FB Share
Email This Page
add comment
read more of todays top articles

Krugman writes: "In the 2012 election...the picture of the G.O.P. as the party of sneering plutocrats stuck, even as Democrats became more openly populist than they have been in decades."

Portrait, New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, 06/15/09. Paul Krugman, The New York Times
Portrait, New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, 06/15/09. Paul Krugman, The New York Times


Makers, Takers, Fakers

By Paul Krugman, The New York Times

28 January 13

 

Republicans have a problem. For years they could shout down any attempt to point out the extent to which their policies favored the elite over the poor and the middle class; all they had to do was yell “Class warfare!” and Democrats scurried away. In the 2012 election, however, that didn’t work: the picture of the G.O.P. as the party of sneering plutocrats stuck, even as Democrats became more openly populist than they have been in decades.

As a result, prominent Republicans have begun acknowledging that their party needs to improve its image. But here’s the thing: Their proposals for a makeover all involve changing the sales pitch rather than the product. When it comes to substance, the G.O.P. is more committed than ever to policies that take from most Americans and give to a wealthy handful.

Consider, as a case in point, how a widely reported recent speech by Bobby Jindal the governor of Louisiana, compares with his actual policies.

go to original article

 

Comments   

We are concerned about a recent drift towards vitriol in the RSN Reader comments section. There is a fine line between moderation and censorship. No one likes a harsh or confrontational forum atmosphere. At the same time everyone wants to be able to express themselves freely. We'll start by encouraging good judgment. If that doesn't work we'll have to ramp up the moderation.

General guidelines: Avoid personal attacks on other forum members; Avoid remarks that are ethnically derogatory; Do not advocate violence, or any illegal activity.

Remember that making the world better begins with responsible action.

- The RSN Team

 
-100 # moafu@yahoo.com 2013-01-28 10:17
Of course the observations of an "elitist" GOP bag of buffoons applies. Rather accurate observation, Klugman. However, so does the claim of a raging attack by the Left on the Constitution. "Principles" ARE "absolutes". Because the Pres. says they aren't doesn't change logic ! The Left doesn't like a standard by which all people should live. They want to change it to how people "feel".

A lot of times I don't 'feel' like driving the speed limit, but the principle of respecting others is an absolute. At the same time, 'elites' should not be blocking healthy provision for the masses.

The O. and Hillary team of mass deception on Benghazi is as bad as the intransigence of the GOP'ers.

You think the country is in trouble now !! Just wait til the bills start coming in !! Heaven help us.
 
 
-94 # edge 2013-01-28 11:08
Moral of the story is you should have voted for Romney!

Romney wanted to get rid of the loopholes that Obama kept!

Obama kept the loopholes for his buddy Warren Buffet. His taxes will barely go up.
Changing the RATE he pays on ordinary income does very little since he makes most on dividends and Capital gains!
 
 
+56 # BradFromSalem 2013-01-28 11:56
Edge,

Of course the Republicans were demanding that dividends and Capital gains be taxed at least as much as earned through actual work income.

Psst, wanna buy a bridge?
 
 
+38 # BradFromSalem 2013-01-28 11:53
moafu,

From the bottom up.

We pay the bills by "printing" the money. PROBLEM SOLVED

The alleged mass deception in Benghazi if true happened for reasons. First, as you suspect, to protect the President's chances at re-election. Second to protect CIA assets in the area. In the first case, politicians do that shit all the time, so is it only a big deal when a Democrat does it? Or maybe only a black man? And if its the second reason, then that just makes the outrage at the limited coverup more stupid. In either case, please leave those unfortunate people that died out of your anti Obama rhetoric. LOW CLASS

Please explain what you mean by the Left attacking the US Constitution. Your example of driving over the speed limit is useless, since nobody, NOBODY, on the Left is claiming that if they feel like speeding it should be allowed. If as I think you are talking about interpreting the Constitution, as I think you are. Waht you are saying is a total nonsequitor. We have 3 branches of government that everything they do is based on how each branch interprets the Constitution. And as anyone know, there is no absolute interpretation to any framework. I can put up a house frame, and each architect will come along and build something very different out that framework. And those archetect designs will evolve over time to account for items like running water.
THINK
 
 
+4 # Eldon J. Bloedorn 2013-01-29 18:27
Are Republicans a lot like the a man Benjamin Franklin describes in his autobiography? A man needs a horse, real bad. He "cases" a farmer's property. Watches what time the family leaves for church, kids go to school. Picks the right day-when the family is at church. Steals the horse Based on "truth." His desire to steal the horse is greater than his fear of getting caught. Are not Republicans a lot like a common horse thief? They try to steal votes by enacting voter suppression laws. They now want to steal elections by trying to "rig" the electoral college. They steal middle class money by stripping workers rights to a livable income. And, they are getting caught in some instances and they "swear" they are not simply common horse thieves.
 
 
+1 # mdhome 2013-01-29 21:36
Moafu, Could you explain how the death of 4 Americans who went to a place known to have its dangers is ten thousand times worse than the murder of 20 first graders and 6 adults at a school in Connecticut.
 
 
+42 # reiverpacific 2013-01-28 11:14
Gawd forbid that the US follows the lead of Louisiana which is one of the most backward and corrupt states in the Union (Conversely, new Orleans is one of my favorite cities -a sort of cultural island in a redneck swamp, tourists notwithstanding ) with Bobby Jingle-bells a professional flip-flopper and as open to corruption as any of his peers and good o'l boys in state governments.
He's already been the recipient of recall effort which he flip-flopped on and I suspect bought his way out of.
Sure, America is not the federal government but his version of what it would be is like Reagan on steroids -a lobbyists Nirvana; ot's bad enough as it is but these guys would reduce the states to a bunch of militia-run enclaves for the privileged.
 
 
+29 # Todd Williams 2013-01-28 11:56
Rather than directly replying to the absurd posts by moafu and edge, I will let my red voting speak for my feeling on both these singularly silly statements.

Gov. Jindal is merely playing to the comments of some pundits on TV news. This "new" message by some in the GOP is nothing more than a lame attempt to garner some moderate GOP voters if there are any more left. The stated planks of the GOP are what we need to look at. And they have not changed one iota since the November routing by Dems. The Deep South is still the Deep South and I doubt if it will ever change.

Lastly, I do get a kick out of Jindal's desire to dispense with state income tax and shift the burden to sales tax. I just wonder how those tourists in New Orleans will like paying the additional sales tax on their rooms, meals, drinks and other purchases? Of course, Jindal will be there with his hand out for more Federal dollars to make up for the budget deficeit.
 
 
+42 # genierae 2013-01-28 11:58
Thank you Mr. Krugman! I saw him on Morning Joe today and as usual his truth cut right through the drivel of those on the panel. He is clear and precise on what this country needs to do, and he keeps repeating his message at every opportunity. In the past he was ignored or shouted down, but now he seems to be taken more seriously. The dishonesty and hypocrisy of these right-wing Republicans is diabolical, and most of them profess to be followers of Jesus! This shows their cynicism, that they feel free to use Him as a shield for their crimes. This is all the proof needed that they don't believe he even exists. And if they were ever to meet Him, he would say to them, "I don't know you."
 
 
+1 # Scotty44 2013-01-28 13:40
Did you read the full article on the NYTs? Oh, maybe you meant Krugman.
 
 
+1 # genierae 2013-01-28 18:13
Yes.
 
 
+8 # Onterryo 2013-01-28 12:43
So, the wealthy and the landowners justified slavery. Their views were supposedly, according to their arguments, supported by the Bible (interesting that there is no attack on slavery in the mid-East by Jesus) and by the Constitution and the Supreme Court. Institutions once popular or ingrained and considered "absolutes", were and/or continue to be supported by arguments that strain incredulity ("black slaves are treated better than in Europe", "guns don't kill, people do") but principled absolute truths are self-evident. Denying the need for better gun-control laws or universal health care today is no different than the wealthy and landowners who justified slavery in the 1800's.

BTW...your speed limit analogy...local police were using a stretch of road to get their quota of tickets handed out to drivers who exceeded the speed limits. It was too low given that just down the road, with more narrow lanes, the speed limit was higher. Guess what? A politician got a ticket and now they have raised the speed limit.

Lastly, show me the "mass deception"! The Republicans in the Senate and the House would love to have you call them with your evidence!
 
 
-8 # Scotty44 2013-01-28 13:39
No they wouldn't. Both parties are complicit. Think of the Kennedy assassination's Warren Report, and 9/11's 9/11 Committee Report. And is either party trying to rein in the President's abuses of civil and human rights, and privacy guaranteed by the constitution? Both want to protect social security, but neither address its long term viability. Isn't that "mass deception" on both parties parts? While it could be just delaying, did either parties leadership make any viable proposals that wouldn't reduce the current minimal benefits?
 
 
+16 # mjc 2013-01-28 13:44
As a thirteen-year old I read Ayn Rand and thought her heroes and heroines had just the right stuff to deal with the world. Nothing is more satisfying than being a solid individualist: me first, second and always. The fact that there are Republicans...P aul Ryan, of course, who still believe that the individual is the only important feature of a life. It is easy to believe that the makers are the most important group in society. The problem is to believe that the rich, the very wealthy, are the makers the job creators and thus must be spared paying much in the way of income tax. Today, the stock market is the gambling den for the wealthy but certainly can't claim to be a job creation mechanism. The Tea Party individuals and the Republican politicians who have adopted their version of Ayn Rand certainly believe they have the answer to society woes, especially the economic ones of the past six years. They do not fault the over extension of mortgage loans, the hedge fund manipulation or lack of jobs and lack of lending by banking interests as reasons for the slump in the economy. Krugman points that out beautifully. The 47%, those on Social Security, the Medicare and Medicaid recipients, brought this slump down on us. This isn't the first time that the Republicans have tried to eliminate Social Security or swamp Medicare and it will probably not be the last.
 
 
+4 # reiverpacific 2013-01-28 18:11
Quoting mjc:
As a thirteen-year old I read Ayn Rand and thought her heroes and heroines had just the right stuff to deal with the world. Nothing is more satisfying than being a solid individualist: me first, second and always. The fact that there are Republicans...Paul Ryan, of course, who still believe that the individual is the only important feature of a life. It is easy to believe that the makers are the most important group in society. The problem is to believe that the rich, the very wealthy, are the makers the job creators and thus must be spared paying much in the way of income tax. Today, the stock market is the gambling den for the wealthy but certainly can't claim to be a job creation mechanism. The Tea Party individuals and the Republican politicians who have adopted their version of Ayn Rand certainly believe they have the answer to society woes, especially the economic ones of the past six years. They do not fault the over extension of mortgage loans, the hedge fund manipulation or lack of jobs and lack of lending by banking interests as reasons for the slump in the economy. Krugman points that out beautifully. The 47%, those on Social Security, the Medicare and Medicaid recipients, brought this slump down on us. This isn't the first time that the Republicans have tried to eliminate Social Security or swamp Medicare and it will probably not be the last.

You are HOW OLD??
I was a stammering moron at our age. You give me hope.
 
 
+2 # mjc 2013-01-29 09:28
Eight decades marked just recently. But I am sure you were't a stammering moron at any age.
 
 
0 # rockieball 2013-01-30 09:34
Most likely a bit younger than me. i read her in high school in the 60's and thought her judging by her charters a self center me only, the rest be damned bitch. People who follow her would give (I take that back try to sell) a glass of water to a drowning man to make a profit so they could be above the rest. These are the same type of people who criticize and try no remove Mark Twain from libraries for writing about the social inequalities to the blacks and poor white's, but then support the social inequalities of the rich to the poor upon whose backs they built their wealth.
 
 
+6 # Dangoodbar 2013-01-28 14:53
Krugman's main point, that Reps on economic issues represent a true minority of the population is beyond dispute. But that has been true since Hoover and most true since Reagan. Yet turning hard right under Reagan is when the GOP became the dominant party. But Reagan's hard right turn while only "doing" economic issue in rhetoric was hardest on social issues.

So what has changed at the national level to cause people to vote for their own best economic interests? I mean the deepest of the red states including Louisiana are the poorest states in the union and are most hurt by Rep policies versus Dem policies.

My own view is that Obama's election was the end of the beginning of the story of race in America. Obama's re-election is the beginning of the end of the story of race in America.

So here is the problem for the GOP. Its non-economic message, God, Guns, Gay's, Race and abortion combined with big money no longer win. So does it moderate on economic issues where the money is or on the social issues where the votes are. That is moderating on social issues will mean relying less on non economic issues to expand the economic base beyond 2%, or moderating on social issues an losing the south.

That is the GOP can either find more Americans who hate Americans, or its money people have to be less greedy.
 
 
+2 # mjc 2013-01-29 09:33
It is surprising to me just how "racist" some of the Republicans seem. They focus on Obama obsessively. He becomes a sort of evil genius in their eyes. And I am sure that they would never accept the label of racist or anti-black either.
 
 
0 # EPGAH3 2013-01-31 18:54
So you accept, "But he's BLACK!" as an excuse for the mess he's made of the nation, and his threat to legalize "a few" MILLION illegals at the time we LEAST need more competition for jobs?
If racism is ever to disappear, we need to erase so-called "positive" racism too, such as holding minorities to lower, easier standards!
 

THE NEW STREAMLINED RSN LOGIN PROCESS: Register once, then login and you are ready to comment. All you need is a Username and a Password of your choosing and you are free to comment whenever you like! Welcome to the Reader Supported News community.

RSNRSN