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Intimidation, Pressure and Humiliation: Inside Trump's Two-Year War on the Investigations Encircling Him
Written by <a href="index.php?option=com_comprofiler&task=userProfile&user=50194"><span class="small">Mark Mazzetti, Maggie Haberman, Nicholas Fandos and Michael S. Schmidt, The New York Times</span></a>   
Wednesday, 20 February 2019 09:27

Excerpt: "President Trump's efforts have exposed him to accusations of obstruction of justice as Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel, finishes his work."

Republican Representatives Lee Zeldin, left, Mark Meadows, Matt Gaetz and Jim Jordan launched an offensive against the Mueller investigation. (photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Republican Representatives Lee Zeldin, left, Mark Meadows, Matt Gaetz and Jim Jordan launched an offensive against the Mueller investigation. (photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images)


Intimidation, Pressure and Humiliation: Inside Trump's Two-Year War on the Investigations Encircling Him

By Mark Mazzetti, Maggie Haberman, Nicholas Fandos and Michael S. Schmidt, The New York Times

20 February 19


President Trump’s efforts have exposed him to accusations of obstruction of justice as Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel, finishes his work.

s federal prosecutors in Manhattan gathered evidence late last year about President Trump’s role in silencing women with hush payments during the 2016 campaign, Mr. Trump called Matthew G. Whitaker, his newly installed attorney general, with a question. He asked whether Geoffrey S. Berman, the United States attorney for the Southern District of New York and a Trump ally, could be put in charge of the widening investigation, according to several American officials with direct knowledge of the call.

Mr. Whitaker, who had privately told associates that part of his role at the Justice Department was to “jump on a grenade” for the president, knew he could not put Mr. Berman in charge because Mr. Berman had already recused himself from the investigation. The president soon soured on Mr. Whitaker, as he often does with his aides, and complained about his inability to pull levers at the Justice Department that could make the president’s many legal problems go away.

Trying to install a perceived loyalist atop a widening inquiry is a familiar tactic for Mr. Trump, who has been struggling to beat back the investigations that have consumed his presidency. His efforts have exposed him to accusations of obstruction of justice as Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel, finishes his work investigating Russian interference in the 2016 election.

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+16 # No Go 2019-02-20 10:22
When it comes to Trump's efforts to stop, derail, threaten, or otherwise interfere with legitimate efforts to investigate the various legal issues pertaining to himself and his associates during and after the 2016 presidential campaign, "obstruction of justice" is an understatement.
Trump's every utterance is, at best, an obfuscation, and, generally, is a bald-faced lie.
His continuous grimace is an indication that he feels the heat.
His associates going to jail are an indication of the company he keeps, and, potentially, his own fate.
No wonder he is trying to obstruct justice.
He should have kept his reality television show in the television studio, and kept his corruption in his casinos, and not insisted on bringing them into the White House.
 
 
+10 # lfeuille 2019-02-20 18:04
Trump doesn't understand that the Justice Dept. is not composed of his personal attorneys. They all work for the people, not the president and can't be used in his attempts to obstruct justice.
 
 
-2 # dlet60 2019-02-21 19:11
Stop already, we are all witnessing the demise of whatever there ever was of any claim to the democracy of these United States. There is no longer even a choice of the lesser of two evils, choice today is a fallacy of inadequate thinking and imagination. Democrats and republicans are merely two wings of the War Party.
 
 
+4 # DongiC 2019-02-22 02:54
Trump's body language is revealing: a man under tremendous pressure who is not happy with life and the way things are going. At that press conference at the White House, the president walked away mad at his failure to bully Acosta and the other reporter on the source of Trump's charge that drugs are coming across the border in large numbers. The chief executive essentially grabbed his toys and went home. He rarely smiles anymore unless he is talking about Kim or Vladimir. The waters are heating up and Sir Donald is starting to stew.
He is in the real world now, not the fantasy land of the World Wide Wrestling Federation of which he was once co-owner. Somehow, he seems to fit right in to that land of make-believe.