RSN Fundraising Banner
French Court Finds Bayer's Monsanto Liable for Farmer's Sickness
Written by <a href="index.php?option=com_comprofiler&task=userProfile&user=50559"><span class="small">Simon Carraud and Catherine Lagrange, Reuters</span></a>   
Friday, 12 April 2019 13:45

Excerpt: "A French court has ruled that Monsanto was liable for the sickness of a farmer who inhaled one of its weedkillers, in another legal setback for the Bayer-owned business over health claims."

French cereal farmer Paul Francois, head of the Phyto-Victims association, attends a news conference after the verdict in his appeals trial against U.S. Monsanto firm, in Paris, France. (photo: Charles Platiau/Reuters)
French cereal farmer Paul Francois, head of the Phyto-Victims association, attends a news conference after the verdict in his appeals trial against U.S. Monsanto firm, in Paris, France. (photo: Charles Platiau/Reuters)


French Court Finds Bayer's Monsanto Liable for Farmer's Sickness

By Simon Carraud and Catherine Lagrange, Reuters

12 April 19

 

French court has ruled that Monsanto was liable for the sickness of a farmer who inhaled one of its weedkillers, in another legal setback for the Bayer-owned business over health claims.

In the latest stage of a decade-long legal tussle, the appeals court in Lyon on Thursday found in favor of farmer Paul Francois’ claim that Monsanto’s Lasso weedkiller had made him sick and that the product’s labeling had been inadequate.

Francois, 55, says he suffered neurological problems, including memory loss, fainting and headaches, after accidentally inhaling Lasso in 2004 while working on his farm.

“Mr Francois justifiably concludes that the product, due to its inadequate labeling that did not respect applicable regulations, did not offer the level of safety he could legitimately expect,” the court said in its ruling.

The latest verdict, however, did not determine compensation for the farmer, which will now be considered by another court in Lyon.

Francois is seeking about 1 million euros ($1.1 million) in damages.

Bayer, which acquired Monsanto in a $63 billion deal last year, said it was considering its legal options, including an appeal before France’s highest court.

The German chemicals group added that crop-protection products “do not pose a risk for human health if they are used according to the terms of use set out in their regulatory approval”.

Mr Francois had won rulings against Monsanto in 2012 and 2015 before France’s top court overturned the decisions and ordered the new hearing in Lyon.

“We are all happy to have won but it came at a heavy price,” Francois told reporters in Paris.

“It’s a big sigh of relief. It’s been 12 years of fighting, 12 years during which I had to put my whole life on hold.”

Lasso was banned in France in 2007 after the product had been withdrawn in some other countries.

It used a different active substance to glyphosate, the chemical contained in Monsanto’s best-selling weedkiller Roundup and the target of lawsuits in the United States over alleged cancer links.

The company has been found liable in two trials in California brought by cancer sufferers who have been awarded tens of millions of dollars in damages. Bayer is appealing against those rulings.

The legal troubles surrounding glyphosate have contributed to Bayer losing about 30 billion euros in market value since last August. The group’s chief executive on Thursday said it was “massively affected” by the litigation.

After the announcement of the decision, Bayer’s shares extended a fall to trade about 1.5 percent down before recovering some of the losses.

Email This Page

e-max.it: your social media marketing partner
 

Comments   

A note of caution regarding our comment sections:

For months a stream of media reports have warned of coordinated propaganda efforts targeting political websites based in the U.S., particularly in the run-up to the 2016 presidential election.

We too were alarmed at the patterns we were, and still are, seeing. It is clear that the provocateurs are far more savvy, disciplined, and purposeful than anything we have ever experienced before.

It is also clear that we still have elements of the same activity in our article discussion forums at this time.

We have hosted and encouraged reader expression since the turn of the century. The comments of our readers are the most vibrant, best-used interactive feature at Reader Supported News. Accordingly, we are strongly resistant to interrupting those services.

It is, however, important to note that in all likelihood hardened operatives are attempting to shape the dialog our community seeks to engage in.

Adapt and overcome.

Marc Ash
Founder, Reader Supported News

 
+3 # chapdrum 2019-04-13 12:53
A good verdict. However, we are overlooking a (pardon the dubious pun) root issue by not identifying the fact that Monsanto and countless other corporations possess the de facto right to cause cancer, by using carcinogens in their products. As long as that remains legal, we will continue to read accounts of suffering, large damage awards (which are the cost of doing business), and nothing will change.
 
 
0 # hiker 2019-04-13 17:51
I'd like to know who the idiot was at Bayer who approved the purchase of Monsanto in the first place. They had to know this legal monster was coming. Why not wait for Monsanto to take all the legal hits and go bankrupt them pick it up for a song.
 
 
+1 # PABLO DIABLO 2019-04-15 12:48
Boycott the Corporations that are killing us. They won't change. WE MUST.