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Gun Violence in 2019: There Have Been 251 Mass Shootings in the US in 216 Days
Written by <a href="index.php?option=com_comprofiler&task=userProfile&user=24110"><span class="small">Daniel Politi, Slate</span></a>   
Sunday, 04 August 2019 13:08

Politi writes: "It was a particularly deadly 24 hours in the United States as a shooting spree early Sunday morning in Dayton, Ohio, which left at least 10 dead, including the gunman, took place less than a day after a gunman opened fire at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, and killed at least 20 people."

St Pius X Church held a vigil for victims after the mass shooting in El Paso, Texas, on Saturday. (photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)
St Pius X Church held a vigil for victims after the mass shooting in El Paso, Texas, on Saturday. (photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)


Gun Violence in 2019: There Have Been 251 Mass Shootings in the US in 216 Days

By Daniel Politi, Slate

04 August 19

 

t was a particularly deadly 24 hours in the United States as a shooting spree early Sunday morning in Dayton, Ohio, which left at least 10 dead, including the gunman, took place less than a day after a gunman opened fire at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, and killed at least 20 people. The violence in Dayton, which took place on the 216th day of the year, marked the 251st mass shooting of 2019, according to the Gun Violence Archive. The nonprofit organization counts as a mass shooting any incident in which four or more people were shot or killed, without including the shooter.

Even though the numbers illustrate just how common gun violence is in the United States, the killings seen over the weekend were particularly shocking. The El Paso attack was the deadliest mass shooting of the year, while the killings in Dayton marked the third-deadliest shooting of the year. The second-deadliest shooting of the year took place in May, when a gunman opened fire at a municipal building in Virginia Beach and killed 12 people.

While the term “mass shooting” is used frequently, there isn’t a legal definition that clearly differentiates it from other types of shootings. The Department of Justice defines a “mass killing” as any episode in which there are “three or more killings in a single episode.” Using that definition, the violence in Dayton Sunday morning marked the 32nd mass killing of the year, reports the New York Times.

The shooting in El Paso on Saturday was the eighth deadliest in modern U.S. history and cemented Texas as a state where many of these mass killings take place. Of the 10 deadliest mass shootings in modern American history, four have taken place in Texas, notes CNN.

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+1 # Ken Halt 2019-08-05 05:20
Sensible and effective gun regulation is long overdue in the US.
 
 
+1 # Rodion Raskolnikov 2019-08-05 05:33
I think we can now say that mass murders are just a part of American culture. There is no solution and no way to stop them. This is a part of America just as much as violence in entertainment, wars and the celebration of killing dark skinned people outside of the US, video gaming, shopping, drinking/drug use, fundamentalist cults, and corrupt corporations and politicians.

Whenever there is a mass shooting, all the talking heads begin to spout "solutions" such as banning assault weapons, universal background checks, and so on. But now they are admitting that none of these will make much difference. The mass murders are just beyond any control of anyone. They can happen any where and at any time. They are just what America has become.

This author concludes that the El Paso shooting has "cemented Texas as a state where many of these mass killings take place. " Well, it also cemented the whole US as the place where mass killings take place.
 
 
0 # skylinefirepest 2019-08-05 19:31
Your's is the best comment so far. I don't see any way to stop them because we don't know who will be the next. A liberal comment earlier today said that we can't blame mental health for the problem but I personally think that ANYONE who harms another person or animal is mentally deficient. But we put armed guards on our streets and give them the right to use deadly force to protect the citizenry and it has been proven many times that gun free zones are targets for these animals. Ban a weapon? Are you serious? You don't remember what a truck and some fertilizer did? You don't remember what some Isis inspired illegal alien did with driving a truck down a crowded sidewalk? Guns are not the problem, folks, and it's high time everyone realized that and stopped saying that "just a little more gun control will solve the problem". What is the solution? I don't know but it is a recent problem...the last 20-30 years is where people started using guns to make their hatred known. The NRA is NOT at fault, gun owners are NOT at fault, Trump is NOT at fault, demo's and repub's are NOT at fault, our laws are NOT at fault. My personal solution for myself and my family is to carry and maintain situational awareness...som ething that is ingrained into each first responder. And we need to put our house in order!
 
 
0 # tedrey 2019-08-05 05:43
Why can't the rank and file of the NRA clean house? Some acceptable steps are obvious, and surely they don't want to stink in the eyes of the world.
 
 
+2 # elizabethblock 2019-08-05 08:16
The Texas killer said he was protesting against the "invasion" of nonwhites into Texas. He doesn't know Texas history. (Well, surprise. Americans mostly don't know history, including their own.)
From Laurence Wright's "God Save Texas": Texas was founded by Stephen Austin as a cotton empire, with slave labor. Mexico (of which Texas was a part at that time) had outlawed slavery in 1829, but made an exemption for Texas. In 1845, with the price of cotton plummeting, Texas had to choose: be annexed by the US as a slave state, or stay independent with a bailout from the UK. But Britain had outlawed slavery, and would force them to pay wages for all labor. They chose slavery.

And (of course) not only Texas, but the entire southwest of the US, used to be part of Mexico, till it was seized in the Gadsden "purchase". It's the anglos who are invaders.