RSN Fundraising Banner
Women in Rural Wisconsin Lack Access to Maternity Care
Written by <a href="index.php?option=com_comprofiler&task=userProfile&user=22014"><span class="small">Associated Press</span></a>   
Monday, 21 January 2019 10:02

Excerpt: "Twenty of Wisconsin's 72 counties don't have an OB-GYN, according to the American Medical Association. For some women, that means driving more than an hour to reach a hospital, while a few have even given birth in their cars."

A pregnant woman. (photo: iStock)
A pregnant woman. (photo: iStock)


Women in Rural Wisconsin Lack Access to Maternity Care

By Associated Press

21 January 19

 

omen in rural Wisconsin often have to travel long distances to access maternity care.

Twenty of Wisconsin's 72 counties don't have an OB-GYN, according to the American Medical Association. For some women, that means driving more than an hour to reach a hospital, while a few have even given birth in their cars.

Beth Miller lives in the small northwestern town of Trego, a 45-minute drive from the closest hospital that delivers babies. Miller told Wisconsin Public Radio that she didn't think she would make it to the hospital in Barron in time when she went into labor in February.

Miller gave birth to her son, Eli, just 10 minutes after arriving at the hospital.

"It was terrifying," she said. "I thought at multiple points that I was going to deliver my baby in my car."

For Miller, it's not an unrealistic concern. She knows of several mothers who haven't reached the hospital in time for delivery, as well as some who drive more than an hour to appointments, she said.

"These are women who lots of times are the primary caregiver for the family," said Melissa Weise, the Mayo Clinic's only certified midwife in Barron who also helped deliver Miller's son. "Sometimes that means finding child care, taking a day off work, things like that just to get into your clinic appointments."

Wisconsin's shortage of obstetric services isn't unique. The U.S. will have between 6,000 and 8,000 fewer OB-GYNs than needed by 2020, according to American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists estimates.

Less than one-half of rural American women live within a 30-minute drive of a hospital that offers maternity services, according to the national association of physicians specializing in obstetrics and gynecology.

President Donald Trump recently signed a bipartisan bill in response to the issue, placing trained obstetricians, gynecologists and maternity care nurses in underserved areas. The legislation also adds maternity care to the types of health care measured for gaps in care.

Email This Page

e-max.it: your social media marketing partner
 

Comments   

A note of caution regarding our comment sections:

For months a stream of media reports have warned of coordinated propaganda efforts targeting political websites based in the U.S., particularly in the run-up to the 2016 presidential election.

We too were alarmed at the patterns we were, and still are, seeing. It is clear that the provocateurs are far more savvy, disciplined, and purposeful than anything we have ever experienced before.

It is also clear that we still have elements of the same activity in our article discussion forums at this time.

We have hosted and encouraged reader expression since the turn of the century. The comments of our readers are the most vibrant, best-used interactive feature at Reader Supported News. Accordingly, we are strongly resistant to interrupting those services.

It is, however, important to note that in all likelihood hardened operatives are attempting to shape the dialog our community seeks to engage in.

Adapt and overcome.

Marc Ash
Founder, Reader Supported News

 
0 # DongiC 2019-01-22 05:41
If you are wealthy and pregnant in Wisconsin, no problemo. You can always get a helicopter to the hospital. If poor, it becomes a much greater challenge, indeed.