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'Way Too Late': Inside Amazon's Biggest Outbreak
Written by <a href="index.php?option=com_comprofiler&task=userProfile&user=54400"><span class="small">Karen Weise, The New York Times</span></a>   
Tuesday, 19 May 2020 12:53

Weise writes: "Therese Kelly arrived for her shift at an Amazon warehouse on March 27 to find her co-workers standing clustered in the cavernous space."

Therese Kelly, a longtime Amazon employee, said many safety measures were not followed at the warehouse in Hazle Township, PA. She tested positive for Covid-19. (photo: Michelle Gustafson/NYT)
Therese Kelly, a longtime Amazon employee, said many safety measures were not followed at the warehouse in Hazle Township, PA. She tested positive for Covid-19. (photo: Michelle Gustafson/NYT)


'Way Too Late': Inside Amazon's Biggest Outbreak

By Karen Weise, The New York Times

19 May 20


A warehouse in the foothills of the Poconos has had more known Covid-19 cases than any of Amazon’s others after missing early opportunities to protect workers.

herese Kelly arrived for her shift at an Amazon warehouse on March 27 to find her co-workers standing clustered in the cavernous space. They were awaiting a buildingwide announcement, a rarity at the complex known as AVP1. Over a loudspeaker, a manager told them what they had feared: For the first time, an employee had tested positive for the coronavirus.

Some of the workers cut short their shifts and went home. Ms. Kelly, 63, got to work, one of the hundreds of thousands of Amazon employees dealing with the spike in online orders from millions of Americans quarantined at home.

In the less than two months since then, the warehouse in the foothills of the Pocono Mountains of northeastern Pennsylvania has become Amazon’s biggest Covid-19 hot spot. More employees at AVP1 have been infected by the coronavirus than at any of Amazon’s roughly 500 other facilities in the United States.

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