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Trump Insists That His Notorious Charlottesville Comments Were Actually Perfect
Written by <a href="index.php?option=com_comprofiler&task=userProfile&user=45696"><span class="small">Rafi Schwartz, Splinter</span></a>   
Friday, 26 April 2019 13:00

Schwartz writes: "President Donald Trump insisted on Friday that his Nazi-coddling comments about 'very fine people on both sides' at the infamous Charlottesville rally in 2017 were a terrific response to the white supremacist violence that killed protester Heather Heyer."

White supremacists led a torch march though the grounds of University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia. (photo: Andrew Shurtleff/The Daily Progress)
White supremacists led a torch march though the grounds of University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia. (photo: Andrew Shurtleff/The Daily Progress)


Trump Insists That His Notorious Charlottesville Comments Were Actually Perfect

By Rafi Schwartz, Splinter

26 April 19

 

resident Donald Trump insisted on Friday that his Nazi-coddling comments about “very fine people on both sides” at the infamous Charlottesville rally in 2017 were a terrific response to the white supremacist violence that killed protester Heather Heyer.

Claiming that he’d answered that question “perfectly,” Trump insisted that he was “talking about people that went [to the Unite the Right rally] because they felt very strongly about the monument to Robert E. Lee, a great general.”

Here, for the record, is what Trump actually said shortly after the Charlottesville rally:

They didn’t put themselves down as neo-Nazis, and you had some very bad people in that group. But you also had people that were very fine people on both sides. You had people in that group – excuse me, excuse me, I saw the same pictures you did. You had people in that group that were there to protest the taking down of, to them, a very, very important statue and the renaming of a park from Robert E. Lee to another name.

Of course, the Unite the Right rally attendees did, in fact, put themselves down as neo-Nazis: The rally itself was organized by a host of white supremacist groups, including the Traditionalist Workers Party, Vanguard America, and the League of the South, and was promoted by Nazi websites like the Daily Stormer.

Nevertheless, Trump continued to insist on Friday that the event was simply about a statue, saying that “Whether you like it or not, [Lee] was one of the great generals”—which is like saying that it’s fine to memorialize Nazi general Hermann Göring because he won a lot of battles. (Also, lest we forget, Lee lost.)

In the nearly two years since Unite the Right and Heyer’s death, Friday’s comments are Trump’s most explicit defense of his initial response to the rally, although he has tried to push back on criticism in the past. At a rally in Phoenix, AZ, several weeks after his initial comments, Trump read a redacted portion of his post-Charlottesville remarks in which he did condemn neo-Nazis and white supremacists. He did not, however, include his “very fine people on both sides” line.

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+12 # BetaTheta 2019-04-26 17:37
Wonder what people would say if the German-American community erected a monument to Erwin Rommel, another great general who fought for a bad cause?
 
 
+2 # Stilldreamin1 2019-04-27 05:22
It's part of his appeal to his neo-Nazi base, along with his spurious claim that his father was born in the fatherland. Miller must be whispering in his ear.
 
 
+2 # Citizen Mike 2019-04-27 08:18
Benedict Arnold won a great victory at Ticonderoga before he turned traitor but I do not see any statues here in his honor. Lee was a United States officer who betrayed his oath and turned traitor, and treason is defined as making war on your own country.
 
 
+1 # PABLO DIABLO 2019-04-27 13:33
Yeah, and Hitler was a Christian.
 
 
0 # DongiC 2019-04-27 17:17
Signed a Concordat with Eugenie Pacelli then Papal Nuncio to Germany. Later Pacelli became Pius XII.
 
 
0 # tidyidy 2019-04-28 08:00
Anyone's history can become regrettable as time moves away from the triumphant moment.

Our monuments should remain in place, always, with information added to plaques as future generations evaluate the results.

It's highly likely that both the Union and Confederate soldiers, lacking the minute by minute coverage of TV and MSM news coverage, truly believed in what they were doing. That honest belief deserves our respect. It deserves, as well, that we honor their intent as we look back even as we realize disappointment in some of the results that have become apparent only now.

L&B&L
 
 
0 # draypoker 2019-04-28 10:09
I think comparing Trump with these various traitors does not really explain his personality. The important thing about Trump that he is ignorant and hardly educated.The best hope for his time in office is that he will be frustrated by others refusing to implement his daft incompetent policies.