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Federal Judges Order Ohio to Allow Purged Voters Back In
Written by <a href="index.php?option=com_comprofiler&task=userProfile&user=22014"><span class="small">Associated Press</span></a>   
Thursday, 01 November 2018 13:08

Excerpt: "Federal judges on Wednesday ordered Ohio to allow voters who had been purged for not voting over a six-year period to participate in this year's election."

Federal judges on Wednesday ordered Ohio to allow voters who had been purged for not voting over a six-year period to participate in this year's election. (photo: John Minchillo/AP)
Federal judges on Wednesday ordered Ohio to allow voters who had been purged for not voting over a six-year period to participate in this year's election. (photo: John Minchillo/AP)


Federal Judges Order Ohio to Allow Purged Voters Back In

By Associated Press

01 November 18


"Every vote counts, including those cast by voters who may not have been engaged in the political process in recent years," an attorney said.

ederal judges on Wednesday ordered Ohio to allow voters who had been purged for not voting over a six-year period to participate in this year's election.

A divided 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel granted an emergency motion sought by voting-rights groups. The ruling overturned in part an Oct. 10 ruling by a federal judge that said voters haven't been illegally purged from Ohio's rolls.

Plaintiffs led by the A. Philip Randolph Institute in June lost their broader challenge to Ohio's election administration process as unconstitutional when the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in favor of Ohio's practices.

But they continued to challenge the confirmation notices the state sent to voters that set off the process of removing them from county voter rolls after not voting in three federal elections or taking other voting-related actions. They said the letters were too vague on letting recipients know the consequences of not responding.

"Plaintiffs have a reasonable, and perhaps even greater, likelihood of success on the merits of their claim that defendant's confirmation notice did not adequately advise registrants of the consequences of failure to respond, as the NVRA (National Voting Rights Act) requires," the court ruled Wednesday.

Judges Julia Smith Gibbons and Eric Clay formed the majority. Judge Eugene Siler Jr. disagreed, saying the plaintiff claims were "all speculation."

Republican Secretary of State Jon Husted said he wouldn't fight the order, to avoid "an unnecessary source of contention with election only five days away." Ohio's procedures will eventually be upheld again, he said, and the state is committed to making it "easy to vote and hard to cheat."

Husted is running for lieutenant governor on a ticket with Attorney General Mike DeWine, who is in a tight race for Democratic gubernatorial nominee Richard Cordray.

The voting-rights groups said that some elections in Ohio, traditionally a swing state, have been settled by small margins, and that turning away potentially thousands of voters could alter outcomes.

"The court's decision will allow more Ohio voters to have their voices heard next Tuesday," attorney Stuart Naifeh of the Demos organization said via email. "Every vote counts, including those cast by voters who may not have been engaged in the political process in recent years. ... In today's ruling, the court recognized that the right to vote is too important to allow states to take it away without giving voters meaningful notice."

Partisan fights overballot access have been playing out around the country. Democrats have accused Republicans of trying to suppress votes from minorities and poorer people who tend to vote for Democrats. Republicans have argued that they are trying to promote ballot integrity and prevent voter fraud.

The 6th Circuit panel found there wasn't an emergency need to block "purges," and that it could consider that part of the appeal later.

Husted said after the Supreme Court ruling in June that no more voters would be removed before the Nov. 6 election.

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Last Updated on Thursday, 01 November 2018 14:44
 

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+6 # MikeAF48 2018-11-01 15:59
Finally a good day for the American voter I you have ever wished you've voted this is the one election you can.t miss. Get out the vote everyone you know the masses will overcome.
 
 
+2 # wilhelmscream 2018-11-01 19:06
OH will just ignore court order anyway; just like GA will ignore court order! F*CK THE RIGHT!!!
 
 
+1 # Macserp 2018-11-01 21:52
The subtext here is interesting.
According to the article, in June, and again, on October 10 a federal judge ruled that the voters rights weren't being violated, meaning that only because of the persistence of the A. Philip Randolph Institute on behalf of the plaintiffs that many affected Ohio citizens can actually vote. Making people jump through hoops and persist through the courts is a sure-fired way to suppress our right to vote.