RSN Fundraising Banner
Saudi Women Activists Stand Trial in Criminal Court
Written by <a href="index.php?option=com_comprofiler&task=userProfile&user=33791"><span class="small">teleSUR</span></a>   
Wednesday, 13 March 2019 12:35

Excerpt: "Loujain al-Hathloul, Aziza al-Yousef, Eman al-Nafjan, and Hatoon Al-Fassi were among the women appearing before the criminal court in the capital of Saudi Arabia where charges were presented against them. The activists, a majority of whom are prominent figures in the women's right movement in the country, were detained last May."

Demonstrators from Amnesty International call on Saudi authorities to release jailed women's rights activists Loujain al-Hathloul, Eman al-Nafjan and Aziza al-Yousef outside the Saudi Arabian Embassy in Paris, France, on March 8. (photo:Benoit Tessier/Reuters)
Demonstrators from Amnesty International call on Saudi authorities to release jailed women's rights activists Loujain al-Hathloul, Eman al-Nafjan and Aziza al-Yousef outside the Saudi Arabian Embassy in Paris, France, on March 8. (photo:Benoit Tessier/Reuters)


Saudi Women Activists Stand Trial in Criminal Court

By teleSUR

13 March 19


Ten Saudi Arabian women stood trial in Riyadh Wednesday for the first time since they were detained last year.

oujain al-Hathloul, Aziza al-Yousef, Eman al-Nafjan, and Hatoon Al-Fassi were among the women appearing before the criminal court in the capital of Saudi Arabia where charges were presented against them. The activists, a majority of whom are prominent figures in the women's right movement in the country, were detained last May.

Al-Hathloul, who had promoted an end to the driving ban, was previously detained twice. Al-Nafjan and al-Yousef participated in a protest against the driving ban in 2013. Al-Yousef also authored a petition, which al-Nafjan and al-Hathloul signed in 2016, requesting an end to male guardianship, the act of requiring women to obtain the consent of a male relative for any major life choices.

Charges they face are said to include supporting "hostile elements" and could carry long prison sentences. Indeed, the public prosecutor said that five men and four women were being held on suspicion of harming the country's interests and offering support to hostile elements abroad. State-backed media labeled them as traitors and "agents of embassies," Middle East Eye (MEE) media reported.

Nevertheless, according to Amnesty International, the kingdom's public prosecuter has still not specified the charges.

Last week, at the U.N. Human Rights Council, 36 countries urged Saudi Arabia to release the detained activists and expressed "significant concerns about reports of continuing arrests and arbitrary detention of human rights defenders in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia." They also asked the country to cooperate with a U.N.-led probe into the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

Activists say some of the detainees were subjected to mistreatment and torture, including electric shocks, flogging, and sexual assault and harassment. The Saudi deputy public prosecutor has said the allegations are "false".

The growing repression and violations of human rights in Saudi Arabia appear while the Prince Mohammed bin Salman (MBS) is intensifying his international public relations campaign and courting the West to support his social reforms even so his reputation was tarnished after Saudi agents killed Khashoggi last October at the kingdom's Istanbul consulate.

Email This Page

e-max.it: your social media marketing partner
 

Comments   

A note of caution regarding our comment sections:

For months a stream of media reports have warned of coordinated propaganda efforts targeting political websites based in the U.S., particularly in the run-up to the 2016 presidential election.

We too were alarmed at the patterns we were, and still are, seeing. It is clear that the provocateurs are far more savvy, disciplined, and purposeful than anything we have ever experienced before.

It is also clear that we still have elements of the same activity in our article discussion forums at this time.

We have hosted and encouraged reader expression since the turn of the century. The comments of our readers are the most vibrant, best-used interactive feature at Reader Supported News. Accordingly, we are strongly resistant to interrupting those services.

It is, however, important to note that in all likelihood hardened operatives are attempting to shape the dialog our community seeks to engage in.

Adapt and overcome.

Marc Ash
Founder, Reader Supported News

 
+2 # Texas Aggie 2019-03-14 12:03
And yet we scream and yell about human rights violations in Venezuela where the government is trying to raise the standard of living of the poorest people, but ignore the serious violations by our good buddies who donate money to our elites and their electoral campaigns. Even Saddam Hussein didn't lower himself to the depths that the Saudis are doing (see Yemen) and it was worthwhile spending thousands of American lives (and >$1 trillion) plus tens or hundreds of thousands of Iraqi lives to bring about regime change in Iraq. And what about the present push to do the same thing only worse in Iran?