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Trump to Nominate Eugene Scalia, Late Supreme Court Justice's Son, as Labor Secretary
Written by <a href="index.php?option=com_comprofiler&task=userProfile&user=51189"><span class="small">Nina Totenberg and Domenico Montanaro, NPR</span></a>   
Friday, 19 July 2019 08:18

Excerpt: "President Trump will nominate Eugene Scalia, son of late Justice Antonin Scalia, to be the next labor secretary, the president announced via Twitter Thursday evening."

Eugene Scalia (left) talks with Missouri senator Kit Bond before Scalia's confirmation hearing to be solicitor of the Labor Department in 2001. (photo: Tom Williams/Getty)
Eugene Scalia (left) talks with Missouri senator Kit Bond before Scalia's confirmation hearing to be solicitor of the Labor Department in 2001. (photo: Tom Williams/Getty)


Trump to Nominate Eugene Scalia, Late Supreme Court Justice's Son, as Labor Secretary

By Nina Totenberg and Domenico Montanaro, NPR

19 July 19

 

resident Trump will nominate Eugene Scalia, son of late Justice Antonin Scalia, to be the next labor secretary, the president announced via Twitter Thursday evening.

A source close to Scalia earlier Thursday confirmed to NPR that the president had offered Scalia the job and that he accepted.

Scalia, 55, is a partner at the law firm Gibson Dunn & Crutcher in Washington, D.C., where he handles cases related to labor and employment.

In the early 1990s, Scalia served as a special assistant to Attorney General William Barr during Barr's first stint leading the Justice Department. Scalia also served as the solicitor of the U.S. Labor Department, the agency's top lawyer, during the George W. Bush administration.

Current Labor Secretary Alex Acosta resigned effective Friday. Acosta has been caught up in controversy surrounding his handling of a plea deal involving financier Jeffrey Epstein. Epstein pleaded guilty to felony charges of soliciting minors for prostitution. He also had to register as a sex offender.

Epstein is facing new charges in New York of sex trafficking.

In 2005, Wal-Mart hired Scalia to defend it against lawsuits from former employees who said they were fired for calling out wrongdoing within the company.

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+1 # chapdrum 2019-07-19 18:03
One crime family wasn't enough for resilient, boot-strapping Americans.
Now we have two. And what party do they proudly represent?
 
 
0 # MikeAF48 2019-07-20 10:34
American Growers & Mexican Pickers Washington has no sense of the present reality in the American Heartland nor do I. The growers are caught between a rock and a hard place. Robert Sakata of Sakata Farms in Brighton, CO. announced at the 2018 Adams County growers gather-ing that he could no longer afford to grow sweet corn, so impossible had it become to find American workers to pick corn by hand, and so costly was it to import part-time workers from Mexico through the H-2A program. That decision made front-page news in Denver.