RSN Fundraising Banner
Mexicans Protest Over Alleged Rape of Teenage Girls by Police Officers
Written by <a href="index.php?option=com_comprofiler&task=userProfile&user=43829"><span class="small">Maya Oppenheim, The Independent</span></a>   
Tuesday, 13 August 2019 13:31

Oppenheim writes: "Hundreds of protesters took to the streets of Mexico City calling for justice for two teenage girls who were allegedly raped by police officers."

Mexico's security minister Jesus Orta Martínez was enveloped in pink glitter when he tried to reassure the women both cases would be properly investigated. (photo: AFP/Getty Images)
Mexico's security minister Jesus Orta Martínez was enveloped in pink glitter when he tried to reassure the women both cases would be properly investigated. (photo: AFP/Getty Images)


Mexicans Protest Over Alleged Rape of Teenage Girls by Police Officers

By Maya Oppenheim, The Independent

13 August 19


Demonstrators advanced on prosecutor’s office - smashing door and leaving pig's head outside

undreds of protesters took to the streets of Mexico City calling for justice for two teenage girls who were allegedly raped by police officers.

The first case involves a 17-year-old girl who said four policemen raped her in their patrol car in Azcapotzalco, in the Mexican capital’s north, on 3 August. 

The saga has sparked outrage after the city lawyer, Ernestina Godoy, last week admitted the officers have yet to have been charged because officials are waiting for the victim to identify the perpetrators.

In the other case, just six days later, a 16-year-old girl said a policeman raped her in a museum in the city centre. A policeman was arrested on Thursday.

Around 300 protesters, who were predominantly women, descended on the city’s security headquarters and the capital’s prosecutor’s office on Monday. They voiced their anger at the two recent cases – shouting “justice” and “they don’t protect us, they rape us” at officers.

The demonstrators, equipped with pink glitter and spray paint, advanced on the prosecutor’s office and smashed its door and left a pig’s head outside.

Mexico’s security minister Jesus Orta Martínez was enveloped in pink glitter when he tried to reassure the women both cases would be properly investigated.

Claudia Sheinbaum, Mexico City’s first elected female mayor, branded the demonstration a “provocation”. At a press conference, she said the authorities would carry out justice but labelled the demonstrators provocateurs.

She said: “We are not going to fall for any provocation, this was a provocation. They wanted the government to use violent methods and in no way will we fall for it. There will be an investigation and the prosecutors’ office will resolve it”.

Ms Sheinbaum said “due to the seriousness of the case“ the Human Rights Commission of Mexico City would be involved in the investigation.

Violence against women is prevalent in Mexico – according to United Nations figures, an average of nine women are believed to be murdered every day.

According to the Mexican Institute of Statistics and Geography, 44 per cent of women have suffered violence from a partner and 66 per cent of women have experienced some form of violence during their life. 

The country’s criminal code specifically references femicides – defining the crime as one “that deprives a woman of her life for gendered reasons” and citing evidence of it as including signs of sexual violence, “degrading” injuries, a history of violence at home, work or school.

In October 2018, Mexicans were left shocked by news of a couple who admitted to having murdered more than 20 women in Ecatepec, a suburb northeast of Mexico City. This case thrust the subject of femicide into the national spotlight once again – with local media branding the couple the “monsters of Ecatepec”.

Femicide is defined around the world as the deliberate killing of a woman or girl because of their gender. The United Nations notes these gender-related murders may come after other violent acts including domestic abuse – describing the climate in Latin America as one of “high tolerance” towards such “normalised” attacks.

According to the United Nations, Latin America has the world’s highest rates of femicide.

Email This Page

e-max.it: your social media marketing partner
 

Comments   

A note of caution regarding our comment sections:

For months a stream of media reports have warned of coordinated propaganda efforts targeting political websites based in the U.S., particularly in the run-up to the 2016 presidential election.

We too were alarmed at the patterns we were, and still are, seeing. It is clear that the provocateurs are far more savvy, disciplined, and purposeful than anything we have ever experienced before.

It is also clear that we still have elements of the same activity in our article discussion forums at this time.

We have hosted and encouraged reader expression since the turn of the century. The comments of our readers are the most vibrant, best-used interactive feature at Reader Supported News. Accordingly, we are strongly resistant to interrupting those services.

It is, however, important to note that in all likelihood hardened operatives are attempting to shape the dialog our community seeks to engage in.

Adapt and overcome.

Marc Ash
Founder, Reader Supported News

 
+2 # Texas Aggie 2019-08-14 09:28
Claudia Scheinbaum has filed charges against the women who broke the window and left the pig's head. The girl who was raped by the four cops (and they have been identified) now refuses to testify against them because her name and address have been released by the authorities so that the cops can threaten her and her family. This is definitely against the law in Mexico because she is a minor, but impunity has always trumped justice. It is as bad there as in the US.