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Excerpt: "The documents - many marked secret - form part of the military's internal investigation, and confirm much of what happened at Haditha, a Euphrates River town where Marines killed 24 Iraqis, including a 76-year-old man in a wheelchair, women and children, some just toddlers."

Transcripts of military interviews from the investigation into the Haditha massacre were found at this trailer in a junkyard in Baghdad, which specializes in selling trailers and office supplies left over from American military base closings. (photo: Andrea Bruce/The New York Times)
Transcripts of military interviews from the investigation into the Haditha massacre were found at this trailer in a junkyard in Baghdad, which specializes in selling trailers and office supplies left over from American military base closings. (photo: Andrea Bruce/The New York Times)



Documents Reveal US Massacre in Haditha, Iraq

By Michael S. Schmidt, The New York Times

15 December 11

 

arines sat down, swore to tell the truth and began to give secret interviews discussing one of the most horrific episodes of America's time in Iraq: the 2005 massacre by Marines of Iraqi civilians in the town of Haditha.

"I mean, whether it's a result of our action or other action, you know, discovering 20 bodies, throats slit, 20 bodies, you know, beheaded, 20 bodies here, 20 bodies there," Col. Thomas Cariker, a commander in Anbar Province at the time, told investigators as he described the chaos of Iraq. At times, he said, deaths were caused by "grenade attacks on a checkpoint and, you know, collateral with civilians."

The 400 pages of interrogations, once closely guarded as secrets of war, were supposed to have been destroyed as the last American troops prepare to leave Iraq. Instead, they were discovered along with reams of other classified documents, including military maps showing helicopter routes and radar capabilities, by a reporter for The New York Times at a junkyard outside Baghdad. An attendant was burning them as fuel to cook a dinner of smoked carp.

The documents - many marked secret - form part of the military's internal investigation, and confirm much of what happened at Haditha, a Euphrates River town where Marines killed 24 Iraqis, including a 76-year-old man in a wheelchair, women and children, some just toddlers.

Haditha became a defining moment of the war, helping cement an enduring Iraqi distrust of the United States and a resentment that not one Marine has been convicted.

But the accounts are just as striking for what they reveal about the extraordinary strains on the soldiers who were assigned here, their frustrations and their frequently painful encounters with a population they did not understand. In their own words, the report documents the dehumanizing nature of this war, where Marines came to view 20 dead civilians as not "remarkable," but as routine.

Iraqi civilians were being killed all the time. Maj. Gen. Steve Johnson, the commander of American forces in Anbar, in his own testimony, described it as "a cost of doing business."

The stress of combat left some soldiers paralyzed, the testimony shows. Troops, traumatized by the rising violence and feeling constantly under siege, grew increasingly twitchy, killing more and more civilians in accidental encounters. Others became so desensitized and inured to the killing that they fired on Iraqi civilians deliberately while their fellow soldiers snapped pictures, and were court-martialed. The bodies piled up at a time when the war had gone horribly wrong.

Charges were dropped against six of the accused Marines in the Haditha episode, one was acquitted and the last remaining case against one Marine is scheduled to go to trial next year.

That sense of American impunity ultimately poisoned any chance for American forces to remain in Iraq, because the Iraqis would not let them stay without being subject to Iraqi laws and courts, a condition the White House could not accept.

Told about the documents that had been found, Col. Barry Johnson, a spokesman for the United States military in Iraq, said that many of the documents remained classified and should have been destroyed. "Despite the way in which they were improperly discarded and came into your possession, we are not at liberty to discuss classified information," he said.

He added: "We take any breach of classified information as an extremely serious matter. In this case, the documents are being reviewed to determine whether an investigation is warranted." The military said it did not know from which investigation the documents had come, but the papers appear to be from an inquiry by Maj. Gen. Eldon Bargewell into the events in Haditha. The documents ultimately led to a report that concluded that the Marine Corps's chain of command engaged in "willful negligence" in failing to investigate the episode and that Marine commanders were far too willing to tolerate civilian casualties. That report, however, did not include the transcripts.

Under Pressure

Many of those testifying at bases in Iraq or the United States were clearly under scrutiny for not investigating an atrocity and may have tried to shape their statements to dispel any notion that they had sought to cover up the events. But the accounts also show the consternation of the Marines as they struggled to control an unfamiliar land and its people in what amounted to a constant state of siege from fighters who were nearly indistinguishable from noncombatants.

Some, feeling they were under attack constantly, decided to use force first and ask questions later. If Marines took fire from a building, they would often level it. Drivers who approached checkpoints without stopping were assumed to be suicide bombers.

"When a car doesn't stop, it crosses the trigger line, Marines engage and, yes, sir, there are people inside the car that are killed that have nothing to do with it," Sgt. Maj. Edward T. Sax, the battalion's senior noncommissioned officer, testified.

He added, "I had Marines shoot children in cars and deal with the Marines individually one on one about it because they have a hard time dealing with that."

Sergeant Major Sax said he would ask the Marines responsible if they had known there had been children in the car. When they said no, he said he would tell them they were not at fault. He said he felt for the Marines who had fired the shots, saying they would carry a lifelong burden.

"It is one thing to kill an insurgent in a head-on fight," Sergeant Major Sax testified. "It is a whole different thing - and I hate to say it, the way we are raised in America - to injure a female or injure a child or in the worse case, kill a female or kill a child."

They could not understand why so many Iraqis just did not stop at checkpoints and speculated that it was because of illiteracy or poor eyesight.

"They don't have glasses and stuff," Col. John Ledoux said. "It really makes you wonder because some of the things that they would do just to keep coming. You know, it's hard to imagine they would just keep coming, but sometimes they do."

Such was the environment in 2005, when the Marines from Company K of the Third Battalion, First Marine Regiment from Camp Pendleton, Calif., arrived in Anbar Province, where Haditha is located, many for their second or third tours in Iraq.

The province had become a stronghold for disenfranchised Sunnis and foreign fighters who wanted to expel the United States from Iraq, or just kill as many Americans as possible. Of the 4,483 American deaths in Iraq, 1,335 happened in Anbar.

In 2004, four Blackwater contractors were gunned down and dragged through the streets of Falluja, their bodies burned and hung on a bridge over the Euphrates. Days later, the United States military moved into the city, and chaos ensued in Anbar Province for the next two years as the Americans tried to fight off the insurgents.

The stress of combat soon bore down. A legal adviser to the Marine unit stopped taking his medication for obsessive-compulsive disorder and stopped functioning.

"We had the one where Marines had photographed themselves taking shots at people," Col. R. Kelly testified, saying that they immediately called the Naval Criminal Investigative Service and "confiscated their little camera." He said the soldiers involved received a court-martial.

All of this set the stage for what happened in Haditha on Nov. 19, 2005.

A Tragedy Ensues

That morning, a military convoy of four vehicles was heading to an outpost in Haditha when one of the vehicles was hit by a roadside bomb.

Several Marines got out to attend to the wounded, including one who eventually died, while others looked for insurgents who might have set off the bomb. Within a few hours 24 Iraqis - including a 76-year-old man and children between the ages of 3 and 15 - were killed, many inside their homes.

Townspeople contended that the Marines overreacted to the attack and shot civilians, only one of whom was armed. The Marines said they thought they were under attack.

When the initial reports arrived saying more than 20 civilians had been killed in Haditha, the Marines receiving them said they were not surprised by the high civilian death toll.

Chief Warrant Officer K. R. Norwood, who received reports from the field on the day of the killings and briefed commanders on them, testified that 20 dead civilians was not unusual.

"I meant, it wasn't remarkable, based off of the area I wouldn't say remarkable, sir," Mr. Norwood said. "And that is just my definition. Not that I think one life is not remarkable, it's just -"

An investigator asked the officer: "I mean remarkable or noteworthy in terms of something that would have caught your attention where you would have immediately said, "Got to have more information on that. That is a lot of casualties.' "

"Not at the time, sir," the officer testified.

General Johnson, the commander of American forces in Anbar Province, said he did not feel compelled to go back and examine the events because they were part of a continuing pattern of civilian deaths.

"It happened all the time, not necessarily in MNF-West all the time, but throughout the whole country," General Johnson testified, using a military abbreviation for allied forces in western Iraq.

"So, you know, maybe - I guess maybe if I was sitting here at Quantico and heard that 15 civilians were killed I would have been surprised and shocked and gone - done more to look into it," he testified, referring to Marine Corps Base Quantico in Virginia. "But at that point in time, I felt that was - had been, for whatever reason, part of that engagement and felt that it was just a cost of doing business on that particular engagement."

When Marines arrived on the scene to assess the number of dead bodies, at least one Marine thought it would be a good time to take pictures for his own keeping.

"I know I had one Marine who was taking pictures just to take pictures and I told him to delete all those pictures," testified a first lieutenant identified as M. D. Frank.

The documents uncovered by The Times - which include handwritten notes from soldiers, waivers by Marines of their right against self-incrimination, diagrams of where dead women and children were found, and pictures of the site where the Marine was killed by a roadside bomb on the day of the massacre - remain classified.

In a meeting with journalists in October, before the military had been told about the discovery of the documents, the American commander in charge of the logistics of the withdrawal said that files from the bases were either transferred to other parts of the military or incinerated.

"We don't put official paperwork in the trash," said the commander, Maj. Gen. Thomas Richardson, at the meeting at the American Embassy in Baghdad.

The documents were piled in military trailers and hauled to the junkyard by an Iraqi contractor who was trying to sell off the surplus from American bases, the junkyard attendant said. The attendant said he had no idea what any of the documents were about, only that they were important to the Americans.

He said that over the course of several weeks he had burned dozens and dozens of binders, turning more untold stories about the war into ash.

"What can we do with them?" the attendant said. "These things are worthless to us, but we understand they are important and it is better to burn them to protect the Americans. If they are leaving, it must mean their work here is done."

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+10 # Klanders 2011-12-15 10:11
War is awful!
 
 
+61 # artful 2011-12-15 10:33
Which is why we ought never to engage in War lightly, or as a result of outright lies, as was the case in Iraq. Bush & Co. should be tried as war criminals.
 
 
0 # giraffee2012 2011-12-16 13:51
Quoting artful:
Which is why we ought never to engage in War lightly, or as a result of outright lies, as was the case in Iraq. Bush & Co. should be tried as war criminals.

The GOP candidates 12/15/2011 are talking "war" again on Iran (same agenda as "W" & Iraq) - while no talk of keeping jobs in USA
 
 
+36 # WaldenPond 2011-12-15 11:42
War is what we Americans like. We like to start wars. We like to train for wars. We like to hear about wars. We like to watch war movies and documentaries. And we like to borrow trillions of dollars for our wars because we do not like to pay for the wars we like. We are a strange and dangerous people. Hopefully, we will go bankrupt, the sooner the better.
 
 
+6 # jwb110 2011-12-15 13:04
Quoting WaldenPond:
War is what we Americans like. We like to start wars. We like to train for wars. We like to hear about wars. We like to watch war movies and documentaries. And we like to borrow trillions of dollars for our wars because we do not like to pay for the wars we like. We are a strange and dangerous people. Hopefully, we will go bankrupt, the sooner the better.

If the "we" you keep talking about is so great how come the volunteer army isn't overflowing with new recrutes?
 
 
+15 # in deo veritas 2011-12-15 13:45
Good point! Maybe because the younger generation is realizing that all the regime wants them for is cannon fodder to enrich the traitors on Wall Street, primarily the "defense" contractors. If the bastards had a degree of honesty they would give it's old name back- the "war department". It hasn't been about defense since the cold war ended.
 
 
+7 # ruralhorseman 2011-12-15 16:21
"Teach your children well,
Their father's hell
Will slowly go by...."

CSN&Y
 
 
+5 # Archie1954 2011-12-15 20:25
Did you see what the vaunted military did with the remains of men and women killed in action? They threw them in a landfill! That is exactly what they do with cannon fodder.
 
 
+14 # in deo veritas 2011-12-15 14:00
Look at history-our major wars have not been fought with a volunteer army since the Civil War. That couldn't have taken place without a corrupt draft syatem where the wealthy could hire substitutes to go die for them or buy their way out of it. During the Vietnam War corrupt draft boards operated in the same way. If you look at the average age of soldiers in our wars the vast majority are young men from the middle or lower socioeconomic classes. Thew rich start the wars, the rest of us risk life and limb, and regardsless of the outcome, the rich alone profit but lose their souls if they ever had one.
 
 
+12 # maddave 2011-12-15 15:33
Several factors are at work here, jwb 110:
1. All wars are economic, and the people who start wars so readily don't have to fight them. If they did, we would be a much more peaceful, diplomatic nation.
2. While watching war flicks on TV, when someone gets shot the propagandists ensure that it's it's always either a minor flesh wound or a clean kill. You never see the death throes, the brains and the guts hanging out of a still-living person. You don't hear the cries and calls for help that's not coming. You don't smell the blood and the shit that accompanies battle wounds, We The People are sheltered from the gruesome truth of what is being done by and to our sons, brothers and friends.
3. Wars always start out as patriotic mass march-offs to "Keep the World Safe For Democracy", but as they drag on-and-on and the reality of war's barbarity becomes apparent to both the troops and the folks back home, enthusiastic enlistments tend to diminish . . . and with good reason.
 
 
+2 # Archie1954 2011-12-15 20:19
Sorry sir, the US is awful!
 
 
+6 # Archie1954 2011-12-15 20:22
What something evil like this episode reveals is how perverse the idea of American exceptionalism is and what it has done to degrade the US military into barbarism. That's right, it all comes down to Americans are the only worthwhile humans on the planet, everyone is just there for target practice or to allow the officers to get their jollies by torturing them.
 
 
+14 # Andrew Hansen 2011-12-15 10:47
'Secret' can now reliably be interpreted and an identifier of the-bad-things- we-did, the complete perversion of the originating purpose.
 
 
+3 # Doubter 2011-12-15 11:00
"the war had gone horribly wrong"
Sounds like 'standard operating procedure' for a foreign occupying force.
If you accept having your kids sent to conquer and occupy countries where they are obviously not wanted or needed you HAVE to accept having them behave EXACTLY as Hitler's Whermacht did under similar circumstances. I'm sure similar incidents are multiplying everywhere we are allowing our masters to send our kids. (boys will be boys...)
The SHAME is on ALL of us for allowing these shameful unwarranted unforgivable acts of aggression.
Are you going to allow them to pounce on Iran or are you going to do something about it?
I fear "they" will hit Iran any day to get our minds off of occupying their parks; I just hope the Army has enough sense to make it the first war where nobody shows up to fight.
 
 
+14 # Carolyn 2011-12-15 11:02
Tears are filling my eyes. I almost passed out when I read about the man in the wheel chair and then the slit throats. War makes heartless criminals of all who pariticipate. Soldiers in our time have become society's victims. i tis no longer noble to fight with the weaponry we have spent generations devising.
will the consiousness change before we start WW111? Nothing that is said or done at this level changes anything for the better. Our politicians out-shouting each other. We are down our knees morally -- worse -- our faces are in the dirt --. We are entering the long Dark Age. How long before Beauty, Art, Music embrace our lives.
 
 
+14 # Timaloha 2011-12-15 11:47
War was NEVER noble.
 
 
+12 # concernedhuman 2011-12-15 11:49
This has been happening in every war since the beginning of time. That is why the leaders should be sent in and fight it out themselves. War is war that means war kill everything if you want to live. There should never be any wars EVER!!! People follow the leaders they are the menace..
 
 
+17 # sandyboy 2011-12-15 12:06
Remember the movie In The Valley Of Elah, where Tommy Lee Jones flys the US flag upside-down as a distress signal? Maybe everyone should do that until these wars are stopped.
 
 
+4 # Doubter 2011-12-15 12:34
Great Idea!
 
 
+6 # jwb110 2011-12-15 13:06
Quoting Doubter:
Great Idea!

It is a simple process and more easily done than you know. During the entire Bush 8 years I always bought postage stamps with the US Flag on them and always put them on the envelopes upside-down.
 
 
+10 # maddave 2011-12-15 12:24
You people just don't understand - none of you! We want Iraqi oil, and if our getting it involves the slaughter of a few Indigenous civilians, well . . . that's a risk we're willing to take. I believe the term was "It's the cost of doing business."
 
 
+6 # futhark 2011-12-15 14:37
Yeah, it's not personal, it's just business!

At least Neocon former UN ambassador John Bolton was honest on that point when he criticised Barack Obama's order to withdraw troops from Iraq because it jeopardized access to the oil that our military machine had fought so hard to control.
 
 
+1 # Archie1954 2011-12-15 20:26
You are so right and it's America's exceptionalism showing.
 
 
+15 # km0591 2011-12-15 12:35
Yes, the Iraq war was wrong. In fact, it fits the category of the "crimes against peace" of Principle VI of the Nuremberg principles. We hung Nazis for that.

Still, it is very dangerous and unwise to dismiss what are blatant war crimes like these as the inevitable outcome of war. They are the result of catastrophic leadership failures at all levels, military and civilian, and pose a grave danger not just to other nations but to the safety of our own people. The recent Defense Authorization Bill passed and will be signed off by that duplicitous creep, Obama, should give one pause.

A very hard rain is gonna fall on this nation...

and many in that military and civilian leadership should be brought to account. But none have been. Yea, they got some low level NCO's for Abu Ghraib abuses, but no one else. My Lai
 
 
+10 # 1984 2011-12-15 12:40
It is disgusting that this article turns away from the massacre to marines being the victims of war and its stresses!!!! They are trained for war. It is outrageous to try to make us feel sorry for them. Arggggh!
 
 
+7 # Glen 2011-12-15 12:45
"It is accordance with our determination to refrain from aggression and build up a sentiment and practice among nations more favorable to peace ... that we have incurred the consent of fourteen important nations to the negotiation of a treaty condemning recourse to war, renouncing it as an instrument of national policy."


Calvin Coolidge
Calvin Coolidge (1872–1933), U.S. president. New York Times (August 16, 1928).

The U.S. government has become so much less than their promises.
 
 
+29 # teachnet 2011-12-15 13:34
This is NOT war. Iraq is not "at war" with the US. This is imperial invasion, occupation, rape, theft of resources and genocide.
 
 
+2 # futhark 2011-12-15 14:40
Right teachnet, a war must be declared by Congress, presumably after serious and objective investigation and deliberation and adequate consultation with the American people. The rush to invasion was also a roughshod trampling of the Constitution.
 
 
+12 # mwd870 2011-12-15 13:41
The Iraq War was the biggest waste of money and human life since Viet Nam. Afghanistan promises to take a greater toll. Lies and cover-ups are the standard of the military.

Yeah, Cheney's plan for the oil did not exactly work out. What a slug.
 
 
+4 # Douglas Jack 2011-12-15 13:45
Training for peace is an obligation for all of humanity. Instead of Canada, USA and NATO bombing Libya, we could have responded to the Green Party (Gaddafi) requests for formal international intervention and inquiries. Instead of the damming one-sided 'hate' campaigns raised by Social Media such as for the supposed Arab Spring and a thousand other monologues, we should be engaging both sides to formally dialogue and publish the resultes. Inquiries consider both sides https://sites.google.com/site/indigenecommunity/structure/1-both-sides-now-article Where-ever there is conflict or desire for peace, humanity has an obligation to identify the best-intentions (Mohandas Gandhi) of both-sides and then to help each side realize these intentions. War is futile, un-necessary and counter-product ive. Peace doesn't just happen. www.indigenecommunity.info
 
 
+3 # Peace Anonymous 2011-12-15 13:46
"Haditha became a defining moment of the war, helping cement an enduring Iraqi distrust of the United States and a resentment that not one Marine has been convicted." DUH!!! It sounds like Wall Street. We can do whatever we want, to whoever we want, whenever we want. And the ony sin is getting caught. When will America understand why the rest of the world feels the way it does? What will it take? How many more need to die?
 
 
+3 # in deo veritas 2011-12-15 13:53
What a surprise that this came out without Wiki Leaks! Don't be fooled into thinking that this is a sign that openness and transparency by the government are going to be an ongoing reality. The vast majority of our military are heroes but not all of them. None of those who put them in the line of fire are anything more than cowards and criminals. Otherwise they would do the fighting themselves for something honorable instead of unmitigated greed.
 
 
+7 # Magars 2011-12-15 14:17
...but the one that denounced all inmoral and shameful actionS of the United State Army, is in jail waiting for a unfair trial,after the President declared him guilty before proven innocent. Again,
THANK YOU BRADLEY MANNING FOR YOUR COURAGE, THOSE THAT ACCUSE YOU, ARE THE REAL DEFENDANTS!
 
 
+6 # angelfish 2011-12-15 14:33
Jacques Chirac was tried and recently found guilty of Fraud and the like in France. The French charge and try their former Presidents for Crimes, WHY don't WE? Bush and Co. MUST answer for their Crimes against our Constitution, our Country and Humanity itself! Our People deserve Justice, Justice Demands accountability! Since Reagan, there has been NO Justice OR Accountability! It is coming on Election Day 2012! The People, UNITED, will NEVER be defeated! Vote Democratic!
 
 
+4 # heraldmage 2011-12-15 14:50
If we the people continue to allow our government: to destabilize & overthrow governments by instigating revolution, funding USIP brainwashing of youth, arming of revolutionaries , or direct military intervention & occupation
allow the military brainwashing of our children against their social & religious upbringing making killing of innocent, children, women & men acceptable & heroic
than we as a nation, we & our allies are no different than the Nazi's and the Japanese of WW2.
Now that evidence of government corruption, lies, misrepresentati on & cover-up has been produced & verified it is our responsibility as citizen to remove & punish corrupted leaders & advisers & change the system that allowed our government to be co opted by greed & lust for power who lead this nation into illegal wars & continued aggression against sovereign nations.
If we don't do it, just as the Nazi were defeated at their peak an international coalition, weary of USA abuse will end USA imperialism, not by military intervention but through fiscal isolation or merely calling in the debt.
Our government is broke yet continues to spend our taxes on foreign adventures to expand corporate profits & maintain the 1% wealth rather than develop sound fiscal policy for gov't solvency while addressing the needs of the people & the nation: jobs, healthcare, education & infrastructure. While an investment in the nation is required to provide services they also produce tax revenue.
 
 
+3 # rom120 2011-12-15 15:43
Yes, the Iraq war was wrong. In fact, it fits the category of the "crimes against peace" of Principle VI of the Nuremberg principles. We hung Nazis for that.

Yes, as many who attended from the allied side said: "Nuernberg was a lynching party". Thousands were executed in Germany for much less than what the US soldiers did (in Germany) and now in Iraq. Plus the 750 000 German POWs who were deliberately starved to death under good old Ike. Sure, there are some "court-martials ", mostly a slap on the wrist. Nothing happens to the main criminals, Bush, Cheney and Co.
 
 
+3 # fredboy 2011-12-15 16:53
Amazing reasoning shared by the general: "it was just a cost of doing business on that particular engagement."

Is it possible to get a true count of Iraqi civilians killed? Then pile that many mannequins in a huge field, 50 deep, to show the world what we as a nation have done.
 
 
+3 # watcher 2011-12-15 18:48
America committed the worst crime of all time in Iraq.
In the media, you may hear about billions of dollars that were spent in cash, with no documents, disappeared,,, gone with the wind!! This huge institution of the US army is corrupt. Can anyone deny that? For sure, I know there are many decent soldiers. But your generals and leaders are corrupt and criminal war lords.
The war means business. To the extent that the "soldier" were to switched to become "contractor". Contractors don't abide by any rules, i.e., they don't care about the civilian casualties. Why? It is business, money, and corruption. What is the average daily rate paid for the contractors in Iraq? Is it $2,000 per day?! even more?!!
Poor Blackwater contractors beaten to death then hung on a bridge. That's a horrible crime that cannot be justified. BUT isn't that a trivial price to pay in return for the more horrible crimes committed daily by Blackwater mercenaries in Iraq? How much do poor Blackwater contractors get paid paid per day to make them stay to continue killing more Iraqies?
 
 
+2 # RMDC 2011-12-16 07:25
The entire war on terror is a massacre. It is all a war against civilians. The nations the US has attacked -- Afghanistan, Somalia, Yeman, Iraq, Libya, Syria, Pakistan, and more -- have no armies that are anything like a match for the US. The overwhelming fire-power of the US makes them all massacres. The war planners at the Pentagon and its right wing, neo-con think tanks know this and they acutally prefer it that way. The US does not attack nations that have militaries which could actually fight back.

The US is a criminal nation. There needs to be Nuremberg-style war crimes trial for all US leaders, including especially Obama and Patraeus. The whole world knows this; it is only most Amerikkkans who are in the dark and still wave flags and tell the military "we thank you for all that you do" without even knowing what they do.
 
 
+1 # boudreaux 2011-12-16 09:23
Quoting RMDC:
The entire war on terror is a massacre. It is all a war against civilians. The nations the US has attacked -- Afghanistan, Somalia, Yeman, Iraq, Libya, Syria, Pakistan, and more -- have no armies that are anything like a match for the US. The overwhelming fire-power of the US makes them all massacres. The war planners at the Pentagon and its right wing, neo-con think tanks know this and they acutally prefer it that way. The US does not attack nations that have militaries which could actually fight back.

The US is a criminal nation. There needs to be Nuremberg-style war crimes trial for all US leaders, including especially Obama and Patraeus. The whole world knows this; it is only most Amerikkkans who are in the dark and still wave flags and tell the military "we thank you for all that you do" without even knowing what the do.



The only thing that I think you should have added in this post is that we should have gone all the way back to the beginning of this war and held those who started this war accountable for it and not just Obama and Petraeus.
I totally agree that the US is a criminal nation and the criminals are getting away with their crimes.
 

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