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Excerpt: "The White House is finalizing a plan to demand hardline immigration reforms in exchange for supporting a fix on the DACA program, according to three people familiar with the talks - an approach that risks alienating Democrats and even many Republicans, potentially tanking any deal."

White House senior policy adviser Stephen Miller was upset after President Trump's dinner with senators Schumer and Pelosi and has been working since to bring the president back to the tougher stance he took during his campaign. (photo: Susan Walsh/AP)
White House senior policy adviser Stephen Miller was upset after President Trump's dinner with senators Schumer and Pelosi and has been working since to bring the president back to the tougher stance he took during his campaign. (photo: Susan Walsh/AP)


ALSO SEE: Nearly 50,000 DACA Recipients Stand to Be
Deported if They Don't Meet Today's Deadline

White House Plans to Demand Immigration Cut by Half in Exchange for DACA Fix

By Josh Dawsey, Andrew Restuccia and Matthew Nussbaum, Politico

05 October 17


Aide Stephen Miller, Trump's top immigration adviser, is crafting a hard-line plan that risks blowing up any deal with Democrats.

he White House is finalizing a plan to demand hard-line immigration reforms in exchange for supporting a fix on the DACA program, according to three people familiar with the talks — an approach that risks alienating Democrats and even many Republicans, potentially tanking any deal.

The White House proposal is being crafted by Stephen Miller, the administration’s top immigration adviser, and includes cutting legal immigration by half over the next decade, an idea that’s already been panned by lawmakers in both parties.

The principles would likely be a political non-starter for Democrats and infuriate Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, who have negotiated with President Donald Trump on immigration and left a White House meeting last month indicating a solution was near. They could also divide Republicans, many of whom oppose cutting legal immigration.

Miller was upset after Trump’s dinner last month with Schumer and Pelosi and has been working since to bring the president back to the tougher stance he took during his campaign.

Miller has begun talking with Hill aides and White House officials about the principles in recent days. The administration is expected to send its immigration wish-list to Congress in the coming days, perhaps as soon as this weekend, said the people familiar with the plan, who include two administration officials. They requested anonymity to discuss the ongoing negotiations.

A White House official cautioned that the plans have not been finalized and could still change. Miller didn't respond to a request for comment.

Unless they change dramatically from their current form, the immigration principles could short-circuit congressional negotiations aimed at finding a fix to DACA, or the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program — the Obama-era initiative that grants work permits to undocumented immigrants who arrived in the United States as minors.

“Handing Stephen Miller the pen on any DACA deal after the revolt from their base is the quickest way to blow it up,” said a senior Democratic Senate aide.

Lawmakers on both sides of the Capitol panned an earlier White House immigration proposal spearheaded by Miller, the RAISE Act, when the White House rolled it out in August. Republicans including Sens. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and Ron Johnson .)of Wisconsin all but declared the proposal dead on arrival.

Trump announced last month that he would end the DACA program, but he said he’d give Congress six months to come up with a legislative solution.

Despite Trump’s efforts to make nice with Schumer and Pelosi, Republican lawmakers signaled this week that the president is prepared to demand tough immigration measures as part of the negotiations.

In addition to provisions in the RAISE Act, the White House’s immigration principles also include parts of the Davis-Oliver Act, including measures that would give state and local law enforcement power to enforce immigration laws, allow states to write their own immigration laws and expand criminal penalties for entering the U.S. illegally.

The principles would also incorporate a provision from the Davis-Oliver Act that puts the onus on Congress to designate Temporary Protected Status, which allows immigrants to temporarily stay in the United States because they are unable to return to their home country as a result of a natural disaster or other dangerous circumstances.

The Davis-Oliver Act gives Congress 90 days to approve a measure extending TPS protections to a foreign state. If Congress does not act, the designation will be terminated. Lawmakers have raised concerns that Congress will be unable to agree on the designations, effectively killing the program.

In addition, the principles call for billions of dollars in border security, as well as money for detention beds and more immigration judges, according to the people familiar with them. Republicans are likely to support those moves.


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+1 # RLF 2017-10-06 07:49
"They could also divide Republicans, many of whom oppose cutting legal immigration."

They oppose cutting the special immigration visas for coders from India and China! Let the IT industry take some responsibility for the educational system in this country to train people rather than undercut wages by importing cheap labor.
 
 
+1 # PCPrincess 2017-10-06 10:40
There are more than enough trained coders in this country, including myself. In fact, some of the IT Visa holders are forced to cheat on tests in order to qualify to enter.

Many of us are still waiting for a job.
Note: I absolutely have no issues with a persons nationality, or skin color. What I find infuriating are the business practices of companies in the U.S. and those politicians who enable them to cheat citizens for a profit.
 

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