RSN Fundraising Banner
Democratic Lawmaker Al Green Introduces Articles of Impeachment Against Trump
Written by <a href="index.php?option=com_comprofiler&task=userProfile&user=51175"><span class="small">Rachael Bade, The Washington Post</span></a>   
Wednesday, 17 July 2019 08:20

Bade writes: "Rep. Al Green filed articles of impeachment against President Trump on Tuesday night, triggering a contentious vote in the coming days to confront an issue that has bitterly divided the Democratic Party."

Houston Democratic congressman Al Green participates in an event on May 9, 2019, urging the U.S. House of Representatives to start impeachment proceedings against Donald Trump. (photo: Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/AP)
Houston Democratic congressman Al Green participates in an event on May 9, 2019, urging the U.S. House of Representatives to start impeachment proceedings against Donald Trump. (photo: Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/AP)


ALSO SEE: 'Unfit to Be President': Full Text of House
Impeachment Resolution on Trump

Democratic Lawmaker Al Green Introduces Articles of Impeachment Against Trump

By Rachael Bade, The Washington Post

17 July 19

 

ep. Al Green filed articles of impeachment against President Trump on Tuesday night, triggering a contentious vote in the coming days to confront an issue that has bitterly divided the Democratic Party.

The Texas congressman, who notified Democratic leaders of his decision on Tuesday, said the House must impeach Trump for racist remarks suggesting four minority congresswoman “go back” to their ancestral countries as well as other comments made in the past. The four Democrats — Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (N.Y.), Ilhan Omar (Minn.), Ayanna Pressley (Mass.) and Rashida Tlaib (Mich.) — are all citizens; three were born in the United States. 

“Donald John Trump has, by his statements, brought the high office of the President of the United States in contempt, ridicule, disgrace and disrepute, has sown discord among the people of the United States, has demonstrated that he is unfit to be President, and has betrayed his trust as President of the United States to the manifest injury of the people of the United States, and has committed a high misdemeanor in office,” Green read from his resolution on the House floor Tuesday night.

Green’s move will force House Democrats to deal with the issue in the near term because of the privileged nature of the resolution. Under House rules, Democratic leadership can decide to try to table the impeachment articles, effectively killing them for now and risk criticism from the party’s liberal base; refer them to the House Judiciary Committee for possible consideration; or allow the vote to proceed. 

If leaders do nothing, Green can force a vote on the impeachment articles in two legislative days. 

The move comes as more than 80 members of the House have called for launching an impeachment inquiry. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) has resisted, however, encouraging her chairmen to keep investigating the president for potential abuse of power and obstruction of justice.

The matter is likely to divide the caucus, which has grappled for months with the question of what to do about Trump. Even impeachment proponents seemed divided about whether it is wise to force the issue now.  House Homeland Security Chairman Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.) said he would support an immediate move to impeach the president, even voting against Democratic leaders should they try to refer the matter to committee to sideline the debate.

“In all probability, I’d vote against it, because I’m prepared to vote,” he said of the possibility of leadership moving to table or refer the resolution to committee. “My district wants me to vote for the immediate impeachment of Donald Trump.”

 But others, such as Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-Md.), a strong impeachment backer, hesitated.

“We’re trying to keep the caucus together as we respond to the most lawless administration of our lifetimes,” Raskin said. “I'm enough of a political pragmatist to believe that you call votes when you think you can win them, not when you think you can lose them.”

Certain to be wary are moderates and lawmakers from districts that Trump won in 2016 who have long feared blowback for such a vote. Rep. Stephanie Murphy (Fla.), who leads the conservative Blue Dog Democrats, said, “I don’t think that we have completed the process or the investigations that we need to, to take that step at this time.” Rep. Jeff Van Drew (D-N.J.), a freshman from a swing district, said he would vote against the resolution. 

“I don’t think we’re there yet. I don’t think it’s healthy,” he said of Green’s effort.

Leadership, including Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee Chairman Cheri Bustos (Ill.), was resigned to the likelihood that they could not stop the vote, even if they wanted to.

“I can’t control what another member does, so it looks like that’s going to happen and we’re just going to have to deal with that,” Bustos said.

Leadership officials said Pelosi probably would refer the articles of impeachment to the Judiciary Committee or table them, though her office has not weighed in on the matter. Some Democratic aides, however, worry that Pelosi could struggle to find the votes to refer to the panel because it would take a majority of her caucus. Republicans, according to a senior GOP leadership aide, are probably will not help deliver those votes. 

The officials spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss private deliberations.

Some have questioned the timing of Green’s move. The House Judiciary Committee is scheduled to receive testimony from former special counsel Robert S. Mueller III next Wednesday, perhaps the most high-profile hearing in decades. Impeachment proponents hoped Mueller would spark new supporters, but they’re not sure Trump’s racist tweets will have the same effect.

Leadership, meanwhile, advanced a resolution condemning Trump’s attacks on their colleagues, alleviating some of the pressure that party leaders were under to respond to the president’s sharp words about the four congresswomen. House Rules Committee Chairman Jim McGovern (D-Mass.), a close Pelosi ally, tried to keep the focus on the former, which was slated to pass Tuesday night.

“Look, this is an important vote we’re going to have today,” he said. “This is the first time that I can recall that we’re actually . . . condemning the president for his words, which were racist, and it’s disgusting,” he said. “This is not normal. This is so divisive.”

Rep. Cedric L. Richmond (D-La.) said that if Green forces the matter, “I’m going to vote for it.” But Richmond wondered whether it was “the most strategic thing right now without a game plan.”

“I just don’t think that impeachment is going to happen before Mueller testifies, before we gain more evidence and all those other things,” he said.

Email This Page

e-max.it: your social media marketing partner
 

Comments   

A note of caution regarding our comment sections:

For months a stream of media reports have warned of coordinated propaganda efforts targeting political websites based in the U.S., particularly in the run-up to the 2016 presidential election.

We too were alarmed at the patterns we were, and still are, seeing. It is clear that the provocateurs are far more savvy, disciplined, and purposeful than anything we have ever experienced before.

It is also clear that we still have elements of the same activity in our article discussion forums at this time.

We have hosted and encouraged reader expression since the turn of the century. The comments of our readers are the most vibrant, best-used interactive feature at Reader Supported News. Accordingly, we are strongly resistant to interrupting those services.

It is, however, important to note that in all likelihood hardened operatives are attempting to shape the dialog our community seeks to engage in.

Adapt and overcome.

Marc Ash
Founder, Reader Supported News

 
+2 # mill valley maven 2019-07-17 09:59
ITMFA!
 
 
+5 # DongiC 2019-07-17 10:05
Events are coming together to form a huge juggernaut of criticism of the Trump regime. His indiscriminate use of twitter and his nasty disposition has landed him in a deep mess. The PRESIDENT HAS NO ONE TO BLAME BUT HIMSELF FOR HIS CURRENT TROUBLES. I wonder who will be his next scapegoat. Pence, perhaps?
 
 
+7 # Texas Aggie 2019-07-17 11:02
"encouraging her chairmen to keep investigating the president for potential abuse of power and obstruction of justice."

If they would actually investigate him instead of sitting on their hands and tut-tutting about him ignoring their subpoenas, then they wouldn't be having this problem. But her chairmen aren't doing their job of investigating him and forcing him to obey subpoenas. The lethargy of House leadership is what is frustrating and leads to people going ahead and doing it on their own.
 
 
+4 # giraffee23 2019-07-17 12:30
Remember how Hitler came to power? Trump is the new Hitler type person. Brown/Black instead of Jews = the agenda is the same. But remember (all who are not part of the rich) they will come for you (or your assets) in time.