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Yoder writes: "Forests in the American West are having a harder time recovering from wildfires because of (what else?) climate change, according to new research published in Ecology Letters."

The aftermath of a wildfire. (photo: Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post/Getty Images)
The aftermath of a wildfire. (photo: Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post/Getty Images)


One-Third of Forests Aren’t Growing Back After Wildfires

By Kate Yoder, Grist

18 December 17

 

orests in the American West are having a harder time recovering from wildfires because of (what else?) climate change, according to new research published in Ecology Letters.

Researchers measured the growth of seedlings in 1,500 wildfire-scorched areas in Colorado, Wyoming, Washington, Idaho, and Montana. Across the board, they found “significant decreases” in tree regeneration, a benchmark for forest resilience. In one-third of the sites, researchers found zero seedlings.

The warmest, driest forests were hit especially hard.

“Seedlings are more sensitive to warm, dry conditions than mature trees, so if the right conditions don’t exist within a few years following a wildfire, tree seedlings may not establish,” said Philip Higuera, a coauthor of the study.

Earlier this month, a separate study found that ponderosa pine and pinyon forests in the West are becoming less resilient due to droughts and warmer temperatures. Researchers told the New York Times that as trees disappear, some forests could shift to entirely different ecosystems, like grasslands or shrublands.

You’d think the rapid reconfiguration of entire ecosystems would really light a fire under us to deal with climate change, wouldn’t you?


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0 # Wise woman 2017-12-18 23:01
You would think but the problem is, too few do! I was in Yellowstone in `99 and there were huge areas of burned out forests that had not recovered from the fires of `88. And Yellowstone gets plenty of snow. Forests like anything else are very sensitive to their environment. People in California are now showing signs of lung problems due to the smoke. Are we concerned about that???
 
 
0 # pres 2017-12-19 03:14
It took thousands of years to create those forests.
Their main recovery will require lifetimes.
Essentially, the damage is permanent.
(a big price to pay for the firemans extra pay)
 

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