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Democratic Leaders Willing to Risk Party Damage to Stop Bernie Sanders
Written by <a href="index.php?option=com_comprofiler&task=userProfile&user=53463"><span class="small">Lisa Lerer and Reid J. Epstein, The New York Times</span></a>   
Thursday, 27 February 2020 09:31

Excerpt: "Dozens of interviews with Democratic establishment leaders this week show that they are not just worried about Mr. Sanders's candidacy, but are also willing to risk intraparty damage to stop his nomination at the national convention in July if they get the chance."

Senator Bernie Sanders. (photo: Erin Schaff/The New York Times)
Senator Bernie Sanders. (photo: Erin Schaff/The New York Times)


Democratic Leaders Willing to Risk Party Damage to Stop Bernie Sanders

By Lisa Lerer and Reid J. Epstein, The New York Times

26 February 20


Interviews with dozens of Democratic Party officials, including 93 superdelegates, found overwhelming opposition to handing Mr. Sanders the nomination if he fell short of a majority of delegates.

ouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senator Chuck Schumer, the minority leader, hear constant warnings from allies about congressional losses in November if the party nominates Bernie Sanders for president. Democratic House members share their Sanders fears on text-messaging chains. Bill Clinton, in calls with old friends, vents about the party getting wiped out in the general election.

And officials in the national and states parties are increasingly anxious about splintered primaries on Super Tuesday and beyond, where the liberal Mr. Sanders edges out moderate candidates who collectively win more votes.

Dozens of interviews with Democratic establishment leaders this week show that they are not just worried about Mr. Sanders’s candidacy, but are also willing to risk intraparty damage to stop his nomination at the national convention in July if they get the chance. Since Mr. Sanders’s victory in Nevada’s caucuses on Saturday, The Times has interviewed 93 party officials — all of them superdelegates, who could have a say on the nominee at the convention — and found overwhelming opposition to handing the Vermont senator the nomination if he arrived with the most delegates but fell short of a majority.

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