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Dismay as Trump Vetoes Bill to End US Support for War in Yemen
Written by <a href="index.php?option=com_comprofiler&task=userProfile&user=492"><span class="small">Ed Pilkington, Guardian UK</span></a>   
Wednesday, 17 April 2019 08:21

Pilkington writes: "Donald Trump has vetoed a bill passed by Congress to end US military assistance in Saudi Arabia's war in Yemen."

A boy walks on rubble of a house after it was destroyed by a Saudi-led air strike in Yemen's capital Sanaa. (photo: Reuters)
A boy walks on rubble of a house after it was destroyed by a Saudi-led air strike in Yemen's capital Sanaa. (photo: Reuters)


Dismay as Trump Vetoes Bill to End US Support for War in Yemen

By Ed Pilkington, Guardian UK

17 April 19


Politicians decry Trump’s decision to continue US involvement in it as a cynical move and missed opportunity for humanitarian help

onald Trump has vetoed a bill passed by Congress to end US military assistance in Saudi Arabia’s war in Yemen.

The Senate had passed a bipartisan resolution on 13 March in a 54-to-46 vote, in a move that was largely seen as a rebuke of Trump’s alliance with the Saudi forces leading military action in Yemen. The House voted on the resolution in early April, passing it with 247 votes to 175.

“This resolution is an unnecessary, dangerous attempt to weaken my constitutional authorities, endangering the lives of American citizens and brave service members, both today and in the future,” Trump wrote in explaining his veto.

The US provides billions of dollars of arms to the Saudi-led coalition fighting against Iran-backed rebels in Yemen.

But as the war drags on, members of Congress have expressed concern about the thousands of civilians killed in coalition airstrikes since the conflict began in 2014.

Trump’s veto, the second of his presidency, led to outpourings of dismay from politicians and NGOs. Nancy Pelosi, the Democratic speaker of the House of Representatives, called on him to “put peace before politics”. She called the Yemen conflict a “horrific humanitarian crisis that challenges the conscience of the entire world” and decried Trump’s decision to continue US involvement in it as a cynical move.

Senator Bernie Sanders, who sponsored the bill in the Senate, said: “I am disappointed, but not surprised, that Trump has rejected the bipartisan resolution to end US involvement in the horrific war in Yemen. The people of Yemen desperately need humanitarian help, not more bombs.”

The California congressman Ro Khanna, a Democrat, added: “From a president elected on the promise of putting a stop to our endless wars, this veto is a painful missed opportunity.” Khanna argued the bill marked a step forward, despite the veto. “It sends a clear signal to the Saudis that they need to lift their blockade and allow humanitarian assistance into Yemen if they care about their relationship with Congress,” Khanna said.

The fighting in the Arab world’s poorest country has left millions suffering from shortages of food and medical care and has pushed the country to the brink of famine.

David Miliband, the former British foreign secretary who now heads the International Rescue Committee, denounced the veto as “morally wrong and strategically wrongheaded”. In a statement he said Yemen was at “breaking point with 10m people on the brink of famine”.

Oxfam America said the veto would not stop the campaign to end US support for the Saudi military action. “America stands with Yemen. This fight is far from over,” the global humanitarian aid group said in a tweet.

Many lawmakers have grown uneasy with Trump’s close relationship with Saudi Arabia.

Lawmakers criticized the president for failing to condemn the country for the killing of Jamal Khashoggi, a Saudi journalist who lived in the United States and had written critically about the kingdom. Khashoggi entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul last October and never came out. Intelligence agencies said the Saudi crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman, was complicit in the killing.

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+14 # Rodion Raskolnikov 2019-04-17 09:25
Since this bill had bi-partisan support, this is now one good opportunity to isolate Trump. It is also a very important issue in itself. A substantial majority of Americans oppose these senseless killings of innocent people. The war against Yemen is just a plain and clear massacre by the Saudi and American regimes.

I hope Congress will keep the pressure on Trump over important issues like this one. I've long been a critic of the nothing burger of Muellergate and Russophobia. But this one is something and Trump has made his support for criminal murder and pumping billions of dollars in to US weapons makers very clear.
 
 
+15 # futhark 2019-04-17 10:05
“It sends a clear signal to the Saudis that they need to lift their blockade and allow humanitarian assistance into Yemen if they care about their relationship with Congress.”

It also sends a clear signal that Donald Trump values his relationship with the repressive tyranny that is the Saudi regime and his friendship with the Military-Indust rial Complex more than he does his relationship with the representatives of the American people or the people themselves. It is thus a clear signal to the People that, come 2020, he deserves to be ousted.
 
 
0 # rural oregon progressive 2019-04-20 01:06
Yep, and no matter how much the Orange Liar-in-Chief may protest in the future, he now OWNS Yemen, and all the horrors that go with it. This from the guy who ran his campaign (in part) on getting the US out of endless wars and foreign butchery at the hands of the US.
 
 
+9 # Anne Frank 2019-04-17 10:19
As expected: Trump is MBS's bitch, and MBS is Natanyahu's bitch.
 
 
+11 # johnescher 2019-04-17 10:27
Why do we have to have such an idiot as president*?
 
 
0 # apotem 2019-04-17 10:40
Nothing lasts forever
 
 
+2 # rural oregon progressive 2019-04-20 01:14
Quoting johnescher:
Why do we have to have such an idiot as president*?

Because the American public has been dumbed-down for the past 40 years. Dumb electorates provide for dumb decisions... That has given us our current MSM, right-wing ideology, and the return of serf/overlord economy. If people don't think "critically", they are more inclined to buy the propaganda. The US government and the oligarchy do not want Americans to think critically. If they did, we'd end up with more AOCs and someone like Bernie Sanders as president. That simply will not do!
 
 
+7 # PABLO DIABLO 2019-04-17 13:17
Vote in 2020. Get rid of Trump/Bolton/Po mpeo and this whole despicable bunch in one vote. Vote Progressive and take back "our" government.
 
 
0 # tedrey 2019-04-17 15:32
If you hand the keys over to the mob, you can't expect to ever get them back. After the hostile takeover nothing remains but the bloody carcass of a once working state. And perhaps the partial satisfaction of an anarchic crowd in a lynching mood.