frenzy of hatred against targets trumped up by the men behind the curtain, so as to keep disguised the real villains.


With snappy sound bites instead of real news, the Tea Party "ordinary folks" have drunk the Kool-Aid.
 
 
+2 # Gene 2010-11-09 13:39
Interesting reading
 
 
0 # Rachel leslie 2010-11-09 13:45
Excellent description of. Current situation. In U
.S.
 
 
-24 # Gus St. Anthony 2010-11-09 14:02
Of course global warming is real. There have been global warmings and coolings throughout the history of the planet. Think "ice ages". They are primarily due to solar flare activity and the cyclic relationship of the magnetic pole to the sun. Carbon emissions and the greenhouse effect play a very small part in this phenomena.
 
 
+4 # Activista 2010-11-09 16:01
Quoting Gus St. Anthony:
Carbon emissions and the greenhouse effect play a very small part in this phenomena.


man made gases are the main contributor to present global warming -
NASA - Global Warming - global warming could have many damaging effects. It might harm plants and animals that live in the sea. It could also force animals and plants on ...
climate.nasa.gov
 
 
+7 # Bob Griffin 2010-11-09 16:53
While there have been intense global warmings and coolings in the past, we don't have the appropriate solar activity or relationship for heliogenic global warming, and human activity has a definite effect on environment...
 
 
+10 # Bob Griffin 2010-11-09 16:56
Current solar activity and the current relationship of the magnetic pole to the sun do not explain current global warming.
 
 
+7 # Glen 2010-11-10 07:34
No warming or cooling periods have ever happened as rapidly as now. Alaska permafrost gone, huge sections of Antarctica breaking off, islands being overwhelmed, many once vibrant lands drying up, lakes drying up, etc. Certainly there have been rapid die-offs of animals, but not warming and cooling. Historical warming and cooling took place without there being billions of people on the planet cutting billions of trees, driving billions of cars, flying planes, building polluting factories, using up water, covering the land with cement and asphalt and spreading cities.

Nothing in the past compares to now because human beings were not here in such great numbers.
 
 
+9 # Juan 2010-11-09 14:12
Sadly, this article is right on the money. Not one major outlet will ever publish it. They seek the same outcome as many on the right and simply hide behind the false claim of news to seem other than.
 
 
+2 # Geo F 2010-11-09 14:26
Chomsky is correct in most points. However, Adam Smith was a more fundamental critic of industrializing societies that were emerging from the formal power of monarchy and serfdom. Ferguson seems to be spelling out the details.

The power now moving into view is the same as that which has been in charge since Cro-Magnon first dominated the Neanderthals. The puzzling thing to me is the relative indifference of so many millions of people for my entire lifetime (65 years) suddenly becoming so alert and angry.

So Chomsky is right but so what? The desire to march over the cliff is inborn. The pin in the grenade is the legal requirement that corporations return a profit to their stockholders. Absent that, we descend into the really dark places of the human soul.
 
 
+5 # Thomas Sawyer 2010-11-09 14:32
The Fourth Reich? What is never addressed is why the German people accepted the Jews as the cause for their situation. During the depression many Germans lost everything to the bankers and lawyers, and the the bankers were all Jewish. As the NYC banks in this country actually control more and more industry, they must stop and ask are they going too far?
 
 
+4 # Bob Griffin 2010-11-09 16:58
proto-Nazi German anti-Semitism preceded the Depression. It first starts becoming obvious during the Weimar Republic, though its roots are in and before the 19th century.
 
 
+2 # Betty Harris 2010-11-09 14:38
The tea party was engineered by the Koch brothers but Chomsky doesn't even mention them, laying it instead to the nutjobs with verbal diarhera on Fox. The majority of the people who are part of this "movement" are old white people, who don't work and are living off social security, get their medical care from another government program and have had a decent life and will not live long enough to feel the effects of what their actions have helped to bring about. Once more, I am not impressed with Norm.
 
 
+5 # Glen 2010-11-10 07:07
Betty, you sound very condescending when you bring up the "old white people, who don't work and are living off social security, get their medical care from another government program and have had a decent life and will not live long enough to feel the effects of what their actions have helped to bring about."

You don't really have that knowledge about them. It could be they have suffered a great deal due to the government and economy and worked hard all their lives, paying into social security and medicare. The "government programs" you appear to be making fun of are there for all of us and were established due to the suffering of citizens. Many younger people in the U.S. were not around to see conditions of workers, the young, older folks, various races, well, many many citizens.

It is these very programs we should be fighting for and should be criticizing government military spending. Certainly groups such as the Tea Party can be and are misdirected. Let's criticize and encourage change in those groups for the right reasons, not because they are "old white people".
 
 
+4 # Peacedragon 2010-11-09 14:38
Is it possible that capitalism has gotten to the point that it must be replaced? But by what? We are treading dangeerous grouned either way.
 
 
+2 # genierae 2010-11-10 07:50
It doesn't need replaced, it just needs to be restrained. Put the common good first, with capitalism supporting it, and our "democracy" would be transformed into a real one.
 
 
+5 # Activista 2010-11-09 15:54
Chomsky: "half the “mainstream Americans” in a Rasmussen poll last month said they view the Tea Party movement favorably—a reflection of the spirit of disenchantment"
Rasmussen poll is a Republican poll associated with FOX - the same Rasmussen poll that predicted win of Republicans in California and put hundreds of millions into the conservative media - winning Karl Rove scheme.
www.pollingreport.com/politics.htm
indicates that TP is a fart ...
 
 
+3 # Clinton Cox 2010-11-09 16:44
Noam explains a lot, as usual.
 
 
+4 # carol bohn 2010-11-09 17:01
so who amongst you/us will 'present an alternative' ...'will organize to help the countless disaffected and lead the way to a better future."????
 
 
-2 # Daniel Fletcher 2010-11-10 02:14
Quoting carol bohn:
so who amongst you/us will 'present an alternative' ...'will organize to help the countless disaffected and lead the way to a better future."????

You might be surprised to learn that many older citizens are returning to university life to prepare for active roles in presenting alternatives and organizing the countless disaffected and leading the way to a better future. Not everyone has given up. There's quite a number of us but the concern is simply that our controlled media will deny our voice and getting a public platform will be difficult. Rest assured though that there are theorists and activists in the making right now. The important question is: When the time comes, will you stand up or stand by when the movement(s) begin?
 
 
+4 # robert whitney 2010-11-09 18:52
in regard to transparency in campaign donations, while i agree this would help, it misses the real point.

we must take ALL money out of the federal election process. We need a constitutional amendment that would mandate taxpayer funded elections and ban ALL campaign contributions from any other source. This would solve much of what is wrong with America both politically and economically.

There is little time lefty and half-measures never work to solve large problems.
 
 
+2 # Leigh 2010-11-10 21:23
Robert, you are absolutely correct about mandating total public funding of election campaigns. But that still leaves the problem of outside organizations saturating the corporate media with lies and ugly propaganda, the lobbying industry, and the revolving door of employment between big business and government. There is far more to do to rid the government of its corporate masters, but it MUST be done or our democracy may never recover.
 
 
+2 # Leigh 2010-11-10 23:12
Robert, you are absolutely correct about the need to mandate total public funding of election campaigns. But we would still have the problem of well funded outside "non-profit" organizations saturating the corporate media with lies and ugly propaganda, as well as the very lucrative lobbying industry and the revolving door of employment between big business and government. Herculean tasks, yes, but unless we rid the government of its corporate masters our democracy may not survive.
 
 
+2 # Ann Garrison 2010-11-09 19:45
So again, of course, the question: why did Chomsky, as always, urge us to vote for Obama and the Dems, unless we lived in a state so blue that our votes wouldn't count.
 
 
+3 # Ilya Shambat 2010-11-10 03:33
Here's one alternative that's both rational and cohesive:

http://sites.google.com/site/ilyashambatwritings/integrative
 
 
+2 # EGH 2010-11-10 06:17
Overlooked is the influence of the media. Cable TV and the internet have exponentially increased the outlets for opinion shapers and influence peddlers. Unfortunately, however, time honored virtues such as truth, honesty and integrity are now resting in peace. When combined with the fact that there is no consequence for misrepresentati on of facts and outright untruthfulness, politicians feel free to use this circumstance to influence the increasingly gullible populace even against their best interest. In times of economic crisis, persons are even more susceptible to this type of manipulation.
Sound economic theory, and 'for the common good' principles practices have given way to divisiveness which is exploited for short term political gain.
I suggest that we have now entered a period characterized by 'immoral suasion' that disregards consequences to the well-being of the economy and the common good of the populace where political power is the supreme ultimate prize.
We must find a way to make this type of political dishonesty have consequences in the short-term. Awaiting the ballot is no longer adequate to combat the overwhelming broadcast of 'IMMORAL SUASION'
 
 
+1 # Daniel Fletcher 2010-11-10 09:45
Pretty good EGH! I agree. There seems to be no consequence for deception, out right lying and grossly distorted misrepresentati ons from all quarters it seems. I'm inclined to add to your view that we are living in an age that could also be cited for the death of intellectual integrity. It isn't that we're in an anti-intellectu al age so much as an age of broadly orchestrated lies...a dumbing down rapidly accelerating because honesty in expression is simply no longer valued.
I sure do miss the days when we actually had journalism instead of infotainment and propoganda. I have always respected traditional journalism, which no longer exists, for its simple mission of questioning the prevailing wisdom if for no other reason than to force the prevailing conception of thngs to be held accountable to honest inquiry and truth.
 
 
+1 # wfalco 2010-11-10 09:09
Chomsky writes, " ridiculing Tea Party shenanigans is a serious error...ask ourselves why justly angry people are being mobilized by the extreme right."
I disagree with the premise they are "justly angry". I would argue that the so called Tea Party people have always been angry. They were never this oprganized in the past but they are not a new phenomena. They are the same angry whites who hate unions,liberals ,and any government program that could remotely be labled as "socialist." They are not great critical thinkers and are easily mislead-today they have a perfect storm of propaganda that fits their needs-right wing radio blow hards and Fox News. The anger Chomsky claims has always been there. Hatred of "others" is still a strong focus as scapegoting serves their psychlogical needs.
 
 
+4 # Glen 2010-11-10 12:00
Yes, wfalco, the anger has always been there, in both young and old, but it is a mistake to assume what drives that anger in each member of the Tea Party or those who are out there as independents, following nothing like the Tea Party.

I see anger every day on the job, in hospitals, in sports, and elsewhere. Those activities are immediate and therefore easy targets for the anger. It appears to me the Tea Party has provided an outlet, no matter how misguided, but not all the anger was originally directed at the government or things related.

Don't forget, many older Tea Partiers were active during the sixties. Yes, many are still around, both conservative and liberal. Many of them saw this day coming but continue to be confused about where to go with protests and demonstrations. They have learned the hard way how dangerous it can be. The Tea Party is in comfortable circumstances, but has no clue who is directing them or where they will go with it.
 
 
0 # Daniel Fletcher 2010-11-11 22:18
Precisely wfalco! Nicely put!
 
 
+3 # tanis Fletcher 2010-11-10 10:44
I am not so elequent as the previous commentors but it is obvious to me that what we are seeing grow out of our chemical compost is the energy of Pluto, no longer a planet I hear, but the influence must be called the age of the plutocrat. Do we understand what that means? These are people in power who use a corporation until they don't need it any longer and then they dissolve it. Imagine what their view of the population is. They pay their way (tea party) then dissolve the people. Easy to do, simply feed them lousy food and create massive unemployment, yet unknown. Who are they? Take a guess and watch them thrive in this environment.
 
 
+2 # Seymour Brodsky 2010-11-10 11:05
Very interesting.... ..
 
 
+3 # Austin Loomis 2010-11-10 15:05
"It is far more appropriate to understand what lies behind the movement’s popular appeal, and to ask ourselves why justly angry people are being mobilized by the extreme right and not by the kind of constructive activism that rose during the Depression, like the CIO (Congress of Industrial Organizations)."

Because the unions who organized that activism have been largely equated, in the public mind, with "Communism, Khadafy, sin and hemorrhoids" (to quote an only slightly exaggerated "Bloom County" Sunday strip).
 
 
+3 # Kol 2010-11-10 18:16
"There is nothing worse than aggressive stupidity."
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
German dramatist, novelist, poet, & scientist (1749 - 1832)
 
 
+5 # Dave 2010-11-10 19:00
Good thinking, but what about 3rd parties? I refuse to vote because of my distaste and distrust of both parties mentioned. When ballot access is no longer a problem, I will return as a voter. But now before.
 
 
+2 # Glen 2010-11-11 12:49
I agree, Dave. The frustration of constantly being cast as either left or right, democrat or republican, middle left, middle right, or any of the other dual type labels is stifling the desire to participate in many of us. I, too, am no longer voting and have no confidence in any aspect of our system, much less those put up to "run" for president.
 
 
+5 # Hollis 2010-11-11 10:58
I would submit that the demise of all that is good started with the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 that began the destruction of the union movement in this country in the guise of fighting "communism". From that moment on the right understood that they could defeat progressive changes in this country over a period of time. Once the ascendant labor movement was stifled then the only long term, self supporting organized force for change was hamstrung.
 
 
+3 # Anne Baldwin 2010-11-12 07:14
"Since the Democrats are in power . . . ."

Wrong. The Democrats aren't in power. The Kleptocrats are, and have been since Carter lost to Reagan.

Wake up and smell the corruption.
 
 
+1 # Attila 2010-11-14 06:43
Chomsky has his own bias: Conspiracy theories. Everyone posting here and Chomsky himself have SOME part of the truth of the matter. However, NOONE seems to have any answers.
 

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