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Excerpt: "For some reason, we trust ourselves, our allies, and even our former enemies with nuclear arms - evidently so deeply that we don't seem to think the staggering arsenals filled with weaponry that could put the devastation of Hiroshima to shame are worth covering or dealing with."

A doll and gas masks in one of the kindergarten classrooms in the ghost city of Pripyat, deserted since the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear catastrophe. Inhabitants were relocated to other locations in the Soviet Union and the town has remained empty ever since, 04/18/11. (photo: Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images)
A doll and gas masks in one of the kindergarten classrooms in the ghost city of Pripyat, deserted since the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear catastrophe. Inhabitants were relocated to other locations in the Soviet Union and the town has remained empty ever since, 04/18/11. (photo: Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images)



Why No One Notices Our MAD Planet

By William Hartung, TomDispatch

11 July 12

 

can still remember sneaking with two friends into the balcony of some Broadway movie palace to see the world end.  The year was 1959, the film was On the Beach, and I was 15.  It was the movie version of Neville Shute’s still eerie 1957 novel about an Australia awaiting its death sentence from radioactive fallout from World War III, which had already happened in the northern hemisphere.  We three were jacked by the thrill of the illicit and then, to our undying surprise, bored by the quiet, grownup way the movie imagined human life winding down on this planet.  (“We're all doomed, you know. The whole, silly, drunken, pathetic lot of us. Doomed by the air we're about to breathe.”)

It couldn’t hold a candle to giant, radioactive, mutant ants heading for L.A. (Them!), or planets exploding as alien civilizations nuclearized themselves (This Island Earth), or a monstrous prehistoric reptile tearing up Tokyo after being awakened from its sleep by atomic tests (Godzilla), or for that matter the sort of post-nuclear, post-apocalyptic survivalist novels that were common enough in that era.

It’s true that anything can be transformed into entertainment, even versions of our own demise -- and that there’s something strangely reassuring about then leaving a theater or turning the last page of a book and having life go on.  Still, we teenagers didn’t doubt that something serious and dangerous was afoot in that Cold War era, not when we “ducked and covered” under our school desks while (test) sirens screamed outside and the CONELRAD announcer on the radio on the teacher’s desk offered chilling warnings.

Nor did we doubt it when we dreamed about the bomb, as I did reasonably regularly in those years, or when we wondered how our “victory weapon” in the Pacific in World War II might, in the hands of the Reds, obliterate us and the rest of what in those days we called the Free World (with the obligatory caps).  We sensed that, for the first time since peasants climbed into their coffins at the millennium to await the last days, we were potentially already in our coffins in everyday life, that our world could actually vanish in a few moments in a paroxysm of superpower destruction.

Today, from climate change to pandemics, apocalyptic scenarios (real and imaginary) have only multiplied.  But the original world-ender of our modern age, that wonder weapon manqué, as military expert, TomDispatch regular, and author of Prophets of War: Lockheed and the Making of the Military-Industrial Complex Bill Hartung points out, is still unbelievably with us and still proliferating. Yes, logic -- and the evidence from Hiroshima and Nagasaki -- should tell us that nuclear weapons are too staggeringly destructive to be usable, but in crisis moments, logic has never been a particularly human trait. How strange, then, that a genuine apocalyptic possibility has dropped out of our dreams, as well as pop culture, and as Hartung makes clear, is barely visible in our world. Which is why, on a landscape remarkably barren of everything nuclear except the massive arsenals that dot the planet, TomDispatch considers it important to raise the possibility of returning the nuclear issue to the place it deserves in the human agenda. (To catch Timothy MacBain's latest Tomcast audio interview in which Hartung discusses the upside-down world of global nuclear politics, click here or download it to your iPod here.) Tom


Beyond Nuclear Denial
How a World-Ending Weapon Disappeared From Our Lives, But Not Our World

By William D. Hartung

There was a time when nuclear weapons were a significant part of our national conversation.  Addressing the issue of potential atomic annihilation was once described by nuclear theorist Herman Kahn as “thinking about the unthinkable,” but that didn’t keep us from thinking, talking, fantasizing, worrying about it, or putting images of possible nuclear nightmares (often transmuted to invading aliens or outer space) endlessly on screen.

Now, on a planet still overstocked with city-busting, world-ending weaponry, in which almost 67 years have passed since a nuclear weapon was last used, the only nuke that Americans regularly hear about is one that doesn’t exist: Iran’s. The nearly 20,000 nuclear weapons on missiles, planes, and submarines possessed by Russia, the United States, France, the United Kingdom, China, Israel, Pakistan, India, and North Korea are barely mentioned in what passes for press coverage of the nuclear issue.

Today, nuclear destruction finds itself at the end of a long queue of anxieties about our planet and its fate.  For some reason, we trust ourselves, our allies, and even our former enemies with nuclear arms -- evidently so deeply that we don’t seem to think the staggering arsenals filled with weaponry that could put the devastation of Hiroshima to shame are worth covering or dealing with.  Even the disaster at Fukushima last year didn’t revive an interest in the weaponry that goes with the “peaceful” atom in our world.

Attending to the Bomb in a MAD World

Our views of the nuclear issue haven’t always been so shortsighted. In the 1950s, editor and essayist Norman Cousins was typical in frequently tackling nuclear weapons issues for the widely read magazine Saturday Review.  In the late 1950s and beyond, the Ban the Bomb movement forced the nuclear weapons issue onto the global agenda, gaining international attention when it was revealed that Strontium-90, a byproduct of nuclear testing, was making its way into mothers’ breast milk.  In those years, the nuclear issue became personal as well as political.

In the early 1960s, President John F. Kennedy responded to public pressure by signing a treaty with Russia that banned atmospheric nuclear testing (and so further Strontium-90 fallout).  He also gave a dramatic speech to the United Nations in which he spoke of the nuclear arms race as a “sword of Damocles” hanging over the human race, poised to destroy us at any moment.

Popular films like Fail-Safe and Dr. Strangelove captured both the dangers and the absurdity of the superpower arms race.  And when, on the night of October 22, 1962, Kennedy took to the airwaves to warn the American people that a Cuban missile crisis was underway, that it was nuclear in nature, that a Soviet nuclear attack and a “full retaliatory strike on the Soviet Union” were possibilities -- arguably the closest we have come to a global nuclear war -- it certainly got everyone’s attention.

All things nuclear receded from public consciousness as the Vietnam War escalated and became the focus of antiwar activism and debate, but the nuclear issue came back with a vengeance in the Reagan years of the early 1980s when superpower confrontations once again were in the headlines.  A growing anti-nuclear movement first focused on a near-disaster at the Three Mile Island nuclear plant in Pennsylvania (the Fukushima of its moment) and then on the superpower nuclear stand-off that went by the name of “mutually assured destruction” or, appropriately enough, the acronym MAD.

The Nuclear Freeze Campaign generated scores of anti-nuclear resolutions in cities and towns around the country, and in June 1982, a record-breaking million people gathered in New York City’s Central Park to call for nuclear disarmament.  If anyone managed to miss this historic outpouring of anti-nuclear sentiment, ABC news aired a prime-time, made-for-TV movie, The Day After, that offered a remarkably graphic depiction of the missiles leaving their silos and the devastating consequences of a nuclear war.  It riveted a nation.

The collapse of the Soviet Union and the end of that planetary superpower rivalry less than a decade later took nuclear weapons out of the news.  After all, with the Cold War over and no other rivals to the United States, who needed such weaponry or a MAD world either?  The only problem was that the global nuclear landscape was left more or less intact, mission-less but largely untouched (with the proliferation of the weapons to other countries ongoing).  Unacknowledged as it may be, in some sense MAD still exists, even if we prefer to pretend that it doesn’t.

A MAD World That No One Cares to Notice

More than 20 years later, the only nuclear issue considered worth the bother is stopping the spread of the bomb to a couple of admittedly scary and problematic regimes: Iran and North Korea.  Their nuclear efforts make the news regularly and garner attention (to the point of obsession) in media and government circles.  But remind me: when was the last time you read about what should be the ultimate (and obvious) goal -- getting rid of nuclear weapons altogether?

This has been our reality, despite President Obama’s pledge in Prague back in 2009 to seek “the peace and security of a world without nuclear weapons,” and the passage of a modest but important New START arms reduction treaty between the United States and Russia in 2010.  It remains our reality, despite a dawning realization in budget-anxious Washington that we may no longer be able to afford to throw money (as presently planned) at nuclear projects ranging from new ballistic-missile submarines to new facilities for building nuclear warhead components -- all of which are slated to keep the secret global nuclear arms race alive and well decades into the future.

cked and coveIf Iran is worth talking about -- and it is, given the implications of an Iranian bomb for further nuclear proliferation in the Middle East -- what about the arsenals of the actual nuclear states? What about Pakistan, a destabilizing country which has at least 110 nuclear warheads and counting, and continues to view India as its primary adversary despite U.S. efforts to get it to focus on al-Qaeda and the Taliban?  What about India’s roughly 100 nuclear warheads, meant to send a message not just to Pakistan but to neighboring China as well?  And will China hold pat at 240 or so nuclear weapons in the face of U.S. nuclear modernization efforts and plans to surround it with missile defense systems that could, in theory if not practice, blunt China’s nuclear deterrent force?

Will Israel continue to get a free pass on its officially unacknowledged possession of up to 200 nuclear warheads and its refusal to join the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty?  Who are France and the United Kingdom targeting with their forces of 300 and 225 nuclear warheads, respectively?  How long will it take North Korea to develop miniaturized nuclear bombs and deploy them on workable, long-range missiles?  And is New START the beginning or the end of mutual U.S. and Russian arms reductions?

Many of these questions are far more important than whether Iran gets the bomb, but they get, at best, only a tiny fraction of the attention that Tehran’s nuclear program is receiving.  Concern about Pakistan’s nuclear arsenal and a fear of loose nukes in a destabilizing country is certainly part of the subtext of U.S. policy towards Islamabad.  Little effort has been made of late, however, to encourage Pakistan and India to engage in talks aimed at reconciling their differences and opening the way for discussions on reducing their nuclear arsenals.

The last serious effort -- centered on the contentious issue of Kashmir -- reached its high point in 2007 under the regime of Pakistani autocrat Pervez Musharraf, and it went awry in the wake of political changes within his country and Pakistani-backed terrorist attacks on India.  If anything, the tensions now being generated by U.S. drone strikes in Pakistan’s tribal borderlands and other affronts, intended or not, to Pakistan’s sovereignty have undermined any possibility of Washington brokering a rapprochement between Pakistan and India.

In addition, starting in the Bush years, the U.S. has been selling India nuclear fuel and equipment.  This has been part of a controversial agreement that violates prior U.S. commitments to forgo nuclear trade with any nation that has refused to join the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (a pact India has not signed).  Although U.S. assistance is nominally directed towards India’s civilian nuclear program, it helps free up resources that India can use to expand its nuclear weapons arsenal.

The “tilt” towards India that began during the Bush administration has continued under Obama.  Only recently, for instance, a State Department official bragged about U.S. progress in selling advanced weaponry to New Delhi.  Meanwhile, F-16s that Washington supplied to the Pakistani military back in the heyday of the U.S.-Pakistan alliance may have already been adapted to serve as nuclear delivery vehicles in the event of a nuclear confrontation with India.

China has long adhered to a de facto policy of minimum deterrence -- keeping just enough nuclear weapons to dissuade another nation from attacking it with nuclear arms.  But this posture has not prevented Beijing from seeking to improve the quality of its long-range ballistic missiles.  And if China feels threatened by continued targeting by the United States or by sea-based American interceptors deployed to the region, it could easily increase its arsenal to ensure the “safety” of its deterrent.  Beijing will also be keeping a watchful eye on India as its nuclear stockpile continues to grow.

Ever since Ronald Reagan -- egged on by mad scientists like Edward Teller and right-wing zealots like Lt. Gen. Daniel O. Graham -- pledged to build a perfect anti-nuclear shield that would render nuclear weapons “impotent and obsolete,” missile defense has had a powerful domestic constituency in the United States.  This has been the case despite the huge cost and high-profile failures of various iterations of the missile defense concept.

The only concrete achievement of three decades of missile defense research and development so far has been to make Russia suspicious of U.S. intentions.  Even now, rightly or not, Russia is extremely concerned about the planned installation of U.S. missile defenses in Europe that Washington insists will be focused on future Iranian nuclear weapons.  Moscow feels that they could just as easily be turned on Russia.  If President Obama wins a second term, he will undoubtedly hope to finesse this issue and open the door to further joint reductions in nuclear forces, or possibly even consider reducing this country’s nuclear arsenal significantly, whether or not Russia initially goes along.

Recent bellicose rhetoric from Moscow underscores its sensitivity to the missile defense issue, which may yet scuttle any plans for serious nuclear negotiations.  Given that the U.S. and Russia together possess more than 90% of the world’s nuclear weapons, an impasse between the two nuclear superpowers (even if they are not “super” in other respects) will undercut any leverage they might have to encourage other nations to embark on a path leading to global nuclear reductions.

In his 1960s ode to nuclear proliferation, “Who’s Next,” Tom Lehrer included the line “Israel’s getting tense, wants one in self-defense.”  In fact, Israel was the first -- and for now the only -- Middle Eastern nation to get the bomb, with reports that it can deliver a nuclear warhead not only from land-based missiles but also via cruise missiles launched from nuclear submarines.  Whatever it may say about Israel’s technical capabilities in the military field, Israel’s nuclear arsenal may also be undermining its defense, particularly if it helps spur Iran to build its own nukes.  And irresponsible talk by some Israeli officials about attacking Iran only increases the chance that Tehran will decide to go nuclear.

It is hard to handicap the grim, “unthinkable” but hardly inconceivable prospect that August 9, 1945, will not prove to be the last time that nuclear weapons are used on this planet.  Perhaps some of the loose nuclear materials or inadequately guarded nuclear weapons littering the globe -- particularly, but not solely, in the states of the former Soviet Union -- might fall into the hands of a terrorist group.  Perhaps an Islamic fundamentalist government will seize power in Pakistan and go a step too far in nuclear brinkmanship with India over Kashmir.  Maybe the Israeli leadership will strike out at Iran with nuclear weapons in an effort to keep Tehran from going nuclear.  Maybe there will be a miscommunication or false alarm that will result in the United States or Russia launching one of their nuclear weapons that are still in Cold War-style, hair-trigger mode.

Although none of these scenarios, including a terrorist nuclear attack, may be as likely as nuclear alarmists sometimes suggest, as long as the world remains massively stocked with nuclear weapons, one of them -- or some other scenario yet to be imagined -- is always possible.  The notion that Iran can’t be trusted with such a weapon obscures a larger point: given their power to destroy life on a monumental scale, no individual and no government can ultimately be trusted with the bomb.

The only way to be safe from nuclear weapons is to get rid of them -- not just the Iranian one that doesn’t yet exist, but all of them.  It’s a daunting task.  It’s also a subject that’s out of the news and off anyone’s agenda at the moment, but if it is ever to be achieved, we at least need to start talking about it. Soon.

William D. Hartung is the director of the Arms and Security Project at the Center for International Policy, a TomDispatch regular, and the author of Prophets of War: Lockheed Martin and the Making of the Military-Industrial Complex. (To catch Timothy MacBain's latest Tomcast audio interview in which Hartung discusses the upside-down world of global nuclear politics, click here or download it to your iPod here.)

 

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0 # Bodiotoo 2012-07-11 08:38
Does anyone really believe thier will not be a nuclear holocast before the end of this century...popul ation control of for humanity.
 
 
+7 # reiverpacific 2012-07-11 08:58
It's all part of the old Roman "Panem et Circences" (Bread and circuses" or latterly "Pizza and TV") a.k.a., "Keep em' cheaply happy and dumb" attitude prevalent in the richer, US - influenced countries, especially here.
Set that against theocracies on which the US continue to be dependent, with simmering-for-w orldliness younger populations but who mostly resent a western presence in their lands, Israel notwithstanding , and you have an even more dangerous tinder-box than the cold war era, where the battle lines were clearly defined and the weaponry limited (but was still insane).
Now the plutocrats and their lobbyist-fueled lackeys tend to fabricate the constantly-shif ting hostilities and call them out ever more loudly on their wholly-owned commercial propaganda machines to a poorly or non-educated citizenry with no questioning or analytical abilities who listen avidly to FOX, Mush Limpballs and the content-lite owner media which includes PBS now.
Yet Obama has been touting "Safe Nuclear" and "Clean Coal" since his campaign days, whilst still over-funding the military death-machine.
The Nuclear clock is ticking more loudly than ever -it's just that the economically-ch allenged, "new-poor" under-educated, shit-scared, more and more surveilled populace has been deafened to it.
Collective insanity it is!
 
 
+5 # Kootenay Coyote 2012-07-11 09:35
"...the Ban the Bomb movement forced the nuclear weapons issue onto the global agenda, gaining international attention when it was revealed that Strontium-90, a byproduct of nuclear testing, was making its way into mothers’ breast milk."

And into Dairy milk. This was directly responsible for the unprecedented & massive Childhood Leukemia epidemic; a disease which had formerly been extremely uncommon.

"...the grim, “unthinkable” but hardly inconceivable prospect that August 9, 1945, will not prove to be the last time that nuclear weapons are used on this planet."

So what about Depleted Uranium, scattered across the sands of Iraq in both Desert Wars? I note that the USA is the only nation to have used nuclear weapons in Warfare.
 
 
-5 # tomo 2012-07-11 17:47
The main thing is that we should keep Iran from getting its hands on nuclear weapons--or the possibility of such. As for our own staggering arsenal, we need to refine it yet further. For one thing, everyone knows our weaponry is altogether defensive. The last thing in the world the United States would ever do is use a nuclear weapon against anyone.
 
 
+2 # PABLO DIABLO 2012-07-11 18:50
TOMO We already did it twice against civilian populations in Japan.
 
 
0 # Bigfella 2012-07-11 22:05
For one thing, everyone knows our weaponry is altogether defensive. The last thing in the world the United States would ever do is use a nuclear weapon against anyone.
Please!!!! What are spent uraium bullets,shells and bombs in Afgainistian Iraq Yeman etc etc The USA even suppied them to Israel who used them in "The Lebinon or did you miss seeing the 1/3 mile hole they left....
Children and adults are dieing every day from these weapons whose radiation keeps killing long after the battles on both sides....bombs and missiles arrrrrh it all BS!
 
 
0 # RobertMStahl 2012-07-14 07:53
Look at the late Joe Vialls about using WWII dam-busting bomb technology to get the real scoop about the 'last' nuclear bomb. The tsunami in the Indian Ocean was just the largest single mass murder of all time. First, WWII, then 9/11. The geology is just too simple, like knowing how the data changed from a 6.3 on the Richter scale to the third largest earthquake ever recorded in an area that has no record of strike dip earthquakes, or, even if it did, there has never been a round tsunami. Then, the position of it changed dramatically, when, never before has the seismic data been so distorted, not even close. Also, there were buildings left standing perfectly intact, a mosque in particular, at the closest point where land was to the actual event, indicating a wave had passed over, not an earthquake.

With the strategic position of Northern Aceh province for submarine traffic being wholesaled since, with everyone drowned, less than 3500 troops were needed to 'take over' the province. Oddly, during the Iraq war only a year and a half into it, there was a full contingent of soldiers station in Hong Kong that had arrived exactly on time in the Indian Ocean, plus many troops on Red Cross boats making military maneuvers, all of which were profiled beforehand, you can be sure. Finally, Indian air force jets, the latest and greatest stationed on an island far off the coast, happened, all, to be in the air that day.
 
 
0 # RobertMStahl 2012-07-14 07:40
Fat Man and Little Boy were the Manhatten Project's Mark I and Mark III designs, both utilizing enriched uranium. A third design was the Mark II where the triggering mechanism pushed many pieces of uranium into critical mass instead of just two pieces. With so much more missing to what happened, actually, one should note this.

When the general in charge asked Oppenheimer if he was satisfied with the science, he said he wished he had proof of Mark II's design working. The very next day, a ship was sailed in to Port Chicago, a generally black population maybe 60 miles in the bay behind San Francisco. That night, Mark II blew up. It made the news, but the propaganda of war has squelched it, like everything else the laboratory of war since the beginning of time has been squelched.

The covert and overt actions of history are best described with some propriety by the psychology of Gregory Bateson. But, in this electronic age, the new laboratory is such of which Indira Singh and William Binney describe, more to a tee.
 

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