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Trump Wanted to Order Justice Department to Prosecute Comey and Clinton
Written by <a href="index.php?option=com_comprofiler&task=userProfile&user=45992"><span class="small">Michael S. Schmidt and Maggie Haberman, The New York Times</span></a>   
Wednesday, 21 November 2018 09:08

Excerpt: "President Trump told the White House counsel in the spring that he wanted to order the Justice Department to prosecute two of his political adversaries: his 2016 challenger, Hillary Clinton, and the former F.B.I. director James B. Comey, according to two people familiar with the conversation."

President Trump stoked his enmity for Hillary Clinton during the 2016 race and since taking office has publicly and privately revisited the idea of prosecuting her. (photo: Cindy Ord/Getty Images/Glamour)
President Trump stoked his enmity for Hillary Clinton during the 2016 race and since taking office has publicly and privately revisited the idea of prosecuting her. (photo: Cindy Ord/Getty Images/Glamour)


Trump Wanted to Order Justice Department to Prosecute Comey and Clinton

By Michael S. Schmidt and Maggie Haberman, The New York Times

21 November 18

 

resident Trump told the White House counsel in the spring that he wanted to order the Justice Department to prosecute two of his political adversaries: his 2016 challenger, Hillary Clinton, and the former F.B.I. director James B. Comey, according to two people familiar with the conversation.

The lawyer, Donald F. McGahn II, rebuffed the president, saying that he had no authority to order a prosecution. Mr. McGahn said that while he could request an investigation, that too could prompt accusations of abuse of power. To underscore his point, Mr. McGahn had White House lawyers write a memo for Mr. Trump warning that if he asked law enforcement to investigate his rivals, he could face a range of consequences, including possible impeachment.

The encounter was one of the most blatant examples yet of how Mr. Trump views the typically independent Justice Department as a tool to be wielded against his political enemies. It took on additional significance in recent weeks when Mr. McGahn left the White House and Mr. Trump appointed a relatively inexperienced political loyalist, Matthew G. Whitaker, as the acting attorney general.

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+3 # BetaTheta 2018-11-21 11:41
Nixon was at least smart enough to do all this in secret. Trump apparently has no clue of where the legal/illegal line lies, which probably says a lot about his former and present business dealings.
 
 
+2 # hiker 2018-11-21 18:45
Even Republicans should be wary of this. Prosecuting political adversaries? That's banana republic territory. He's already green lighting murder of journalists.